What are you allergic to?

@ladyluna (7004)
United States
June 6, 2007 11:29am CST
Sneezing, sniffles, puffy eyes, hives or full-fledged anaphylactic shock? Is it Fido, or Fluffy? Or maybe the floating dandelion pollen, or dust mites or mold. Do you have food allergies, or intolerances? Or something less common? To what are you allergic, and how do you treat the symptoms, if and when you're exposed?
4 people like this
5 responses
@emeraldisle (13158)
• United States
7 Jun 07
I'm allergic to many things sadly but only bee/wasp stings, iodine or sulfas do I have to worry immedietly about. Iodine and sulfas are the big problems because they are hidden in so many things. I do have some food allergies that can be dangerous. Liver and/or oysters will cause my throat to try and close when I try to eat them. We had first thought it was just cow liver but it turns out it's all liver. Found out after trying some goose liver pate. I'm also allergic to many flowers. Some can cause it where my lungs will shut down in a full asthmatic reaction, gardenias in particular. Others just cause my head to explode with pain and my nose to stuff up. There are more that cause the simple eye itching and such but I think I've said enough. Right now I'm thinking I should be in a plastic bubble.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
7 Jun 07
Oh Emeraldisle, I'm so sorry that allergies have such a pervasive impact on you. That is such a drag ... literally and figuratively. Thankfully, I'm not allergic to bee stings or Iodine (that is an unusual one, unless it's related to thyroid issues). Sulfa's are a biggie. I think many more people react to them than know. For me, it's just the headache and toxemic swelling. Megadoses of high quality fish oil are miraculous at relieving the edema. And, the liver is rather interesting. It makes me wonder if you're particularly sensitive to toxins, since the liver of any creature is the primary filter. Hopefully your awareness of the allergens that bother you will keep you out of that plastic bubble. I'm remineded of that very funny movie a few years back about a boy who grew up in a plastic bubble, who fell in love with the girl next door. He busted out of the bubble to prevent her from marrying her boyfriend, and found that he was fit as a fiddle. He encountered all manner of hilarious obstacles on 'the outside' that brought great volume of laughter. Anyway, I digress ... Be well my friend! And, thanks for sharing your allergies.
2 people like this
@emeraldisle (13158)
• United States
7 Jun 07
Part of my life and I've pretty much gotten used to it. Iodine in small doses can cause just the swelling or redness but too much and it causes more serious problems, same with the sulfas. I was in the hospital with pnemonia and they were giving me Albuteral Sulfate for breathing treatments. I didn't know the last part of it was Sulfate. On the third day the small amount had built up and I was boiling, having trouble breathing, etc. I found out and had to argue with the nurse, respitory tech and the pharmacist because they feel that just because you are allergic to Sulfa doesn't mean you are allergic to sulfate. Sulfa of some sort is in a lot of medications and also in soaps, shampoos, and so on. They all bother me, some take longer but eventually they do. Same with the iodine, many meds have it in one form or another in small amounts and it builds up and causes problems. I'm not sure what it is with the liver and oysters. I know peas can do it if there are enough of them. If it's just one or two mixed in it's not a big problem but I can't have split pea soup or a bowl of just peas. My throat will try to close. I don't know why. I didn't see that movie but I did see the original "Boy in the plastic bubble" with John Travolta.
2 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
8 Jun 07
You're so right Emeraldisle. Sulfa's are in all kinds of products. I'm sorry that you had to tangle with the nursing staff to get them to hear you about your sulfa reaction. The same thing happened to my mother, with morphine. She was allergic to it, and they gave it to her anyway. So, the moral of that story is to make sure that someone close knows all of your allergies. Or maybe even wear one of those life-saver bracelets. If you're ever hospitalized again, and are unable to speak, then it could save your life.
2 people like this
@charms88 (7546)
• Philippines
6 Jun 07
Hello luna. I was born with a lot of allergies. I inherited it from my maternal side of the family. When I was still in high school, I consulted an Allerologist and discovered the allergens I should avoid. Yellow food, dust mites, mosquitoes, animal furs, seafood, cow's milk and a whole lot more. I also had allergic rhinitis years ago but miraculously, it was healed when I lived and worked in another country. It was frustrating for me during my growing up periods. I needed to have antihistamines, ointments and nasal inhalers stocked up on my house. Last year, a friend suggested burdock root supplement which is a good herbal detox for blood. I took it for 3 months and was amazed that I had less attacked of allergies. Since then, I continue to take it as my daily supplement.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
6 Jun 07
Hello Charms, You have quite a number of allergies. Yellow food? That's an unusual one. Is it the yellow dye in food? I know someone who's rhinits disappeared when they moved away from the Pacific Shore. Maybe it's the salt in the air. Although, salt generally facilitates healing, though it can be irritating. Burdock huh? As a tea, or capsule? I've never taken Burdock for allergies. I'm severely allergic to dairy and gluten. So, thanks for the Burdock info. I'll definitely look into that!
