Violets. Are they weeds or flowers? Why?

@coolseeds (3921)
United States
April 22, 2007 12:40pm CST
I went outside to make room for my plants I noticed several violets blooming all over the place. In the traditional flower bed if it wasn't planted there it is a weed. I pull them out of flower beds and throw them into the compost pile all of the time. I don't know of any flower beds that have there intentionally. But a large clump of violets can make great ground cover if used properly. Unless the violets are in my back yard I consider them a weed. How about you?
9 people like this
15 responses
@Gumball (793)
• United States
25 Apr 07
I love wild violets and had them planted (on purpose) in my flowerbed at the house I used to live at. I have absolutely NO luck with normal flowers or plants so when I saw these pretty purple, blue, white and yellow flowers growing in the wild, I dug several plants of them up and brought them home. I also had bloodroot, trilliums, irises, and bluebells but found out the hard way to NEVER plant buttercups. They nearly took over the yard. :D I figure if a wild violet can survive being in the wild, it can survive me. LOL
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
8 May 07
They do go crazy. You have to keep them in check with the weed eater. =)
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@rosie_123 (6118)
23 Apr 07
Well I think serious gardeners would consider them weeds, but I personally love them, and would never pull the up. My garden is very much a traditional English country garden. I don't have any regimented rows, things just grow naturally, and I adore all the old fashioned flowers that grow in the wild here like bluebells, forget-me-nots, primroses, cowslips etc. I have loads of violets at this time of year, - they are such a beautiful colour, and they always seem to come out to "celebrate" my Birthday which is next week. So I say - keep them. They are pretty, don't do any harn, and add a patch of colour.
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
24 Apr 07
I like Myosotis ( Forget-me-not)and the Primula genus. I mow for someone that has a small hill along a stream who had thousands of them Myosotis. I saved as much as could so she could have a surprise when she saw it. She called and asked if I forgot about it. =( I told her to check and she could see there was not a blade of grass uncut and I was saving the flowers until they go to seed. It actually takes longer to go around all of them than to mow over them. A perfect example of is it a weed or flower. LOL
1 person likes this
@creematee (2810)
• United States
25 Apr 07
If they are growing in my yard, it's a weed. Unless, of course, my kids have picked a small bouquet of them for me. I much prefer them growing in my garden area--where they can at least be controlled. :)
1 person likes this
@ESKARENA1 (18299)
23 Apr 07
a weed is simply a flower growing in the wrong place. I love violets and cultivate them extensively in my garden, ive never heard of them as a weed before blessed be
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@Galena (9123)
22 Apr 07
what is a weed. just a plant growing somewhere a certain species of animal doesn't want it. my herb garden is fantastic. and yet a lot of the things in it aren't considered herbs. to most people they are considered weeds. but they are fascinating, often attractive and overall USEFUL plants. I even have an area turned over to growing nettles for the kitchen. they are delicious and full of iron. no plant is a weed, if you take the time to get to know it.
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
22 Apr 07
LOL that reminds me. I have a place where there were stinging nettles growing. You don't find them often so I left them there. They are about 2 feet tall now but I do keep them contained to their area so they do not become weeds.
@Galena (9123)
22 Apr 07
okay, so try cropping some of the young leaves from the top, give them a quick slosh with boiling water to wilt the stings, then use it as you would spinach. lovely. one of my favourite things it to chop it up and cook it in with scrambled eggs.
@mtdewgurl74 (18118)
• United States
23 Apr 07
Sweet violet. - This is a photo of a few wild violets aka sweet violets. They are used in many culinary dishes and even has medical herbal uses. It has about 400-500 different varities of he plant..
When I was younger before I knew about wild greens I called my grandmother and told her my mom was feeding us weeds and grass. My grandmother explained everything to me and I have been eating them since. My husbands family thinks I am nuts but i put them in everything even replaced the spinach with the wild greens in a pan of lasgna.
