Why do supervisor or managers doest receive Overtime Pay? Is it the same there?

@Abbyey (760)
Philippines
November 16, 2007 5:18pm CST
Im just wondering why is it that when an employee gets promoted to a supervisory/managerial position - overtime then becomes not valid. They say its because the salary increase compensates it... but in some cases it doesnt... i was just wondering does this applies to all companies... is this nationwide... or is this international? Share your experiences? Share your thoughts too if you thinks its right or wrong? I just want to know how you feel about it. :)
5 responses
• United States
17 Nov 07
In a salary situation, at least at our company. You get compinsated at the end of the year in a bonus. Most companys that I have ever worked for did it that way. Others did it in the sence where they paid for every freakin line item thing including your "compultion purchase" while on a biz trip. Guess it depends on the company.
@Calais (10900)
• Australia
17 Nov 07
It depends if they go onto a Salary or stay on a Wage...A Salary package is a set amount for the year no matter what hours you work plus perks, whereas on a wage you are entitled to be paid overtime...
• United States
17 Nov 07
Here an employer has to pay over time for anything over 40 hours worked in one week. The only way to get out of paying for overtime is if someone is on salary. If you are on salary you will get paid the same each month no matter how many or how few hours you work. Normally though, once you accept a salaried position you end up working countless hours and once you figure out your paycheck you have actually made less than minimum wage per hour. It sucks but some times that's life :)
@butterfly39 (3907)
• Philippines
16 Nov 07
Once you are promoted into a higher position, of course the salary will increase too and basically some companies will automatically not include the overtime because of the salary they get then...
@meholl (510)
• United States
16 Nov 07
Well it depends on how you look at it, and what kind of business it is. Say in the food industry, it might pay off to be a manager and supervisor. But say a manager of a c-store may have made more at an hourly wage than with a salary. My husband could be a supervisor if he wanted, but the money he makes off overtime alone is not worth the pay cut at this time. Anyone given a promotion to this position is aware that they may work more hours, and get a salary instead of an hourly wage. What I often wonder is if given the opportunity to move up to a supervisory position, can you ask to keep an hourly rate?