What's your mother tongue? Is english your mother tongue?

@dsuesue (180)
China
July 2, 2007 11:00pm CST
My mother tongue is Chinese, I don't think it's easy to learn for a foreigner. My second language is English, I learn it over ten years, but it's still hard for me. What about you, what's your mother tongue?
5 responses
• India
3 Jul 07
my mother tongue is sindhi, but i can speak very well hindhi marathi and english.........
@cool614 (53)
• India
3 Jul 07
My mother tongue is Hindi too (seems quite popular here LOL) and my second language is English.
@stealthy (8188)
• United States
3 Jul 07
My native tougue is the US version of English. But actually it is almost a second language, I was late to start talking and when I did no one could understand me. My theory is that the connection between hearing and speaking in my brain was messed up, so everything got jumbled. So in effect I had my own language. Through a lot of speech therapy and just growing up with Engish, you can't tell that I had a problem. But I have a severe problem with learning other languages and even music was a problem for awhile in that I was a yong adult before I could synchronize with a beat without visual assistance.
• India
3 Jul 07
My mother tongue is Hindi. I can read, write and speak Hindi and English. I also speak regional language name chhattisgarhi. I was poor in english till class 11th. Then I decided to learn it by heart. I started first improving word power. I used to remember many words on daily basis. Whenever I found leisure time, I used to repeat that word with spelling. Then after few months I started learning basic grammer. It took me around 1 and 1/2 years to learn grammer completely upto graduation standard. Though I think even now I am weak in english so my effort is continue till date.
• Philippines
3 Jul 07
my mother toungue is tagalog, although the dialect i was born with is ilonggo (a visayan dialect). i understand what you mean. i have a chinese friend who studied college here in the philippines; she has trouble with english, too. especially in speaking it. i think it's because our tongues (literally) are accustomed to the movements they make when forming the words of our native languages; suddenly reverting to english takes lots of practice--it's like re-training the way our tongues move. don't give up; you'll get there someday! :)