@mtdewgurl74 (18118)
• United States
23 Apr 07
I call it a flower my husband calls it a weed and mows it down. I read up on violets and found out they are about 400-500 different violet species. I also found out that when you smell a violet it has a component of the scent is a ketone compound called ionone, which temporarily desensitises the receptors in the nose; this prevents any further scent from being detected from the flower. When newly opened, violet flowers may be used to decorate salads or in stuffings for poultry or fish. Souffl├ęs, cream and similar desserts can be flavoured with essence of violet flowers. The young leaves are edible raw or cooked as a somewhat bland leaf vegetable. Flowers, leaves and roots are also used for medical purposes, being rich in vitamins A and C. Violet flowers are also used to make an herbal tea that is used in herbal medicine. I think I would let them grow maybe in a better place but they do have there uses and are pretty I think of them as wild pansies because that what some of them look like. We have more trouble with wild honeysuckle vines and morning glories which are pretty and smell nice but they can strangle out your other flowers easily...
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
23 Apr 07
I was going to reply that you can eat them but you said it as well as they are a relatives to the pansy. I call Pansies, Viola. Which usually leads to some one who doesn't know any better trying to correct me. Ipomoea or Morning glories are a pain. As far as the Campsis, Honeysuckle, just plant it in a large pot and try to leave about an inch of the pot out of the ground. This should tame its wild ways.
@slickcut (8141)
• United States
22 Apr 07
Well i suppose they are actually called a wild flower,but i think they are very pretty if they were located in one place but many times they are just scattered around and not in the right places so i suppose its best to pull them up.The birds cause these things to grow because they carry the seeds in their n mouth and pollinate them.If it were a field they would be very pretty.Have you ever considered a wild flower bed? I had one once,and they are pretty.I just call those Gods garden...I love plants and flowers and i think you and i are alike when it comes to this.I can imagine you having very nice flowers....I could get up at the break of dawn and do yard work all day long,i love it so much..I even stroke my flowers and take good care of them...
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
23 Apr 07
I have some Trilliums which are a native to my area. I will also avoid weed eating things like yarrow which grows wild around here. It isn't good enough for a flower bed but on the edge of a woodland property it makes a nice touch.
• United States
22 Apr 07
sometimes i consider them a weed and sometimes I don't.I had them growing where we used to live and i went nuts trying to keep them from crowding out the other flowers. I was gonna see if i could grow them in a hanging basket but I don't know if they can grow in pots or not .
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
22 Apr 07
I am sure you can grow them in pots. They have a thick rhizome so make sure it does not get too wet and you should be fine.
1 person likes this
@playapal (894)
• United States
8 Jun 09
I'm sure that many people call them weeds but I personally love them. I was reading the previous comment about how the responder said that violets reminded him of his grandmother. Me too! They also remind me of when I was a little girl and would bring my Mom a handful of them and how beautiful she thought they were.
• United States
26 May 09
I think they are beautiful they remind me of my Grandmothers yard. Hers were basically like groundcover and I remember how much I loved picking them when I was a small girl. If you don't knwo what they are then one can assume they are a weed. But you know so many plants are transported by wind & animals it's hard to say where yours came from. I'm not sure where mine came from but they make me smile & think of my Grandmother when I see them.
• United States
1 Jun 07
I love violets. They are beautiful and they taste good too...
@irisheyes (4373)
• United States
7 May 07
They are such pretty little things, I hate to call them weeds even if they are all over the place. Most of the violets that grow wild around here are purple, which is lovely. However, I just discovered several clumps of white violets growing along side my driveway. I'm going to try to pull them up tomorrow and clump them under a tree in the back yard. I like them so much that I want to keep them even if they are weeds. "One man's weed is another man's flower" (That's not really a quote. I just made it up)
• United States
25 Apr 07
I don't know how they are classified, but they are pretty and usually colorful. Since they are quite prolific and grow everywhere I guess many would call them weeds. They seem to be the type of flowers that grow precisely where you don't want them to grow. They are pretty, but I still run over them with the lawn mower and they manage to come back every time.
• United States
23 Apr 07
I'm with you in that i consider anything growing where it is unwanted a weed. but I happen to like violets. and if some popped up in my flower bed, I'd probably leave them. or move them to a different spot where they could fit into the design.
@Wanderlaugh (1624)
• Australia
23 Apr 07
They can be both. They can do some irritating things to the color scheme, though, so personal tastes should get some consideration. One thing in their favor is that they take up space that would let in real weeds. As you say, they're good ground cover. I find that with any uninvited flowering plant, it usually works to allow them to operate as band aids on difficult patches, where the garden plants are having trouble establishing.