Baby Gift For New Boss?

United States
May 25, 2007 11:57am CST
I am in an awkward situation. Very recently (just a few weeks ago) a new senior manager was assigned to our department. His wife just had a baby this week and now an e-mail has gone out asking for $$ for a gift card from Babies R' Us to give to him and his wife. I am normally the first to pitch in for baby shower gifts, but in the past, it's always been for women who work directly in our department and who I have known for at least a few months. Should I have to shell out $10 for a gift?
2 people like this
2 responses
• Canada
25 May 07
In my opinion this should be something you are allowed to decide on your own , I don't believe it should be expected of you to do this but something each person in the office decides on his or her own . Not everyone can afford to just dish out money everytime something is going on and it is expecting a lot to assume or expect everyone in the office to help out . The way it has always been where I worked was that anyone who wanted to help out could and if not then that was fine also . I believe you should only do this if this is something you want to as a way to be nice to someone else but if in any way you don't feel right about this or you are tight for money then you need to take care of your family . Best of luck in whatever you decide :)
1 person likes this
• United States
25 May 07
Thanks so much for your comments. I decided to pitch in $5 rather than $10. And I signed the card with a John Hancock-esque size signature.
@anonymili (3140)
25 May 07
It is totally up to you whether or not you want to contribute towards the gift. It is a gift from the department and as such, it really shouldn't be compulsory for people to throw in $10 each especially as you hardly know this guy. When I started my current job I had been there a week when a collection went round for a guy who'd just got engaged. I was asked to sign the card but told I didn't have to contribute as I was only new and barely knew the guy but I contributed £5 regardless as I wanted to fit in and I was able to give £5 without it being a problem for me. Some people give £20 in collections for weddings or baby presents but as I said it's really up to you, you shouldn't feel bad if you can't afford to put in $10 or even if you don't want to - if you can put in $5, then that could be your gesture of goodwill towards the new manager. No one will be counting or making a list of who puts in how much, not in my experience anyway. I've met guys who've been earning more than double my salary but only put in £2. I don't hold it against them, it all counts towards the final gift that is purchased. Hope you find a way out of your dilemma :)
• United States
25 May 07
Around here, the deal is if you don't pitch in, you don't get to sign the card....ridiculous I know. So I did pitch in because it might have looked weird to my new manager if I didn't sign the card.
1 person likes this
@anonymili (3140)
4 Jul 07
Well glad you found a way to chip in money without it costing you too much but it's weird that they don't let you sign if you don't put money in! I organise the birthday cards in our office (we don't collect for birthday cards) and leaving gifts and wedding, baby, etc. There are some guys who don't even put in £1 who will sign the card and some put in £20 but the person receiving the gift/card will never know who put in what because it's only me who knows and I would never tell! Thanks for the BR on this, much appreciated :)