Tips for Cooking on an electric stove?

United States
July 2, 2007 8:23am CST
I have recently moved into a place with an electric stove, and I find I'm having a little trouble getting my cooking mojo going with it. While I did grow up with an electric stove, I haven't used one in years, the previous places I have lived had gas stoves. I know there are some benefits to cooking with electric, but I was hoping for some tips from those of you who are more used to using it. I have a glass flat top range if that helps too. Thanks so much!
1 person likes this
8 responses
• United States
2 Jul 07
The biggest tip I can give about cooking on an electric stove is that it seems to take longer to get ready to cook. With a gas stove, you still have to heat up a pan for some things (like scrambled eggs, for example), but with an electric stove, you have to get the burner to heat up AND the pan to heat up. It seems to me that it takes a little longer for this to happen with an electric stove. I really prefer an electric stove now, though. I grew up cooking on gas, but all of my apartments have had electric stoves.
• United States
2 Jul 07
Electric definately feels a bit safer. I've noticed it takes a little longer for the pant to heat up. I guess learning some patience will be good for me :-)
1 person likes this
@freak369 (4717)
• United States
12 Aug 07
Scary gives some very solid advice!
@creematee (2810)
• United States
2 Jul 07
hI TWILIGHT! I agree, gas is better to cook on, however, I've had an electric stove for the past 15 years. Mine, too is a smooth top, and the most important thing to remember, is make sure you are using flat bottom pans. Cast iron skillets are a BIG NO-NO for a glass top!!! Warped pans also don't cook evenly, and give you funny results. Electric stove also take longer to heat than gas. There isn't any "instant on." You also need to consider this when turning the temperature up or down. It takes a bit for the burner to heat or cool down. Not much, but it isn't the same result as gas. Just practice!!! Make some mac and cheese to get the hang of how burners work. Scramble and egg or try something simple (and cheap) to make. You'll get the hang of it!!! Best of luck and happy cooking!
• United States
2 Jul 07
Ooo...good to know about cast iron...since I have a cast iron skillet!
@freak369 (4717)
• United States
12 Aug 07
My only advice would be to invest in a good wok and do a lot of stir fry cooking. When we had an electric stove that was pretty much how I cooked everything - from Sloppy Joes to hamburgers, steaks to noodles. I got pretty creative with it lol!
@squaretile (3835)
• Singapore
8 Aug 07
is this a glass top induction hob? Cos I have an electric gas stove, as in the gas is piped in not from a cylinder. I guess that means that it is still gas instead of electric/ for induction hobs I've heard that it's great for heating up food. not so sure about cooking. since for chinese cooking direct flame is always best.
@wdiong (1818)
• Singapore
4 Jul 07
If you cook with electricity, turn off the burners on your stove several minutes before completing the allotted cooking time. Electric stoves use a lot of energy: maximize the use of your electric stove by cooking or baking several dishes at the same time. Match the cooking pot with the size of your burner. Turn down the burner when water reaches a boiling point. Never boil water in an open pan.
@diannebcrs (1549)
• Philippines
2 Jul 07
i grew up using gas stoves and when we had an electric stove it needed a little getting used to. for one, it takes time to heat things up. but actually you could make it work for you. in my case, our electric stove have labels for low heat, simmer, medium heat, medium high heat, and high heat. so for non experts who rely on cookbooks i find it handy so that i can put the stove to the required amt of heat coz some books would just tell you to put the heat to medium high, with gas stoves it's just like an estimate, like i base it on the size of the flame. i am a lousy cook but when i fry chicken this time, i just set it to low heat and it's well cooked - not burnt but not raw. so my cooking's a lot more consistent. also it takes a lot longer to cool down. i had to adjust to that as well. i guess it's just a matter of getting used to.
@myfanwy65 (1030)
• United States
2 Jul 07
I agree with the others, the main difference is the time it takes to heat up. An electric stove takes longer. It's been over 20 years since I cooked on a gas stove. I don't know if I could do it now, or not. I'm so used to an electric stove.
• United States
2 Jul 07
I cook alot of things on mid heat so it does not burn