Do you think that milk is a complete food?

@dbhattji (2507)
India
July 6, 2007 11:27pm CST
It is said that milk is a complete food, meaning it contains all the ingredients required for our health but yet we can not survive on milk alone. There are people here who have lived on milk alone. Do you think it is possible for you to do the same ? Do you add supplements to milk ?
1 person likes this
3 responses
@ryanphil01 (4186)
• Philippines
16 Jul 07
As a food, milk serves the following purposes: (1) growth, (2) reproduction, (3) supply of energy, (4) maintenance and repair and (5) appetite satisfaction. The requirements of these categories differ with the individual, and in some instances not all the stated functions of the food need to be served, e.g. adults no longer require food for growth whereas infants do. The functions of a food are served specifically through the various nutritionally important components, comprising proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, vitamins and water. Nutritionally, milk has been defined as "the most nearly perfect food". It provides more essential nutrients in significant amounts than any other single food. Milk is an outstanding source of calcium and phosphorus for bones and teeth, and contains riboflavin, vitamins B6, A and B1 in significant amounts. It also contains B12, the antipernicious anaemia vitamin. Milk fat or butterfat is the second largest component of milk and is of major commercial value. Fat content is closely followed by milk proteins at about 3.4%. Milk proteins in turn are subdivided into casein, comprising approximately 76–80% of the total milk proteins, and the whey proteins, comprising roughly 20–24%. The whey proteins are of higher nutritional value than casein. Milk proteins are outstanding sources of essential amino acids. The nutritive value of milk products is based on the high nutritive value of milk as modified by processing. Over-processing and, in particular, severe heat treatment reduce the nutritional value of milk. Butter-making concentrates the fat-soluble nutrients, while cheese-making concentrates the milk fat and the major protein fractions. In some instances milk is fortified with certain nutrients, e.g. vitamin D. It is also possible to replace butterfat with a cheaper fat, as is often done in the manufacture of calf milk replacers and in powdered milk for certain markets. Milk components are also used in other foods: sodium caseinate is used as a protein source in sausages and "filled" meats, whey proteins are used in confectionery and milk proteins are used in sauces for instant foods. http://www.ilri.org/InfoServ/Webpub/Fulldocs/ILCA_Manual4/Milkasafood.htm
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@dbhattji (2507)
• India
17 Jul 07
Wow, that is very informative, you do research your answers. Thanks.
• United States
8 Jul 07
My child would certainly agree with your theory! She loves milk, and would drink it exclusively if I allowed her to do so. However, since she is a growing child, I find that milk actually quenches her appetite so that she wants no other food. So, I cannot allow her to have milk more than twice a day or else she would not eat anything. So perhaps it is true that milk provides all the nutrition one could need. Or, at least it makes a person feel full so they don't want anything else. Who is to say, however, what the long term effects of a pure milk diet would be.
@dbhattji (2507)
• India
9 Jul 07
A child could probably drink a lot of milk but as we grow up we lack the enzyme needed to digest milk properly so when she grows up she will probably have to develop other tastes as well.
@wdiong (1818)
• Singapore
7 Jul 07
According to an article published on the Internet by the Newer Knowledge of Milk, there are several benefits of milk: the ability to prevent osteoporosis, hyper tension, and colon cancer. And most importantly, these benefits are derived from an intake of fluid milk, not simply vitamins or other sources. Drinking milk also helps reduce the incidence of tooth decay. There is no evidence to support the theory that drinking chocolate milk aids in tooth decay, and as a result, allowing children to drink chocolate milk increases their consumption of milk. One of the major contributing factors to many people shucking the benefits of milk for a substitute source is the belief that drinking milk will cause them to gain weight. There is no evidence that drinking the required servings of dairy products such as milk contribute to a person being overweight. I may just consider living on milk alone :)
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@dbhattji (2507)
• India
8 Jul 07
That is very interesting, thank you for the details. I like to drink milk for it's taste also.