Freezing Tomatoes?

United States
May 29, 2007 5:50pm CST
Can anyone give me tips or tricks on freezing tomatoes? How long can they remain in the freezer? What to do with them when they come out of the freezer? A friend has offered to give me tomatoes all summer long, and some will be coming soon. Any ideas?
4 people like this
8 responses
• United States
29 May 07
I didn't know you could feeze tomatoes, its a new idea to me. I'd think you could freeze them sliced or cubed, I think that it would last for a while in the freezer. You'd be best to use them soon, like withing a month or two of freezing you know. I think that you could also smash them into sauce and freeze, or you could boil them and make them stewed tomatoes.
2 people like this
• United States
28 Jun 07
I have since tried this and the results were amazing! I will continue to freeze tomatoes whole, because they tasted so fresh!
• United States
28 Jun 07
I have been freezing them for 20 years. I will never can them again. The quality is so much better and it's so much easier with way less mess. I believe it's also less expensive. You use them for everything you use canned tomatoes for. Whatever you want, you can make spaghetti sauce, use them for chili etc.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Jun 07
Yes, as I've found out, this will also be my method. So much easier than all the steps of canning...
@sherrir101 (3670)
• United States
16 Jun 07
I freeze tomatoes. All sizes. I have kept them up to 8 months or so. I use them fast because there is nothing like a fresh tomato in a casserole in the wintertime.(Great in Goulash!) YUM
• United States
16 Jun 07
You know, goulash sounds yummy!
• United States
30 May 07
i have also froze whole cherry and pear tomatoes.i just put them in freezer bags and popped them in the freezer.they are best used in stews and/or soups after that,but not very good to just thaw and eat
• United States
5 Jun 07
I did pop some in the freezer, whole, about 4-5 inches in diameter. I took them out and put them in water, and the skins peeled right off! Then, I made homemade spaghetti sauce with them. It was perfectly scrumptious!
@polachicago (19077)
• United States
30 May 07
Tomatoes should be washed before freezing. Wet each tomato with water, rub its surface, rinse it with running water, and dry it with a paper towel. Place the tomatoes on cookie sheets and freeze. Once frozen, transfer the tomatoes from the cookie sheets into freezer bags or other containers. Seal tightly. Frozen vegetables should be eaten within about 8 months for best quality.
1 person likes this
@tinamwhite (3255)
• United States
29 May 07
I have never heard of freezing tomatoes...we always can them in quart jars.....they can stay good for many many years this way....go to your local grocer and ask him about canning jars...it will contain the jar, a ring, and a seal....it will also give you directions on how to can tomatoes.... Good luck...
• United States
11 Jul 07
I don't know how to connect one member to another but villageanne has started a program in her community that teaches people not only how to grow and care for a garden; but also how to preserve the vegetable afterward. She is a font of information on any vegetable subject you can come up with ~Donna
• United States
12 Jul 07
Thank you, that is very useful information!
@wdiong (1818)
• Singapore
17 Jun 07
Freezing whole tomatoes with peels: Select firm, ripe tomatoes for freezing. Sort the tomatoes, discarding any that are spoiled. Wash them in clean water. Dry them by blotting with a clean cloth or paper towels. Cut away the stem scar. Place the tomatoes on cookie sheets and freeze. Tomatoes do not need to be blanched before freezing. Once frozen, transfer the tomatoes from the cookie sheets into freezer bags or other containers. Seal tightly. To use the frozen tomatoes, remove them from the freezer a few at a time or all at once. To peel, just run a frozen tomato under warm water in the kitchen sink. Its skin will slip off easily.
• United States
18 Jun 07
Your response is very similar to polachicago's response.