Interracial family. Is it easy for you to be accepted?

@LittleMel (14055)
Canada
August 8, 2007 7:12pm CST
I have read topics about interracial marriage on mylot and I found that most people do not see a problem in that. Now for those who are married to someone of different race, has the family accepted you? does it take you some time to blend or does the family open their arms for you with no difficulties? I'm not racist nor being nosy, I'm just curious about a lot of things and today my curiosity lies on interracial family relationship.
1 person likes this
5 responses
@polachicago (19075)
• United States
9 Aug 07
I don't think it should be any problem. It all depends on family. Many years ago I used to date guy for different race and my family didn't have any problem with it... However some of his habits I couldn't understand or accept, but it could happen with same race guy anyway...
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
there must be some things in other cultures we can't understand. I am Asian married to a Caucasian and it took us some time to understand each other, it's even worse because English is not my mother language
@polachicago (19075)
• United States
9 Aug 07
I am Caucasian, but I think that Asian people are easy to understand, nice, hard working, loyal and trusty. It is much easier for me to get along with Asian people than any other race...
1 person likes this
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
Do you often fall for Asian men too? I always fall for Caucasian men for some reason
@laridbz (1287)
• China
9 Aug 07
Well, I've never been married to anyone, but I had a few interracial relationships before. No, I never had any problems. Neither with my own family, nor with the guy's family. I didn't even notice people looking strangely at us on the streets. It's weird, because even though I live in a very mixed country, people can be very intolerant and racist around here.
1 person likes this
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
so you never have problems from both sides, how lucky of you
• Singapore
9 Aug 07
Hi, well i'm married to a different race, maybe i'm just lucky that so far i have no problem with it. I'm the woman, so traditionally i have to move to my husband's place. My in-laws accepted me and right there told me that they thought of me as their real daughter and not a daughter in-law. So there's probably different meaning with that. I strongly believe that when you love the person, you can accept and will try to love whoever this person, whatever his race.... sometimes or should i say often times the problem starts w/ the in-laws. So I guess it's better for your own sake, you have to be aware of that and don't get too emotional when you're around with your in-laws. Just be prepared and always think of the person that you married and not bother of what other people say. Well, that's my point of view.
1 person likes this
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
they do say love is blind, yet there is also a saying you can choose your friends but not your family. in some cases, in laws can be big problems, let alone cultural and race difference
@mavisbike (1528)
• United States
9 Aug 07
I personally dont have a problem with colored people but my family and locals is a diffrent story they are mostly rednecks and use certain racial words alot also there are no colord people within 30 miles of here
1 person likes this
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
oh my, thanks for letting me know. I will never go there when I visit mylot friends in the US.
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
9 Aug 07
I'm of three different racial backgrounds..."anglo," hispanic and Native American--I'm beginning to realize just how hard it must have been for my grandparents on my maternal side. My grandmother was one-hundred percent Irish background, therefore "anglo"---she married a man who was part Spanish and Mexican born in Puebla, Mexico. He came from a very good background, well-educated and the family for the most part all worked for the government. When he married my grandmother though, despite his good background, he wasn't allowed to speak in his native Spanish language, he HAD to learn English, after all the belief you're in America now..you must speak English and forget Spanish...how narrow minded when you think of it...and my grandmother's brother I've been told made it all to clear that he didn't approve of this marriage...but then he was a real shallow minded bigot--sad no?
1 person likes this
@LittleMel (14055)
• Canada
9 Aug 07
I can understand why he has to learn English too, but forgetting his own native language I think it's strange. so your grandmother's brother didn't approve due to his race, but none from the man's family disapproved, at least your grandmother was accepted by her in laws