@charms88 (7546)
• Philippines
6 Jun 07
Oh really. It must be doubly hard for you since you're gluten-intolerance. Is it related to celiac disease? My doctor told me that any yellow food like corn, egg yolk should be avoided. I'm still eating those particular food but rarely and in small serving only. I take burdock root in capsule form. Its easier and convenient for me. You might like to add flax seed and borage in capsule too. Both are wonderful in prohibiting any onset of allergies.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
6 Jun 07
Yes, it's Celiac. No big deal, I've been on a restricted diet for so long now that I don't even remember what most foods taste like. Especially desserts. What's creamy? What's moist cake? So, you're also restricted from natural yellow foods. That is an unusual one. Did your Doc offer any explanation? Thanks for the nutritional suggestions. I'll definitely look into Burdock. I do take Borage & high quality Omega 3's & 6's. And, you're right, they help alot. I've also found that Ume Plum paste, dissolved in boiling water helps to quickly counter an allergic reaction. For me, the biggest help though, is to take spirulina digestive enzymes before each meal, and steer clear of any packaged food. I will admit that I do still miss cheese danish. I haven't had one in over twenty years. That used to be my big weakness.
@filmbuff (2909)
• United States
7 Jun 07
I think a better qestion is to what am I *not* allergic to? I'm allergic to grass, dust, mold, weeds, cats, wool, and pretty much anything that is alive and green including most trees. Having asthma really doesn't matters much, because allergy attacks quickly become asthma attacks. If I am exposed to allergens, what I will try to do is take a shower as quickly as possible to get that stuff off of me. I also take claratin daily which does help as well using rescure inhalers when needed and advair on a daily basis.
@filmbuff (2909)
• United States
7 Jun 07
Something else that I neglected to mention is environment. Often the best way combat allergies to move to a dry environment. When I was in AZ, Nevada and even Colorado my allergies were not nearly as bad as living in a place like California or anywhere in the South or where it is very humid.
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@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
7 Jun 07
Good morning Filmbuff, Thanks for sharing. You're many allergies sound like a real challenge. Especially with asthma. Washing off airborne allergens, after exposure probably helps alot. And, you're right about drier climates being very helpful. I'm not troubled by airborne allergens, except in late Aug. or early Sept., when the Chamisa is in bloom. You may be familiar with Chamisa from your time in the Southwest. Fortunately, it's only in bloom for a couple of weeks. The other big allergen in the Southwest is Juniper. This year caused great suffering for many here. The Juniper was so active that the trees were absolutely covered with an orangish-brownish dust. Just brushing against the tree caused the passer-by to get dusted. There was an awful lot of Benadryl and Claritin flying off the store shelved during peak bloom. So, I'm glad that you weren't visiting here during that time!
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@filmbuff (2909)
• United States
7 Jun 07
My allergies were very, very bad, life threateningly bad when I was child. I have since built up some immunties via shots that I took for years as a child. I was however warned that in my thirties (which is now) I should expect a relapse and that they would probably be worse. So far I've been lucky in that regard. I evened owned a cat for a good 10 years.
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@whyaskq (7553)
• Singapore
10 Jun 07
I am allergic to cold hard cash. If I am exposed to any, I will try ways and means to get rid of it. At times, the itch was so great that I lost control over it. To cure it, I do not carry cash with me. Prevention is better than cure. lol.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
10 Jun 07
Very humorous Whyaskq! Yes, I can see how Benadryl or Claritin would have little remedy over the symptoms of this particular allergy.
1 person likes this
@whyaskq (7553)
• Singapore
10 Jun 07
That's why it is still an allergy to me :p
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@miamilady (4924)
• United States
7 Jun 07
I am allergic to dust mites, cats and dogs. I am more allergic to cats than I am to dogs. I have taken benadryl for my cat allergies. The other allergies, I really don't treat. I don't have a very bad reaction and when I start to have a reaction I just get away from the source. I also usually avoid cats. The only time I was in the habit of taking Benadryl was when I used to visit some friends who had cats. I would take a pill before I went to visit them if I rememered. Otherwise I HAD to take one when I left. I always had to cut my visits short in that case. My reaction to the cats was pretty bad.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
7 Jun 07
Hello Miamilady, It's nice to visit with you again as well. So, it would make sense that you would have neither a cat or dog at home. Is that the case? If so, I'll bet your little one's clammer for furry friends, not really understanding your allergy. Benadryl can do a fine job of preventing an allergic reaction. Though I wonder if you have the same reaction to Benadryl as I have ... zzzzzzzzzzzzzz! Wow, it really knocks me out.
1 person likes this