The Potential Dangers Of Hot Weather

@pyewacket (43962)
United States
July 10, 2007 4:05pm CST
Okay some of us have been posting discussions about how miserably hot it is, including me, and in many cases these discussions are light-hearted. But as you know there are potential dangers with hot weather, and can strike anyone of us, regardless of their health. I came across two great websites that give info about heat exhaustion and heat stroke. There are here: http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_exhaustion/article.htm http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_stroke/article.htm And while you can read the symptoms and what to do in either case, I want to post the signs/symptoms of them here--I think this is valuable information for a lot of us, now that we're all baking in the dog days of summer. Heat Exhaustion: Recognizing Heat Exhaustion Warning signs of heat exhaustion include: * heavy sweating * paleness * muscle cramps * tiredness * weakness * dizziness * headache * nausea or vomiting * fainting The skin may be cool and moist. The victim's pulse rate will be fast and weak, and breathing will be fast and shallow. If heat exhaustion is untreated, it may progress to heat stroke. Seek medical attention immediately if: * symptoms are severe, or * the victim has heart problems or high blood pressure. Otherwise, help the victim to cool off, and seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than 1 hour. What to Do Cooling measures that may be effective include: * cool, non-alcoholic beverages, as directed by your physician * rest * cool shower, bath, or sponge bath * an air-conditioned environment * Lightweight clothing Heat Stroke: What are heat stroke symptoms? Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heart exhaustion before progressing to heart strokes. Symptoms of heat exhaustion may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, headache, muscle cramps and aches, and dizziness. However some individuals can develop symptoms of heat stroke suddenly and rapidly without warning. Different people may have different symptoms and signs of heat stroke. But common symptoms and signs of heart stroke include: * high body temperature * the absence of sweating, with hot red or flushed dry skin * rapid pulse * difficulty breathing * strange behavior * hallucinations * confusion * agitation * disorientation * seizure * coma How do you treat a heat stroke victim? Victims of heat stroke must receive immediate treatment to avoid permanent organ damage. First and foremost, cool the victim. Get the victim to a shady area, remove clothing, apply cool or tepid water to the skin (for example you may spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose), fan the victim to promote sweating and evaporation, place ice packs under armpits and groins. Monitor body temperature with a thermometer and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102 degrees. Always notify emergency services (911) immediately. If their arrival is delayed, they can give you further instructions for treatment of the victim. The most important measures to prevent heat strokes are to avoid becoming dehydrated, and to avoid vigorous physical activities in hot and humid weather. If you have to perform physical activities in hot weather, drink plenty of fluids (such as water and Gatorade), but avoid alcohol, coffee, and tea which may lead to dehydration. Take frequent breaks to hydrate yourself. Wear hats, and light colored, and light and loose clothes. There's a lot more detail that can be read at the two sites I've listed....
5 people like this
15 responses
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
11 Jul 07
I'm very suseptable to heat exhaustion so have to be careful. Summer is not my favorite time of year and it's been horrible here the last few weeks - I am looking forward to fall, winter, and spring. I would however add avoid sodas (pop) it's just as bad as going without liquids and actually some will cause more dehydration.
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
I'm looking forward to fall, and winter too..just think in Australia, it's there winter! Maybe we should go there!
@polachicago (19143)
• United States
11 Jul 07
Eat lightly. Hot foods and high-calorie or high-protein meals raise your body's metabolism and its temperature. Think fresh fruits and vegetables, cold salads, and the like. Pace yourself. This is not the time to take up running. It may, in fact, be time to stop running for a while, unless you can do so at night when it cools off. Loose clothing made of light-coloured, natural fabrics such as cotton and linen is best. Do not leave children or pets in parked cars, even for brief periods of time. The temperature inside the car can rise to 49ºC (120ºF) or more within minutes. Stay inside if possible in cool place. Take cold showers...
2 people like this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
11 Jul 07
I've been living on so many salads that I think I'll turn into a rabbit soon--LOL That's a good point you make..especially about leaving pets in a car...so many people wouldn't dream of leaving kids in a car, but forget that animals are affected too
1 person likes this
@susieq223 (3742)
• United States
10 Jul 07
You have been typing your little fingers off lately! Thanks for sharing all that info. It was 100 on our porch today (in the shade). I stayed inside as much as possible. I don't do heat very well.
2 people like this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
11 Jul 07
I don't do heat very well either...I bet you wish you were at the ocean again...right?
1 person likes this
@arcidy (5017)
• United States
10 Jul 07
those are some dangerous things to heat danger I hate being out in the heat espically when I have to work when its very hot out side I always have a feer that im just going to faint because of heat exaustion thats why I drink lots of cool water which is the best thing to do when your outside and go inside a lot and take lots of brakes.
2 people like this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
11 Jul 07
They do say to drink a lot of water..it does help
1 person likes this
@yojspew (171)
• Philippines
11 Jul 07
Luckily, summer season has ended here in the Philippines but I remember during summer season...the temperature is extremely hot. That's why I don't go out of our house often to avoid heat.
• India
11 Jul 07
oh..i luv d heat..jus makes you feel so much better while taking a bath or sleeping after a sweat bath..
