Burecracy in your country........

@laltu86 (1253)
India
May 20, 2007 5:32pm CST
I dont know about your country or state, but mine is very best at that, sorry for the joke, i am being sarcastic because I had to jump from one dest to the other whole two days and after two days i found myself in the same spot as i was two days ago. Let me explain I was out of station for a few days and in the mean time our wxamination form was submitted, so i was unable to do so, so when i returned my college authorities asked me to go to kolkata (our university ) and fill my form, whih i complied to the fullest, i rushed to the station and got the first train that i could and after a grusome journey of 4 hours when i reached the university that evening i was told that the officer has gone, though it was still 4:30pm and the office closes on 5, ok with a heavy heart full of tension i went back to my friends home where i passed the night, next day i was there at 9:30am as the office starts from 10,simply to find out that he will come at 11, i cursed the day when i was out and was unable to submit my form. At last i finaly got the opertunity to meet the concellor of examination, I though my problem is solved, but it was just the begining, then i started my run from one desk to the other i cannot explain my anger, my depresion and the other feelings i was having at that moment, at last, they nailed my form as ther was a stam missing and i was dumb struck to found that my two days labour was going down the drains aimply because of a missing stamp.I had the worlds greatest days, hope no one else had to go through this.Sorry for my sarcasam, but i though it right to share my feelings with my friends, whom else can i go to now....
2 people like this
3 responses
@arsena (293)
• Germany
21 May 07
I think bureucracy in any country is like that, I mean stinks. I come from Romania and there it is simply horrible. everytime I had a bureucratic problem I got I lot of stress. Now I live in Germany and the situation is pretty similar. A lot of very important people who let you wait for ever for a small paper and treat you like s..t.
1 person likes this
• India
21 May 07
Laltu, My fullest sympathies. Since I am from Kolkata, I have every experience of what you described just now. I don’t think anywhere in the world, such apathy and such indiscipline exists. As I have often said, I love this nation, but not its people. We (specially govt. employees) have become such bunch of loafers, its useless to expect any proactive initiations from us. And being a part of every union possible, the situation of govt. employees in West Bengal I think is worst that all states of India. Just the other day, I was on board a govt. bus. I wanted to get down at a particular stop, but the driver (he is another govt emplyee) just dragged the bus onto the next stop. When I protested, instead of apologizing, I bluntly told me to get off, or else he will take to further down the road. Where else do you face such rude and ill-mannered govt employees, whose very pay comes from our taxes? So you see, this disease of not caring for people whom you serve, has affected all rungs of our govt employees, right from bus drivers and conductors, to university employees. I don’t think there is any hope for ordinary citizens.
1 person likes this
@deepti15 (1190)
• India
21 May 07
It is really really sad, to know what happened with you. But then in India, it is the way, we have to face it everyday. Small or big, harder or even tougher. The amount of effort that you have to put in opening a bank account in a state-government run bank is equally painful. Once I went there in a bank, a lady was sitting there, I told her that I need to open an account and that I need a form for the same. She was not doing anything, just sitting idle, but then too she said come after one hour. Now what was this. I urgently wanted to open the account but she was just not ready to give an ear to my request. Finally she had to listen to some beautiful words, which I did not wanted to use at the first place, but could not help. The day-to-day functioning of the government is performed by permanent ministries and other public service agencies. These are led by members of the Indian Administrative Service and other specialized services, who are chosen by competitive examination. Rules of recruitment and retirement and conditions of service are determined by the Union Public Service Commission (or, for state governments, by state public service commissions). There has been a steady proliferation of agencies and growth in the size of the bureaucracy since independence, with a concomitant increase in regulations, which often impede—rather than facilitate—administration. As in many countries, bribery and the use of personal connections are often the key to obtaining action on specific issues at all levels of government.