Is declawing a cat bad??

@bronie123 (4589)
United States
May 4, 2007 9:38am CST
Someone told me that it makes there paws very senstive and make them hurt if you have this dont to your cats ?? What are your opinions ??
3 people like this
9 responses
• United States
4 May 07
You just have to try to train your cat not to scratch on the furniture. They are always going to want to claw something, it is what they do. If you see your cat scratching the furniture tell it no in a firm voice. When I catch my kitten scratching the couches I tell him no then bring him to his scratching post which is in the same room. Then I gently rub his paws on it and he gets the idea and starts clawing the post instead. Just yelling at them to stop doesn't help too much because they are always going to have the instinct to scratch so make sure you give your cat an alternate. My other cat was declawed, but this was when I was 7 and didn't know. Now that I found out what they would do, I would never get my kitten declawed.
2 people like this
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
4 May 07
Thank very much for responed to both of my post your infomation is VERY helpful :)
@nancygibson (3737)
• France
4 May 07
I have never understood whay anyon ewould declaw a cat. If an indiidual isnt prepared to accept an animal for what it is, then they shouldnt keep it, simple as that. Training ois one thing, but a cat was born with claws and we have no right to much about with that. I feel neutering is a good idea as otherwise there would be many unhomed kittens, but declawing is only for our benefit and does nothing good for the cat at all.
1 person likes this
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
4 May 07
I accept my cat I love my cat i just hate it scrating on our $3000 dollar furniture thats all and can't figure ok how to get her to stop
@whywiki (6070)
• Canada
4 May 07
Why anyone would declaw their cats is beyond me. It is cruel and unusual punishment to an animal that just wants love and to give love. Claws are a cats natural defense. Take away their claws and you've taken a part of them that they need to defend themselves. A lot of people think it is okay as long as they are indoor cats, I don't think it is okay any time. What if a cat gets out and needs to defend himself and can't. It is cruel.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
4 May 07
I don't think im going to go with this option either but i have to do something about this furniture thing we have suewed sofa's and my cat is tearing them up :(
1 person likes this
@gizmo528 (732)
• United States
5 May 07
We've had both of our cats front claws removed but we did leave the back claws. They haven't had any trouble at all with their paws and they are not overly sensitive to anything as far as we can tell. It's a good idea to have them declawed if they aren't going to be outside pets. The only reason we left the back claws intact was because the oldest cat goes outside occasionally but the youngest doesn't but we don't feel any need to have them removed.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
5 May 07
ohh so your cats haven't had a problem that what i was worried about with the declawing thanks
1 person likes this
@gizmo528 (732)
• United States
14 May 07
Yup, sure am happy. I would do it again to. Happy posting.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
21 May 07
hummmm well im was just asking i have never seen a cat that has been declawed before i just heard some stuff thought word of mouth
1 person likes this
@Calais (10900)
• Australia
4 May 07
To me I think declawing is a lazy option to actual teaching cats not to claw at the furniture.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
21 May 07
why lazy??
@Calais (10900)
• Australia
21 May 07
I have seen it plenty of times. You have to be constantly watching the cat and onto it as soon as it is going for the furniture. From what I have seen seen, they are alright for the first couple of times, then they turn a blind eye or just cant be bothered any more. I know everyone is different, but this is just what I have seen and it seems to be very common.
1 person likes this
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
22 May 07
oh well im just haven't a clue how to make my cat stop my methods were not helping
• United States
4 May 07
There can be serious complications from the surgery to declaw a cat. Basically, they cut off the first knuckle of the cat's toe to do it. Some cats are fine after the operation, but others can have problems ranging from sensitivity, infection (which often makes them stop using the litter box because the litter irritates the wounds), and lameness. Plus, if your cat ever gets outside, it is almost defensless against other animals. Most people think it is not worth the risk of the complications of surgery when you can usually train a cat out of most of his/her inappropriate clawing behaviors. I didn't and wouldn't declaw my cat. I figure if you want to have a pet in your life, there are accomodations you have to make, like hair on your clothes, cleaning up after it and the occasional clawed chair. :-)
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
4 May 07
Ok that opition has left my head LOL I will just trim them or something :).
1 person likes this
• United States
5 May 07
Bringing a scratching post into the same room so that it is an easy alternative for the cat is a first step. Don't put it right next to the couch though, that might confuse the cat. Then try rewarding the cat every time you see him use the post (with food or something he really likes). Keep a spray bottle handy for when he goes for the couch, say "no" or make a hard sound (we usually make an "ach!" sound so there is no confusion as to what we mean), and then squirt him once or twice with the water (make sure it is set to "stream" and not "spray" a nice misting will not make much impression on him. In the meantime, try hanging a heavy blanket over his favorite scratching spots to passively discourage him as well. Good Luck.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
5 May 07
I have been hanging some pant or other items on the side of the arms so that it hangs over where she scratches and she didn't scratch on them (while we were here anyway LOL) Im going to have to go to petsmart this weekend
• United States
27 May 07
No one who truly loves their cat would ever have them declawed. It seems easy and makes a sweet pet into an even nicer less furniture damaging one. However, if you declaw your cat I truly hope you never let it outside by accident. Especially, if you have dogs in the neighborhood. Good luck with your cat surviving a doggy encounter when it cant CLIMB anything anymore. Ever see a declawed cat try to climb a tree.. it's incredibly sad.
• United States
27 May 07
It' always confused me when people ask if it hurts the cat to have themselves declawed. How do you think it'll feel after you remove the first knuckle on every part of their paws. How would you feel if you have the first knuckle of each of your fingers taken off? It's the exact same thing. They'd be sensitive and easily injured, plus you'd be maimed for life and have people look at your oddly.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
28 May 07
yeah i am sure it hurts to a point but does it continue to hurt and bother them over time thats what i was trying to find out
• United States
27 May 07
it is very painful for cats.There are some veternarians that actually have refused to do them. I was recently having problems with my kitty scratching me so I bought what are called vinal claw covers.It comes with a special glue.You put the glue in the cover and put it on the claws and it lasts for a month.the pack i buy comes with 40 so I have a 4 month supply.I don't put them on his back claws as he needs to scratch himself
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
28 May 07
cool i will look for them when i go to petsmart next time
• United States
5 May 07
you might wish to check into an alternative- claw caps.they're covers a vet can attach that keeps them from doing destruction. no surgery involved.it just looks like they have painted nails.
@bronie123 (4589)
• United States
5 May 07
neat i haven't heard of them before i will have to look into that :)