Work /Life Balance - Now Men Are Getting Criticised Too?

@urbangirl (1461)
Australia
July 10, 2007 4:01am CST
There was a time when only women who had high flying careers got criticised for their work/family life balance so I was surprised the other day to hear that criticism being aimed at the Premier of our State (who is being male). His commitment to running the state was called into question because he likes to be home by 6pm to spend with his family - he and his wife have three young kids. So, I wonder if you have heard or experienced anything similar for any high profile males.
8 people like this
13 responses
@flpoolbum (2393)
• United States
11 Jul 07
In the U.S. we had a president in the 80's, Ronald Reagan. I seem to remember him being critized because he ended his day at 5pm. I didn't think that that was such a big deal. I mean he was the President of the United States, it's not like they wouldn't be able to find him if something came up.
3 people like this
@youdontsay (3503)
• United States
13 Jul 07
I think they are just looking for something to tear him down and if that is the worst they can find, he's a good leader! Sounds like he is a good role model. He does his work AND balances his life with his family. I wonder why they don't complain about leaders who neglect their family by working so much? Oh, that's right. They WILL complain about that when they don't like the way they do their job. When you are a high-profile personality, there are going to always be people looking for some way to cut you down. It goes with the position.
@derek_a (10903)
10 Jul 07
There does seem to be a expectancy for employees to put their work before home life these days. Also there is a lot of judgement & criticisms on our politicians in the UK as to where and how they spend their holidays and where and how their kids get educated. I wouldn't be a politician for any money...
@urbangirl (1461)
• Australia
10 Jul 07
Oh yes - they definitely have to have a thick skin...I certainly could not put up with that kind of stress for (relatively) little money.
1 person likes this
@derek_a (10903)
10 Jul 07
Too true - not to mention being a target for terrorists.
1 person likes this
@chileman (969)
• Australia
11 Jul 07
Yes it is definately becoming more common and you hear alot more about quality of life and time with your family and friends over time in the office. Bit harsh on those criticizing your Premier, I'd be interested to see how many of those are married with children!
@urbangirl (1461)
• Australia
11 Jul 07
The criticism came from an ex-politician...the difference between him and this politician was that his kids were older when he was a politician...then again Blair actually had a baby with his wife while in office - and his wife also had a high profile career...I wonder how they balanced all that.
• Philippines
19 Jul 07
Good for him to realize that that there is more to life than work and work and work. To whoever criticized him for trying to be at home by 6 pm,he seriously need a life. Having a balanced life is important whether your a politician or not.
@Lydia1901 (16354)
• United States
18 Jul 07
Well, that is so good for him and I hope that is great in my opinion. I do not know of anyone that is going through that right now.
• United States
10 Jul 07
It is so terrible that a man cannot be allowed to enjoy his family life. Every family deserves a strong male figure. Mothers and fathers are the backbone of every society. Without a strong central family unit, the family often falls apart. And, that is not good for the country. I am happy to see that your Premier of State is happy to set a good example for others. In the US, many men are realizing that they also need more quality family time. It's becoming more standard for Dads to work at home so they can be around the children more.
@wilynn (754)
• Singapore
10 Jul 07
Leaving the office on time is good practice. Especially for high flyers, it sets a good example for others to follow. Some people think that by staying late in office or working overtime is good. In fact, its pure lousy. Why? You do not have a balance life and so it will undoubtedly affect your work life. I think the premier of your state is doing a good job by setting good example.
@lecanis (16739)
• Murfreesboro, Tennessee
10 Jul 07
I haven't heard much of this issue in terms of men yet, but I do wish that men and women would be held to the same standards on this type of thing. Obviously it's ridiculous that people think he isn't committed to his job because he is committed to his family. In fact, I think doing any job properly requires having a stable off-work life as well! It makes things a little different in this case because it's politics: if he did work all the time, people would be saying he was neglecting his family and smearing him becuase of that I'm sure. Stupid mud-slinging is what it sounds like to me. I know in my own life I don't have any kind of high-profile job, but as soon as I had a child people started asking me if I was going to quit my job to stay home with my son and such. No one asked my husband if he would do such a thing, of course.
@rhinoboy (2129)
10 Jul 07
I think that unless you're unique or a specialist in your particular field, a person is required to be dedicated to their career in order to succeed. I do believe that for some important and high-profile jobs that the person must put their jobs on almost equal priority to their family, of course being given adequate family time. I do think it's sometimes a choice you have to make. To be honest, I think the 'old fashioned way' worked best, when women would stay home to raise kids and men would earn a living for the household. I get the impression that this is still a lot more common in the USA and other various countries than it is in the UK these days. It seems quite ridiculous really as most couples need to both work in order to cover genreral bills and mortgage repayments and are forced (not literally of course) to have our children looked after in daycare nurseries. I would have loved for either my wife or myself (yes, I loved the idea of being a stay-at-home dad) to take a few years off work until our daughter starts school, but unfortunately, we would have only just been able to cope financially. As interest rates are rising here, mortgage payments are on the up and we would have risked losing our home.
• United States
10 Jul 07
Very interesting question. Our family is our anchor in the world. What separetes us from the rest of the animal kingdom (generally speaking) is our love, caring and devotion to the family unit. A career is what provides for the shelter, food and clothing. Along the way we accumulate "things" that add to the pleasure of living. Many men are now realizing the family is forever. Jobs/Careers are necessary. Personal satisfaction comes from a job well done and factoring in the dynamics of a cohesive family unit. Good for him!
@Lakota12 (42794)
• United States
10 Jul 07
No I havent heard this but I see nothng wrong with him wanting to spend time with family . Even tho he is to run the state he aslo has a home life . I say good for him!
@sigma77 (5385)
• United States
10 Jul 07
Just who has final say on how we run our lives? If a woman or man wants to be a workaholic and avoid their families, that is their choice. If a person wants two careers, such as working and raising a family, that again is their choice. Who has the right to tell others how much to work or how much to be a parent or how much to do of anything? If any woman or man can strike a balance between work and family and make it work out, then who can say otherwise? If there are problems, then it is up to the person to make adjustments, not the work/life balance police.