Internet Servers

@carolbee (16241)
United States
November 2, 2007 2:13pm CST
I have more people make fun of me because I have AOL and still use dial up. I don't need anything fast as many of the things I do on the computer don't require "fast." MyLot loads quick enough and so does the viewbar I keep on the top of my computer screen (check my profile page.) My question is: how many use AOL as their server?
1 person likes this
1 response
@santuccie (3375)
• United States
5 Nov 07
According to ISP Planet, AOL is still #3, with approximately 10.9 million subscribers: http://www.isp-planet.com/research/rankings/usa.html I've never had dial-up myself. My very first ISP was SBC, back when I lived in Fremont, CA. But I do take advantage of AOL's free McAfee security suite, and also their free e-mail, which offers whitelist filtering. My current ISP is Comcast; actually, Comcast provides my TV, phone, AND Internet. But I'll probably be switching to AT&T before long. DSL is beginning to overtake cable in speed, especially considering that DSL is not pipeline, so your connection is not affected by other users. Comcast is also starting to become rather tyrannous, blocking access to networks such as P2P to save bandwidth. They also have massive outages every few months, which is hardly professional for a company that people depend on for something as vital as phone service. As it were, I do have the need for speed, and I also don't intend to pay $125 per month to a company who thinks they can tell me what I can and cannot use online, especially when someone else offers all the same features for the same price, with greater stability and fewer limitations. Comcast is headed straight for a brick wall at over 60, and it's not going to be pretty. :S
@carolbee (16241)
• United States
5 Nov 07
Thank you for the very informative information. I know many people that have DSL and always have a problem with something. When cable goes out, there is no working land line phone or computer connection. It's a real annoying situation. The cable company in our area is ok and they charge a bundle each month. I have dial up so we will always have a phone and I don't need the speed while on the computer. In other words, we are content. Thanks for your response.
1 person likes this
@santuccie (3375)
• United States
5 Nov 07
Thank you also for your reply. And suffice it to say you are not the only person who finds dial-up to be quite satisfactory. I recall an instance about three years ago when I completely revamped a computer for a friend who was dissatisfied with its performance. To this day, he only uses the machine for e-mail, accounting, and work-related documents (most of which were written or restored by me). His machine, from what I recall, is a Pentium II 700 MHz, with 384 MB of RAM. I told him that Windows 2000 was likely the most stable operating system ever written by Microsoft, and took up far less resources than XP. At his request, I blasted the hard drive and replaced his operating system and applications. Thanks to SP4, his copy of Office 2003 was supported by Windows 2000, and did not go to waste. While in the process of installing drivers and twenty-something megabytes of updates (which took me almost 3 hours to download; thank goodness it wasn't XP I was updating), I did happen to notice that his dial-up connection was considerably faster than before. So did he, and he sees positively no need whatsoever to upgrade. He pays $10 per month for unlimited dial-up access, and couldn't be happier. He calls it his "calculator," in reference to its function strictly as a tool in his office. Just for discussion, using dial-up as opposed to broadband serves to greatly reduce your exposure to online threats. Not only is your connection of little interest to a bot herder, but your own use of the Internet is probably narrow in scope. This is not a bad thing in itself, and it's also not a bad thing that limited use of the Internet means you probably don't do much "wandering." That would make you a low-risk user, and much safer than a majority. :)
@santuccie (3375)
• United States
5 Nov 07
Please excuse me. I believe I said my friend's computer's processor was at 700 MHz. That would make it a Pentium III. ;)