I have a lot more education than my husband, but...

@susieq223 (3742)
United States
May 31, 2007 10:48pm CST
he is so much smarter than I am about practical, everyday matters. It makes me wonder sometime why I went to school so long. Of what value is it? I do think education is valuable to a certain point, but I wonder about getting degrees above what we call high school here in the states. What do you think. Is an advanced education or degree valuable?
7 people like this
15 responses
@brendalee (6086)
• United States
1 Jun 07
There is a saying that comes to mind when I read your discussion and that is "being book smart but street stupid". No I am not calling you stupid, its just part of the saying. I know many people who are like this. There is nothing wrong with having an advanced education but I believe that more courses in common everyday things should be offered. In my town's school, they have a class called life skills. It teaches the kids about these everday issues. I think there should be more of thses kinds of classes.
3 people like this
• Philippines
1 Jun 07
the regular education that we have been getting is geared towards making everyone more knowledgeable. so we study and learn about the compiled knowledge from the past till the present. and as to how we can apply it to our present day activities. to be street smart is different. as it goes, 'common sense is very uncommon', so it will greatly help if classes about people becoming street smart will really be helpful. i agree with you that it will be good, really good if classes on life skills will be conducted widely.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
When I taught high school, I was supposed to teach a course on economics. I looked at the students in my class, many of whom were from families on welfare assistance, and decided to teach them budgeting, instead.
• Philippines
2 Jun 07
thats a great idea i wish some people here in the Philippines could teach classes like that . . most people just go by the streets and don't know of being practical and seem to get lost sometimes. It would be really helpful here, surely some of them are experts in their own way but they don't have to limit themselves on just that.
@Spagman (49)
• United States
1 Jun 07
Its sad but true....a degree will always be necessary to aim for better paying jobs. It doesnt matter how "street smart" you are....if you dont have that piece of paper you're not getting to far in a career. I guess in a relationship both the "being practical" hands on type and the intellectual "book smart" type evens out the relationship..... each compensates for the lacking half.
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
I thank God for that all the time! I don't know what I would have done without my husband all these years!
@jewel102 (105)
• United States
12 Jun 07
I think if you can have the change and opportunity to study don't let it pass. The more you study the more changes you have. Unfortunetly, in this society if you don't have the diploma you doesn't have any good changes. Is hard sometimes for the ones that have a good education find a good job, can you imagine for the ones that doesn't have any education or just high school. I told from my experience, I had an Associate Degree in Management with a concentration in Secretarial Science and about 12 years experience, but since a left my country (Puerto Rico) about 7 years ago, I applied here for several jobs related from what I studied and no luck at all! I probably do better cleaning houses...
@charms88 (7546)
• Philippines
1 Jun 07
I know what you mean, susie. This is also the same question that's been at the back of my mind for so long. I have a degree in Dental Medicine but it seems like a chapter of my life that had long ago folded up. Dentistry is not a chicken course. I went through sleepless nights, countless numbers of coffee to help me stay awake, gruesome lessons and exams, working out my sweat and blood just to finish all my requirements at dental clinic. Before I graduated, there was an announcement that all aliens were not allowed to take the board exams. 6 years of efforts and dreams ended up with a piece of diploma. I kept telling myself I just chose the wrong course. Why not something more practical and easier like computer engineering or even a 2 years secretarial course will do. I don't have to waste so much of my time. Having a degree can only give you some form of respectability from the society. But there is more to life than having a diploma tucked under your sleeve.
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
You do understand! That must have been devastating, to have the rug pulled out from under you like that! You seemed to have worked through it and made a life for yourself, though. I was luckier. I did use the education I got, but I never got paid much for it. Like I told someone else, I don't regret my choices, but I probably wouldn't advise someone else to follow my path!
@charms88 (7546)
• Philippines
2 Jun 07
Me too susie. Right now, I am always in tuned with what's the most demanding jobs available in the market. I like to train my girls to take a course that will benefit them. But I will not stop them from whatever course they will choose in the future.
• United States
1 Jun 07
I have a G.E.D..The Principal said that he would have me arrested if I showed up on school ground the next day,so I droped out.I have gone to 3 different colleges and quit them with 1 or 2 credits left to grad.The only degree that I have gotten was in paste-up arts,which is obsolete now thanks to computers.Have a lot of degrees that I have "learned"on the street,none of them that you can put on a resume,only apply them to your life.I added up all of the stuff(credits and such,years spent)and figure that I have a Masters,so I guess now I am working on my Doctate.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
Well, there is an old saying that at BS is "Bu!!-Shi!", the MS is "More Shi!" and the Ph.D. is "Piled Higher and Deeper! I'm so full of it I could be Ph.D.!
• United States
2 Jun 07
Education is a way to make money for people(teachers)who dont have the physical capabilities to learn a trade.They "think",not do,they tell others how to do from their education. A degree helps in that you are showing(piece of paper)that you have "suffered"thru how ever many years and paid for it.Interesting isnt it? One of my High school teachers said that to the class.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
1 Jun 07
Well having higher education degrees seems to have a value in the job market for some reason, I mean lets face it, most employers will favor a college-educated person to hire over someone that only graduated high school. I actually loved my college years--hated my high school years with a passion, but loved college...maybe since I could choose what I wanted to study..and I have a love for learning..but I seem to have the best of both worlds...I have a lot of education under my belt, and I was the first and only in my family to graduate college..but I'm also one of those "practical" ones who can problem solve everyday mundane things--like adjusting the clock on the VCR--hehehe--okay this is sort of off topic...has to do with that VCR of mine...out of curiosity, I wanted to see how far in years the time went...meaning the date and years....it goes all the way to 2020!! My kind of optimistic to think the VCR will last that long--LOL
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
In some vocations you have to have more education. In my case, however, my job as a Mental Health Counselor never paid for my master's degree. I started out working or $18,000 in 1990!. Never got above 23,000! Garbage haulers and auto mechanics were making a lot more money than I. It was my choice, of ocurse. I really don't regret getting my education or choosing to be in a low paying job, but I don't know that I would advise anyone else to do it! I loved college and hated my high school years, too!
