Would you pull your child out of an science class that taught evolution?

United States
November 15, 2007 2:59am CST
First I must confess. I am not a parent and I think evolution is a good part of science class And I believe in G-d.That being said, if I were a parent, I wouldn't pull Johnny or Jane out of class.How about you?
10 people like this
30 responses
@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
15 Nov 07
Well, I'm not a parent either, though if I had a child, I'd make sure they get a well-rounded education. That includes, of course, evolution, and intelligent design if they wish to look into it as well. I'm a very objective person, however, so evolution will be a must. I can't understand why a parent would be so careless with their child's education as to pull them out of class just because "they don't believe in evolution". You know, if you don't believe it, that's fine - but don't make your child suffer intellectually because you don't believe in, nor care to understand, the theory of evolution. I've met enough students who were homeschooled by parents who didn't believe in evolution, and their ignorance of the concept is astounding. If they claim evolution is false it's because "it's too complex" - a horrid excuse, and one that comes from lack of understanding about evolution. Of course, that could easily be avoided by allowing them to at least learn the basics of it. So ends my little rant about parental negligence with their children's education. I intend to provide my future children with access to any shred of information available that peaks their interest. I can't imagine doing anything less.
3 people like this
@djbtol (5498)
• United States
15 Nov 07
In your list of alternatives for the well-rounded education, you failed to include Creation. If a parent says they believe one thing, but then send their child off to form their own opinion, then the parent considers their own belief only an opinion. Parents who believe in truth, earnestly desire for their children to believe the truth as well. Truth is truth - same truth for parent and child. Their is no intellectual damage when one does not consider the theory of evolution to be truth. Quite the opposite, the necessary shutting down of the mind required to believe evolution may really be what is damaging. Is it a problem for home-schooled Christian children to not know all the ins and outs of evolution? Not really. Once the basics are known, and the preposterous lie is evident, then it is time to move on and study the truth of Creation. How many of the government school evolution camp know the Bible well enough to see how creation is taught all through scripture? I hope to provide my children with truth, so they can walk in the light of truth. djbtol
2 people like this
• United States
16 Nov 07
Latrivia, for the ultra religious don't want their kids to know evolution at all, not even the basics.It is like they think that evolution dismisses their G-d and there isn't anything we can do about that.
• United States
16 Nov 07
Djbtol,how does teaching evolution close the mind?And I am sorry but no U.S. public school will be able to teach Creation because it comes from the Bible, a religious book.Creation is a Christian truth but there are many non Christians that won't except it.
• United States
28 Jan 08
I would pull my child out of any class that taught a one-sided view of anything, whether history, evolution or english. I expect my children to be taught that there are always more options and always alternative theories.
2 people like this
@worldwise1 (14887)
• United States
13 Jan 08
I think it is the responsibility of parents to teach their children about moral values and religion at home, sarah, and I would not have a problem with sending them to a school that taught evolution. Children are usually a quick study, and learn to form their own opinions soon enough, lol.
2 people like this
• United States
15 Nov 07
Even though i am not a parent, i would not pull my child out of a class that taught evolution because i think that children need to be exposed to all kinds of astpects of life, and that seeing both sides of an issue is a good thing!!
@Raymo23 (465)
• Uganda
15 Nov 07
I would not pull him out. Instead, I would teach him about God, his love for us and the fact that he created the world. That we are not here by accident, and that all this beauty is not here by accident. Then he would be able, like I have, to discern that evolution is for losers, and a bag of lies.
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
17 Nov 07
"losers" huh? What a Christian thing to say.
2 people like this
@Raymo23 (465)
• Uganda
17 Nov 07
Yes, its christian to know that some people are not going anywhere. They are losers.
• United States
18 Nov 07
How is it Christian to demean people that disagree with you? Where did Christ say that?
• United States
24 Jan 08
In my home I feel I should only teach my child things I know to be factual, so therefor religion is not a huge part of our lives and neither is evolution.I don't think I will pull my son out of a class because it is being taught, nor will he be punished or corrected for taking an interest in it, same goes for religion.I believe that he should make his own choices about both.Of course, he's only five...
