How thrifty are you

Philippines
July 3, 2007 4:29am CST
I used to be so extravagant. But when I started bearing children and most especially when I put up my own small business, I had realized how important it is to learn how to cut expenses. I wont buy stuffs if I know how to make them. I stopped eating at restaurants and if there is type of food the family wants to have, we will prepare it together. I had learned the art of recycling. I dont just throw things away. I would try to check first if they can still be useful. I am actually doing so many things to help cut my expenses but I just mentioned some. How about you? What are your ways?
4 people like this
27 responses
@lkbooi (16102)
• Malaysia
5 Jul 07
If I have plenty of money in hand I could be rather extravagant but not wasteful. On the other hand if I’m not so well of I would try to be as thrifty as I could. To be thrifty I will consider properly what the necessary things to buy and I’ll get several quotations before I make the final decision. I prefer to take public vehicles rather than using my own car for outstation travel. Those household chores are preferred to be done by ourselves.
@mimpi1911 (25455)
• India
5 Jul 07
Oh! that's very good and wise of you sweetie. i really appreciate, just hope i could adopt bit from you. i am extravagant and spend like anything, most go ashtray. like i would buy 4-5 clothes, books instead of one and my luckier friends get an unexpected gift. i have been trying to cut down on my expenses and gave up my credit cards. it's kind of working, will take a while though.
• United States
5 Jul 07
About ten years ago, my spouse and I became very frugal people. At first it was very difficult, but over the years, we have simply learned to live without the extras. When I wanted a new living room furniture set, I simply ulpholstered our current couch/loveseat combo for a fresh look. We saved almost $1,000 by doing so. Most times frugal living is easier than being wasteful, because there is less worry and concern at night when you go to bed. Don't you agree?
@KrisNY (7609)
• United States
4 Jul 07
I am pretty frugal as well- Most times- I shop with coupons- and do rebates. I buy in bulk so that it’s a cheaper price. I also bring my lunch to work more instead of ordering out- I used to order almost every day- that is a big chunk of change- I purchase my soda in 12 packs and bring to work- Instead of paying $1 can in the vending machines- I also bring in snacks- We cut back in eating out at home- I do mylot for extra spending money for Christmas- This year I’m going to try to shop totally with gift certificates (that I have earned) and money made from internet sites. I love being frugal!
@ssh123 (31104)
• India
4 Jul 07
All along my life I have been spendthrift and it has landed me in trouble quite often. Fortunately my wife is very thrifty (excepting for buying for herself). Things seem to be ok.
• Malta
4 Jul 07
I am trying to save as much money as possible. i also stopped going to restaurants simply because they charge too much money. besides I like eating at home. There is always a good movie to watch while eating and whenin a restaurant you cannot watch anything.
@golfproo (1841)
• Canada
4 Jul 07
I think the key is not how much money you maek...but how much you spend. It is for that reason that I have tried to drastically reduce my expenses. I dont waste energy in the house and I stopped eating out for starters. It is amazing, but eating out cost me a fortune and I did not even realize it. cheers,
• India
4 Jul 07
The word extravagant is completely out of my sight at my earning stage.When i was with my parents i use to spend without knowing the value of money.May be i is their mistake of not showing me money value.But now iam so thrifty that i do not spend more for my luxuries.If i want something different to eat , i check website or read cooking book and prepare on my own.No more hotels.Few days back my fridge was out of service.I called for service for company and they said i have to change whole compressor. But again i went to a local Fridge mechanic and he said only the starting switch is in problem and i got it repaired with jus few hundreds and its running....What ever be it, either food, or furniture or travel...we should think twice before we spend.If not atleast ask our friends who knows about it and get it done. But at the same time you should be more careful that u spend worth it. It s not the cheap one...but it should be the best one.That is thriftness...
@syain1972 (1011)
• Singapore
4 Jul 07
When I was working, I used to be a little extravagant. I was able to buy anything that I like.... However, now that I am a full-time housewife, I've cut down a lot on unnecessary spendings and prefer to save for rainy days. Further to that, I would indulge more on healthy food for the family as health cost is getting too expensive and everything on the shelf now cost so much more.....
@Willowlady (10666)
• United States
4 Jul 07
Personally I never buy new if I can find it used or on sale. I will use coupons and price match. I shop at church rummage sales, library book sales and flea markets. There is a free clothing bank here in town. I belong to a freecycle group. Several really. I reuse all I can before throwing it away. My dish water is what I water the garden with. That is about it for me.
@sid556 (31019)
• United States
4 Jul 07
I am extremly thrifty but have to admit that as things get better financially, i do have to keep myself in check. There was a time that seems like yesterday but it was so long ago that all my girls were small and I was trying to raise them on just my small pay. The dad did not pay child support. Did you know that toilet paper can serve the same purpose as napkins and paper towels? You can actually live without a phone and cable tv? a car even? Heck, you can even live without hot water and still be very clean if you have to and we did. We did not have a bathtub where I lived at the time..just a shower stall. I purchased a huge,gigantic laundry tub. Each nite I placed it in the shower stall and heated water on the stove and gave my kids and myself a bath. It was a long process but we did it and how I appreciated running hot water once I got on my feet and was able to. I made curtains out of my old long hippy skirts . It was winter time and because I worked , I did not qualify for heating assistance. I could not afford oil delivery and so I bought diesel fuel and poured it into my tank. I was escaping an abusive marriage and doing the best I could. We take so much for granted. It was a very humbling experience and I learned so much. would not want to re-visit those times but am very greatful for the learning lesson. To this day, I still add a bit of water to the bottom of the dish soap to get every last drop. As you can see, I have worked my way up. Im communicating with you from my computer. I appreciate all that I have and I know first hand that if all this material stuff disapears tomorrow (and it could) i will survive.