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
The summer season has ended? Wow..you're lucky...we still have a good two months or so of hot weather
• United States
11 Jul 07
You are so right and thank you for posting this great information. I have had heat stroke once but lived too far in the country for anything but at-home treatment. I am most grateful that the people home with me knew the signs and how to care for me. Forgive me for what I am about to say next because I know that the FBI, the CIA, and all other offices of the government will really invade my computer; but I don't understand why (at least in our country) The Surgeon General's Office does not do a mass mailing for each extreme season that would contain the information you just posted. People could post it in their homes and everyone could/should be aware. We are not all blessed with internet access or even television for that matter. Again, thank you for posting this information. (A plus for the post!) ~Donna
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
That would be such a wonderful idea...well you know how backward this govt can get sometimes!
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
OH PS--they send flyers about what to recycle and what not too, not that, that isn't important info too...but you think people's health would take a better priority
• United States
10 Jul 07
I have had heat exhaustion before and it is definately not pleasant al all. I don't work in the sun unless I have to and when I do I do it in short spurts and try to do it early or late in the day when the heat is apt to be less intense. I usually drink coffee, but when working in heat I drink water and lots of it. If I start to get shaky or nauseous then I stop and rest for a while.
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
10 Jul 07
I'll actually go out of my way an will walk on the shader side of a street...to walk in that sun even for a few minutes is torture and I'll start feeling a bit dizzy..not pleasant
1 person likes this
@rsmith512 (1561)
• United States
11 Jul 07
Heat exhaustion is not pleasant at all. When I feel like that...I make sure that I do not push myself any more and take a break and get some water. :D Again, thanks for the information.
@cher913 (25895)
• Canada
11 Jul 07
thank you for the heads up. as we dont have central air, i have been suffering from headaches lately and i have been very tired, which i know is heat related...we have been going to air conditioned places at night after supper such as the library and the mall and i have a shower before i go to bed to cool down also.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
12 Jul 07
I don't have a/c either...I go out mainly to go someplace during the day that is air-conditioned just to cool down for a few hours
• United States
11 Jul 07
This is some very good and useful information. In New York people have been complaining about how hot it is and all of the symptoms they've been having but they weren't sure what is was from now I can reply to them that it is actually the heat causing all this suffering. I like the part about the clothing I already was wearing loose clothing and was taking breaks whiles doing little jobs around the house. This is the first post I am writing since joining. I'm happy I chose you.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
Why thank you Brownbeauty....I live in NY too...and it's been horrible weather, hasn't it?
• United States
11 Jul 07
Living in the desert, I am aware of all this. Your posting is 100% correct. I am happy that you were thoughtful enough to share it with us. The most dangerous people at risk are the very young and very old, too. God bless you sugar.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
I imagine living in the desert this is common knowledge...but heat exhaustion/stroke can affect anyone, anywhere
@TerryZ (22146)
• United States
11 Jul 07
I found out how dangerous the heat can be and I was only out in it a couple of hours. But mine wasnt a severe attack. In fact it didnt hit me till the next day. Thanks for all great information on it. So now I know to stay out of the heat.LOL Or is it stay out of the kitchen.hehehehehhe I couldnt resist it.LOL
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
Actually you were the "inspiration" of this discussion TerryZ--you had me real worried about how you were describing how you felt
@kuchiyose (163)
• Singapore
11 Jul 07
Thanks for sharing with us about heat stroke. Keeping one adequately hydrated in hot weather is very important. Getting heat stroke is no fun. Other than the suffering the victim has to go through, I'm sure it costs a bomb for all the medical care and response needed to save the victim's life. Furthermore, the aftereffects are certainly not desirable. Therefore, this is a timely reminder about the symptoms of heat stroke and how one should respond in such an event. Thanks again for sharing with us this information and lets hope this goes to make a difference in somebody's life.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
Thank you--I hope this info will help someone as well
@howard96h (11665)
• New York, New York
11 Jul 07
Great post! I hope people drink lots of fluids and limit their time out in the sun and heat. I was watching the news and saw these runners in the park sweating so bad and they refuse to give their bodies a break until it gets a little cooler. I just don't understand some people, like it's going to kill them if they miss their daily run.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
Hehe--my opinion that runners are a bit daft...I wouldn't even want to run in the winter if I didn't have to--rather walk through life than run--LOL I always carry a bottle of water with me when I go out--even to our favorite store
@rsmith512 (1561)
• United States
11 Jul 07
Lately it has been raining and is still raining...but, Thank you so much for that information. My mom always keep us hydrated when we are outside in the summer months. It is a good thing to know the symptoms and how to treat it just in case it does happen. So, thank you again for the information. I know that it might help someone! :D
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
You don't have to be a kid to need lots of liquids ...I'm drinking so much water lately I'm waiting to float!
@worldwise1 (14890)
• United States
11 Jul 07
A very timely and helpful topic, pyewacket. I especially worry about the elderly and infirm in such extremes of temperature as we have witnessed recently. Many of them live alone and do not have AC. Believe it or not many do not even have electric fans. That is why our city started giving them out to people in need a few years back. I thank God every day that I can live in air conditioned comfort. I don't know if I could make it otherwise. Thank you for alerting the members here on MyLot to the dangers.
@pyewacket (43962)
• United States
16 Jul 07
That's great that where you live they did that for the elderly...Uh..gulp..I don't have a/c --drat