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Jan 08
That's the way to go. If your son has an interest in either religion or evolution, then you will help him study it.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Jan 08
D'oh. I forgot to add that you won't have to worry about either for a while.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jan 08
well I would support him either way, and if I can offer an unbiased opinion to help him further along, then I will certainly try.I believe that no one man should influence another on what he or she should believe.What is right for one, isn't always right for another.My job as a parent is to love,nurish and protect, and I can't see where learning about any of those things would be harmful.If nothing else it will help him to be open-minded and able to make sound decisions based on information he has gathered himself,regardless of what I or his father believe.It will help him to become the person he wants to be.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
25 Jan 08
I won't. I truly believe in God. Now if i learned that my kid has taken up lessons about this evolution, i would explain to him/her the difference about facts and theories. I was once a student and have taken up that lessons back to my tertiary level. I had this question in my mind before... if theory of evolution is no longer a theory, what would happen to us (christians)? for example, let's say believe it or not, evolution is true. then maybe God has a good reason for that. But there is one thing for sure that God created all.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jan 08
I don't understand.What would happen to Christians if evolution is true?What would change?
@Wario_1 (969)
• Sweden
25 Jan 08
God would not be God since he cannot create, thus meaning he is not a entity worth calling God. If God can create life, why would he need evolution, when he can create everythng complete. Its like if i want to build a car, and instead of building it directly i wait for the pieces to magically stick themselves together
• United States
28 Jan 08
Wario, why do you think since I think G-d took His time and created other lower forms means He can't create?Just because He started out with lower forms that evolved doesn't mean He can't create. In fact it means the opposite.
@barehugs (8985)
• Canada
14 Jan 08
Evolution is a proven fact. So why would I take my kids out of that class? If there was a class that taught Religion I definately wouldn't want my kids subjected to that. I understand that in some Catholic Schools in Canada there is no discussion. The kids are taught what to believe and that's that!
• United States
14 Jan 08
Just because it is a proven fact doesn't mean a thing to some people. They believe in the Eden story and I just wanted to know if they were so passionate about this issue to take their children out of the science class.
@Wario_1 (969)
• Sweden
25 Jan 08
please, share with us how evolution is a proven fact. I agre that Micro-evolution is proven but not Macro-evolution. Much like the Catholic schools in Canada, schools everywere teach evolution and children are taught to believe in evolution and thats that.
• United States
28 Jan 08
Wario, how are children taught to believe in evolution?
@livewyre (2455)
19 Nov 07
As long as evolution is taught as a theory, I can see no problem. I was taught evolution, it never stopped me from believing in creation, although it was confusing for me as a child. I think that we have to accept that evolution is a theory, creation is a theory - neither one is likely to be proved. The crux of faith (Christian) is what we believe about Christ. I would be more concerned about how the school is likely to try to portray Christ.
1 person likes this
• United States
20 Nov 07
If it is a public school, Christ will not be taught.
@livewyre (2455)
21 Nov 07
I wouldn't expect then to actually teach Christ as such, but would be more concerned as to whether the school had a standpoint on Christ rather than a standpoint on evolution versus creation. What is the school religious curriculum like?
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Nov 07
If it is a public school , it doesn't have a religious study program. It can't here in the States.
@MarieJ23 (1041)
• United States
15 Nov 07
Since my course is in the field of science so I have encountered evolution concept all the time and we even go deeper on this matter. However, it doesn't bother me and it doesn't affect my belief in God. I just take it as part of the curriculum or of my course. I firmly believe that God is my and all the things creator. So, if I will have a child already, I will never pull him out from his science class that talks about evolution. Instead I will make sure to it that he is fundamentally established with his faith in God and that he knows that he is God's creation and not by evolution. It is just a matter of constant follow-up and making it sure that he knows what he needs to know.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 08
"he is God's creation and not by evolution." This makes absolutely no sense, considering that evolution has nothing to do with the origin of life. This is like saying "I want to make sure my child knows he is God's creation and not by calculus." It's nonsense, and shows that your own understanding of evolution is quite weak. I suggest you don't criticize that which you don't understand. Next time you get the urge to declare evolution a lie, realize that the vaccines invented because of our understanding of the fact of evolution are most likely the reason you are still alive, and weren't killed by one of several childhood diseases that used to kill off the majority of children before they reached school age.
@Wario_1 (969)
• Sweden
25 Jan 08
Clarus, you don't understand it better yourself. If youd understand it well you not support it since you would know that its impossible. To believe in evolution takes more faith than believing in God.
