just a random thing I don't get.

@Galena (9123)
July 23, 2007 8:04am CST
been watching TV, and was getting really annoyed that the presenter said "yooman" instead of Human. with an H. mentioning this, someone said, yeah, that's an American thing. like Erbs and Erbal instead of Herbs and Herbal. so. any Americans care to tell me what's wrong with the letter H? hehe.
3 people like this
6 responses
• United States
24 Jul 07
hmm..i've never pronounced human like that. i do say "erbs" though,only because people where i live feel they have to correct you if you don't.i used to pronounce the h. i guess we make up for dropping letters by adding them in words where they aren't necessary. like "pneumonia" LOL
@Galena (9123)
24 Jul 07
if anyone corrected me for saying herbs I wouldn't change it. I can't help it, Erbs sounds really silly. I love my herb garden.
1 person likes this
24 Jul 07
Don't you mean your Erb garden? I think it sounds ridiculous, too. Ah well. x
1 person likes this
@derek_a (10902)
24 Jul 07
Here in Wales (UK), there is often a dropping of "H" from various words. But we do so say Herbs and not erbs. The h often gets dropped from words like hand (and), house (ouse)- When I lived in the north of England, often two words would get put together, which I thought was quaint... like th'ouse (the house) th'oven (the oven), and sometime missing the "the" altogether - like "I can see dog coming now..." in place of "I can see the dog coming now". I once saw a documentary where they were claiming the English language was changing and evolving out of recognition.. Which isn't surprising because if we listen to old English now, we would hardly understand it.. :-)
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@Galena (9123)
24 Jul 07
hehe. good old Yorkshire. my great Grandad, I could never understand a word the man said, his accent was so broad.
2 people like this
@derek_a (10902)
25 Jul 07
Oh yes, my ex came from Yorkshire and her step-father talked a different language - very broad from Bradford.. I managed to work it all out eventually. I love all sorts of accents - :-)
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
24 Jul 07
I agree with zukepr...I've always pronounced human with a definite "h" sounds and like her though do pronouce herb like erb....oh the flip side...don't most people from Britain pronounce hello, like "allo"??? Just curious...LOL
1 person likes this
@Galena (9123)
24 Jul 07
only the commoners daaaaaaaahhhling ;P
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
24 Jul 07
*I* say "human." I don't know anyone that doesn't say "human." I also say "palm" with the "l" not "paaam" like some people. Now, we do drop the "h"s off herb - but I think its partly to tell the difference between the plants & the guys. But that comes from softening those "h"s right out of existance rather than ignoring them. "'e'd go 'ome if 'e could" isn't good English, but you hear it. Its like putting an "an" artical in front of some "h" words rather than an "a" artical. As in "Its an honor to meet you." You don't stress the "h". You do, however, say "She's got a horse" rather than "an horse" if you see what I mean.
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (50282)
• United States
23 Jul 07
I've never heard an American say uman, instead of human. Of course the herb thing is pretty common. I guess it is just like any other country, they share the same words, but not the same pronunciation. I do hope though, that the uman thing does not catch on. : )
1 person likes this
@arcadian (931)
• United States
27 Jul 07
tsk tsk tsk slammin the yanks again, you Brits hav nothing better to do. :b That's okay, we slam us too. We have so many dialects in the States that sometimes we can't understand each other. I lived awhile in North Carolina and I'm here to tell you -no exaggeration, some of the dialects there are so hard they are treated like a foriegn language. Two dialects. And what it is is that the people have inhabited a region hard to get to and became insulted. Talkers and singers from Asheville have such a strong scottish influence in their speech that recordings have been made to preserve it at the Library of Congress. Its not English. they settled there in the late 1600's and only since computers have they begun to mingle and speak with an american pronunciation and vocabulary. There's another group on the other side of the state where they teach the language they are speaking as it is so strange to us, still call it English..There's no one way we talk, but we are agreed on one thing. Damned if we're gonna call our erbs herbs. Ha!
@arcadian (931)
• United States
27 Jul 07
I didn't mean they got insulted I meant to say insulated. Should have proofed my comments- so amny typoes. Always in a hurry when I'm kidding around