@thyst07 (2091)
• United States
3 Jul 07
It's great to see all these moneysavers. I grew up with my grandparents and definitely learned to live a thrifty lifestyle. My grandma's motto is "use what you have." If you need something, figure out what you already have that can be adapted to the task- and don't go out and buy something new if you already have one that's just fine. Here are a few things I've learned to do to save money (and be a little more eco-friendly): -When you do laundry, line-dry as much as possible- especially towels. Towels tend to hold a lot of moisture, and it takes quite a bit of extra energy to dry them. Line-drying your clothing and towels will cut down on your electric bill (or the number of quarters you spend at the laundromat). -Wash most clothing on a cold cycle. Saves money on electricity again by not heating water, and most clothes wash just fine in cold. I only use warm for really dirty stuff. -Re-use grocery bags as trash can liners in smaller trash cans or for scooping kitty litter. -Don't use a lot of paper towels. -Let your hair air-dry and save on electricity. -Keep lights off when you don't need them. -Keep your shades closed against direct sunlight to keep your house cooler so you don't have to use your air conditioner as much. Anyway, that's quite a bit of stuff. Hope it helps some of you, and thanks all for the great tips already posted.
@bambi_doe (566)
• United States
3 Jul 07
I used to be a name brand buyer until I got married and my husband only bought off brand stuff and one day we had a challenge of who spent the leased and I spent $200 on groceries and he went to a discount food center where you bag your own and got the same things I got in off brands and only spent $78. Now I am convinced that off brand items are just as good as the name brands. I recycle bottles and cans and take them back to the store at 10 cents a peice also. I reuse the grocery bags for garbage and reuse leftovers in noodles or make a gravy with them or a soup. I use the plastic bags from grocery stores to store leftovers in in the refrigerator. I use dish soap for all my cleaning. Laundry I use deluted dish soap - floors the same and any other cleaning around the house. Dawn is the best but hubby found an off brand just like it for $1 at the dollar store. We shop the dollar stores first before any major grocery store. I make my own scratch pads from nylon and a crocete needle. I make my own bread and freeze it. We seek out farmers markets for veg and fruit. We even go to food auctions and buy food and other items. I melt down used bars of soap in water and make hand soap from them. I freeze and can fruit and veg in summer time for the winter when the stuff is so expensively priced. A friend of mine was given a list the other day with 125 uses for Avon bubble bath and I thought that was a super saver for around $7 a 24 oz bottle. I never buy paper towels either I just use a washcloth or kitchen towel and wash them when they get dirty. Hugs
• United States
3 Jul 07
i watch what I spend on everything. I use coupons, make things if I can. I don't like to eat out. But I have to do this stuff with two kids in the house.
@ryanphil01 (4187)
• Philippines
3 Jul 07
I buy only the things we badly needed for a 15-day budget before the next payout will be due.We are only three in the household so I still find it practical to buy prepared foods from small stores than cooking, considering the gas consumption. The price of a cylinder gas tank is exceedingly high as much as $12. When there are items in the house that needs to be repaired, I usually do them personally rather than having them fixed by someone except only about electrical appliances. Lately, we minimized our shopping and going out to malls and eat in fancy restaurants. We just buy ready made food stuff and bring them home. We stopped subscribing to hard copies of newspapers. We used to have newspaper deliveries at home. We just watch news update on TV.
• United States
3 Jul 07
I am a supersaver. I cut coupons and go to places like Dollar Tree, Big Lots,etc. It is amazing how you can get things dirt cheap. I love it!
@derek_a (10904)
3 Jul 07
I am the same. I always try to fix my computer if it goes wrong when sometimes I just feel like upgrading and buying a new one. I'm really into DIY and will do all in my power to fix something and avoid calling a technician in. Last week our central heating/hot water pump broke and I fitted a new one - it cost me £50 (English pounds) and standard charge from a technician would have been over £200. I had another leak to sort out at the same time, that cost me just a few pennies for a new washer. There's a saying in the UK - Watch the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves. There must be a similar saying in other countries in their own currencies :-)
@tala91285 (1080)
• Philippines
3 Jul 07
I've always been practical ever since I can remember so I never lived beyond my means. If a hundred pesos is all that I have, then I maximize that hundred by either saving it for something in the future or buying something that I want immediately that would not exceed one hundred. Like you, I recycle a lot of stuff that I could still use. It's better to have something saved for a rainy day ^_^
@fly_shay (333)
• Philippines
3 Jul 07
When I was still a student, I don't know the value of money yet.If i wanted to buy something, I would really buy it once I have the money.But now that I'm married, it's the opposite.Just like you, I also learned how to cut my expenses.I even find ways and means on adding something to my income like selling plastics that I've collected and tutoring pupils.Though I still don't have a baby,but the expenses are growing.So I guess, i have to go on.
@charms88 (7546)
• Philippines
3 Jul 07
Hello hersmart. It is always a general feeling that we are force to cut down our expenses after we started our own family. I still splurge from time to time which I deemed as a reward for all my effort. There are only 3 people including me in the house and our expenses is still within the budget. For old items and clothings, I normally donate it to the charity. Instead of buying branded staff on the grocery, I will browse through the aisle and look for local brand that has the same quality as that of the branded names.