• United States
28 Jan 08
Faith isn't something that can be measured like that. Either you have it or not.some in G-d ,others in evolution . And it isn't a contest to see who has more faith.
@Bev1986 (1427)
• United States
15 Nov 07
I am a parent and I do believe in God... but I did not pull my kids from school when they were learning about evolution. It's a theory and I don't have a problem with them learning it. On the other hand, I did take them to the new Creation Museum in Kentucky a few weeks ago. This museum explains how dinosaurs and the Bible co-existed. Very, very unique and powerful museum!
@djbtol (5498)
• United States
15 Nov 07
I hear you Bev1986! Evolution is a man-made theory to try and explain things man cannot understand. It is more religion than science. Much of the science that supposedly supports evolution has been shown to be junk science. My family also went to the Creation Museum this summer. Outstanding, as I fully expected it to be. I would recommend it to anyone, even a full-blooded evolutionist. The museum does a tremendous job of showing how both creationists and evolutionists are making observations about what can be seen or discovered. They come to different conclusions about the observations only because they start with different assumptions. There is nothing in evolutinary theory that makes it above critical review and questioning. Finally, when it comes to Creation, we must remember, "God was there!" djbtol
• United States
16 Nov 07
G-d was there when the evolution of the universe happened too.
• United States
15 Nov 07
I would not. I believe in God and i think evolution is a bunch of hog wash, but I would not deter my child from being open minded about both issues.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 08
If you think evolution "is a bunch of hog wash," then congratulations, you have been successfully deceived by the creationists. Evolution is a fact, it does not exclude any god or gods (no science does--science doesn't touch supernatural concepts), and the results speak for themselves? You know how no one gets polio anymore? Guess why--it wasn't because of creationism, that's for sure. Rejecting evolution is a sign of a lack of science education. It's on par with rejecting gravity. The "controversy" is artificial, created by dishonest creationists--there is not a scientific community on EARTH that is disputing evolution. http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/comdesc/
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 08
Where is it written that Everyone Has to believe in evolution?
1 person likes this
@Wario_1 (969)
• Sweden
25 Jan 08
I agre Clarusvisum, in microevolution or evolution that doenst lead anywhere but loops infinitely. There is nothing to support that Macro evolution ever occured, since there exists to much that contradicts the entire concept. Nothing just happens, in terms of evolution. If you knew how advanced life if in comparison to machines, youd understand that no life form can survive such changes.
• United States
26 Feb 08
This is a good question. I think that the parents should determine what school they want to bring their children up in. I was brought up in a public school and we had all kinds of theories thrown at us. If I was brought up in an Amish school they go up to the 8 th. grade..but this is their custom/right/privledge? Well, if you go to public school prepare to hear all the different theories as this is paid for by the government. If you don't want your children exposed to evolution then home schooling or a private school is the way to go. I know Henry Ford did not like Latin taught in his private schools..this was his views and he had the money to see that Latin was not taught for his grandchildren. This is what I read in a Ford Biography.....beieve it or not
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Feb 08
I agree.Ther best way to control what Johnny or Jane learn is to either teach them yourself or pick a private school that teaches what you believe. I do believe the Ford-Latin story. I wonder if it was because of Latin being the language Catholics use in prayer?
@anawar (2406)
• United States
25 Feb 08
Back to your original question, and it's an excellent one; no I wouldn't pull my child out of shcool in this instance. I was taught evolution and I was raised a staunch Catholic. My parents, who freak over just about everything, remained calm when evolution was discussed. Their calm demeanor, so opposite of the parents I knew, left me room to breathe and think. Someday, my grandkids will be in school. It's laughable to think my strong headed daughter would pull her child from school because evolution was taught. She's an anthropology major and her upset would come from the opposite end of this discussion. In the end, we all find our own way, except many of us have broken toes from stumbling around in the darkness of our confused brain. Thanks for starting this discussion. It's been very interesting reading all the comments.
• United States
25 Feb 08
Thank you.so your daughter would pull her child out of a Creation class.That's great.To each its own.
@coffeebreak (17820)
• United States
25 Feb 08
No, but I would make sure that I tell them the real story of creation. Otherwise, how can the tell their beliefs and the whys of what they belive or even know the whys themselves? I did however, pull my kids out of the "discet a frog" science class day. I am sorry but with all the dieases and things going on and with frogs and rodants and carriers all that these days... just to cut them open to actually see and touch insides, the risk is just not worth it. I remember doing it in the 7th grade way back when and it was just the most grossest thing and I was so all but tramatized I passed out!