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
1 Jun 07
You hated high school, and loved college.....this is eerie how much we're alike...are you sure your not a sister of mine or something??
1 person likes this
• India
12 Jun 07
education gives a person a direction of thinking.... but there are some persons who are exceptionally talented and do not depend on education, though the number of such persons is very less...... and i believe your husband is one of those persons.... you are very lucky to have a husband like this.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
13 Jun 07
I agree. Thanks.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Jun 07
I have often wondered the same thing. Unless we need a BA and MA for a specific profession, why? Reading, writing, and math is enough. Especially computer skills now. Education doesn't mean one is smart.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
13 Jun 07
You are sure right about that. Some of the stupidest people I know have a lot of advanced education!
@RenaeT (688)
• United States
3 Jun 07
I think it's valuable in that it shows commitment to something, the stick-to-itiveness of going through the rigorous classes, homework, finals, etc. . . . My husband and I both work in a higher education environment and we see the growth both spiritually, mentally and cognitively in these kids as they progress through their college years. So, the life experience may be more valuable than the classes they go through! I think it is valuable even if it's only because many places now require a degree to get a job whether it is in that field or not. They just want someone with something that shows they have a level of commitment to something to stick it out. Does that make sense?
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
3 Jun 07
It does make sense. And you are right that it takes commitment to get that degree!
@netbuster (100)
• India
2 Jun 07
It is really nice of you to accept something like this. I feel that any education after the basic high school should be directed towards what one is good at. If I were good at say sports then I pursue advanced studies in that and make a living out of it.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
3 Jun 07
If what you were good at required advanced studies, then it would be worth it. Some things, I think, do not require a degree or book learning to excel.
• United States
2 Jun 07
That is how it is in some relationships. Someone is book smart and someone is common-sense smart. It is a good balance. Do not feel so bad, be proud of yourself for earning those degrees, and appreciate that your husband is a smart man as well. You two complement each other. That is a good thing.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
3 Jun 07
You are right. Thank you.
@nandhinir (154)
• India
1 Jun 07
In general girls are book worms..while i schools or colleges girls will be leading always...But in practical life guys are so smart than us..Am not blaming girls..I am also a girl...But this is the fact which has to be accepted...
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
I don't entirely agree with you, but I will accept the fact that in general men do seem much smarter in some areas. Thanks for your reply.
@melanie652 (2526)
• United States
1 Jun 07
I have more education than my husband. He has the better paying job and I've been a stay at home mom! I think an advanced education is still valuable though. My hubby has been working on getting his bachelors degree. His boss even recommended he finish his education.
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
In many cases it is valuable. I hope it proves to be cost effective for your husband. I'm so glad you are able to be a stay-at-home Mom! That is the hardest and the most important job of all!
• United States
1 Jun 07
I am in somewhat the same situation, and I will tell you with the 43 years of experience I have at this marriage that I would a lot rather have his sense than any degree in the world. I have learned a whole lot from my husband, his practicality is so awesome. When I finally got smart enough to ask him to help me learn from him, he very patiently has explained to me things like how to look, to really look, at things and think! An example---and this will probably throw you for a minute---but when I was injured in an auto accident, now having a lot of pain, balance problems and severe issues with my knees------- I FEARED steps, but almost all steps, stairways have hand rails, going up is relatively easy, coming down is the problem. the solution??? come down backwards!!! hanging onto that railing, moving slowly and carefully. If my knees 'give' I fall forward, forward onto the step above instead of head over heels down. Anyhow------learn all you can from you husband.
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
Thank you. I try to. He is a wonderful man, but not a very patient teacher, when it comes to trying to get stuff through this thick head. I hope your recovery continues to go well.
@AmbiePam (46881)
• United States
1 Jun 07
Maybe he has the street smarts, but you have the academic smarts. You can't be one person who has it all, or else there wouldn't be a reason to be married. Your degree has a purpose. You take all your experiences and have a wealth of knowledge for anyone who asks or needs it. Your husband has the same thing, only his experiences are different. Since you both bring different things to the table, you make a heck of a unit. : )
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
But I want it all!!!!! Thanks, your answer makes a lot of sense.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
1 Jun 07
you should not feel bad that you have received a good education. and as you say, it is a much better one than what your husband have had. you should be thankful instead. education can make us well informed in the field where we had studied. your husband is smarter than you because he is. it is a natural talent. wisdom is God-given and it is something which we can never learn in school. if ever you want your wisdom to be enhanced, ask for it from the Lord in your prayers, if it gets granted, good for you. if it is otherwise, be humbled and accept your present state...be happy that you have for yourself a smart and wise husband.
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
1 Jun 07
I am very greatful for the smart, good-looking, great man I married! I am also grateful for my education; I was able to use it in my work. I do think my education has enriched my life, but I wonder if the immense amount of money spent on all those years was really worth it? I wonder that not for my benefit, but for the younger generation. I don't know what I would advise them about it.