How to graduate with Honours 1. GET AHEAD OF THE GAME

Canada
May 15, 2007 1:29am CST
Since there are many subscribers to myLot who are either currently doing undergraduate studies or are planning to do so I thought a series on study tips would be useful. As a summa graduate I have some authority in this area. As time allows therefore I will post some guidance in a series. Here's the first. GET AHEAD OF THE GAME It's truly amazing how many students turn up at the first class without a clue as to the course material. Don't be one of these. Well before that day comes make sure you are familiar with the course. Any steps you take in this direction will pay off handsomely. You'll be able to relate to the course immediately and won't take the usual few weeks to realize what's going on. Here's what to do. 1. Read the course description several times. If you don't understand a word look it up in the dictionary. This way you will already have the beginnings of a subject's vocabulary when you begin. 2. Following from the above, go and get yourself a dictionary in the subject. You should always make a point of doing this for every subject you take. There are dictionaries out there for every subject under the sun, and some even for beyond the sun! Dictionaries of Sociology, Politics, Psychology, Economics etc. etc. Just do a search on Amazon.com or your fave bookseller. Browsing the dictionary of your subject will pay BIG dividends. Go the extra mile and look up the words that are linked within every definition; these are usually shown in CAPITALS. 3. Read an introductory book on your course topic before the course. Even one book will put you miles ahead and is easy to handle lying in your favorite sunny spot in summer, on the bus, on the train etc. If you're really intent on getting a First then browse as many of the set books you can during the run-up period. 4. And lastly, a bit of politics. Find out what the person who is teaching the course has written. This is easy with the internet. Get some idea of their work. Mentioning this in a class or seminar will get you points. Believe me, they'll love you for taking an interest. Most professors are fed up to the teeth with uninterested students. There, you are now on the road. Keep an eye out for the next item in this series.
2 responses
@takkea (394)
• United States
15 May 07
Thank you for the impact. I am going to apply this to my coursework and see of it works for me too. This is a very good approach and I believe I can be successful using it.
• Canada
16 May 07
Thank you! It will work for you. Best wishes for your studies. DDG
@takkea (394)
• United States
16 May 07
I need all the best wishes I can get especially for law school.
• Canada
17 May 07
Read some lives of great lawyers; it will inspire you. With a subject as dry as Law the trick is to set it on fire with passion. As a young man I wanted to study Law and spent much time in the local Court of Sessions. (I believe it was the Court in which the famous definition of negligence involving the 'reasonable man' definition was set down in x v. Birmingham Waterworks...??). "Negligence is the doing of that which a reasonable man would be expected not to do or the failure to do that which a reasonable man would be expected to do." Not exact, but from memory 50 years ago! Go for it. DDG
• Philippines
15 May 07
Pretty good suggestions you have there (not just for social sciences courses). I hope the information you've provided would be of help.
• Canada
16 May 07
Thanks; yes, the approach is applicable to any area of study. e.g., I haven't looked at a dictionary of Physics lately bu compared to what 'we' had years ago I can imagine any such would be a wonderful resource. Being an old man, I forgot that many of these resources are now on the net; not to mention the CD's that would have saved me so much sweat with mathematics and physics (which I did for my first two years before switching to philosophy and economics). Good luck with the studies. DDG