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Feb 08
I told my mom I was going to skip dissect frog day.My mom said it was okay. I went to the library.I wasn't going to do it. I would just average in a F and go from there. The cute part was the science teacher understood and said all I had to do is ask to be excused that day. I did pass the class.
@IddiKlu (176)
• United States
23 Feb 08
I have always encouraged my daughter to see the world objectively, and not to follow the hucksters selling their snake oil to the gullible masses. And evolution, using a very scientific method, is a must in a well rounded education. Anyone with an open mind and doing any amount of reading, cannot help but acknowledge, that it didn't just work in the past, but is an ongoing process, that can be observed in present species. Only someone with eyes and mind(?) closed can deny it. Intelligent design (talk of an oxymoron!) is a fable that has seen the daylight under different names to hide its origin, from another fairy tale book.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Feb 08
The phrase Intelligent Design isn't an oxymoron but how it is used these days it seem that way. I don't think that a person Must believe in evolution to be open minded.People have the choice to believe in evolution or not.I was just wondering if parents who are strongly against evolution would take Johnny or Jane out of class . And most are saying no.They would tell their kids it is just a theory but the kids would be taught it. I was taught evolution but since I hated science, it really didn't matter which theory I was taught. I would study for the test, hopefully pass it and forget it.I usually put the Eden Story and evolution together anyway.
@leavert65 (1018)
• Puerto Rico
11 Feb 08
I wouldn't pull my son out but I would want to know exactly what is being taught. I would also want my son to be able to challenge what is being taught without being downgraded or dismissed. The problem with the teaching of evolution is that teachers will often give their personal view. For example, one of my son's teacher gave her theistic view. However, Darwinian evolution only calls for naturalistic causes as any scientific journal will confirm. I don't think that intelligent design or creation should be taught in public schools as biased uninformed teacher will only do it a disservice.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Feb 08
Sadly if a student in a public school questions the teacher, they take the child out of class.
@pyewacket (44032)
• United States
13 Jan 08
I came from a Christian background myself, but since ever I can remember I've had a deep love for the sciences...in fact I was a classic science geek...I think the main problem here is that too many people take the bible as gospel truth (no pun intended)--much of it is allegorical, a "story" to explain things from a religious veiwpoint--however one has to also understand that the Judiaic/Christian version of Creationism is just one view ...many other religions have their own story of how the universe was created--would it be fair to just teach in schools just one story of creationism in public schools..I don't think so. While evolution is still very much a theory, there is science fact...such as the methods themselves of how to date things, such as with Carbon-14 and Potassium-Argon dating methods that prove the existence of the universe, to be billions years old, and of fossils to be millions years old...creationism ideas want people to believe that the universe and everything in it is only a few thousand years old...how can there be such a descrepancy then?? To pull kids out of classes that teaches evolution just shows how narrow and close-minded some people can be
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 08
I started this post because there was so much passionate feuding among the evolutionists and the creationists. I am neither. I always put both them together. G-d created everything to evolve. and that is that.I never really cared for science so I don't care if evolution is truth or a lie . I just was curious How passionate the creationist were. If I were as passionate about this issue, I would home school my child.But since I am not a creationist and I will never have kids, this won't come up. Anyway I feel that people have the right to be as smart or as dumb as they want to be.There could be proof about evolution and many won't believe it.
@Harley009 (1420)
• India
22 Dec 07
Me neither believe in theory of evolution of life. But you don't have to pull your child from the evolution class, let him know science don't have any other reliable evidence to say about origin of life, so they chose better and latest one among the evolution theory, Let him learn that theory but don't have to believe in it :) I also had studied it from schools, and I remember, I got better marks in Biology ;) I'm still a Muslim and believe life was created by God, and mankind started from Adam & Hawwa(Eve). Cheers!
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Dec 07
I have always put both of them together.G-d created animals and they evolved.
@cripfemme (7714)
• United States
21 Nov 07
I believe in evolution, just to put that out there. I also believe in Gpd. But I have no trouble with my child learning different theories. Because isn't it all theory? I don't even mind if they have a different opinion than me, as long as they were logical in coming to it.
@Wario_1 (969)
• Sweden
25 Jan 08
I agre with you, in the end its just theory.