What are your opinions on the separation of the church and the state?

@Raymo23 (465)
Uganda
November 18, 2007 11:31am CST
Recently, the Governor of Georgia Sonny Perdue state in the USA led prayers to God-the Christian, acknowledging that the people had been wasteful, but they needed the rain to help end the current water crisis. Now, this is not about what Perdue was praying for, but about the fact that he is Governor-a political leader-leading prayers in what is a constitutionally secular nation. A little distance away from where the prayers were held was a small crowd of protesters, protesting about this. Ever since that happened, Perdue has been heavily criticised, the main issue being that he is fusing together church and state. Their opinion, not mine. I for one am for a better relationship between the church and the state-a co-relationship if thats what you like. I think the word is a theocracy. Such a situation, in case it worked smoothly would be an efficient regulator of behavior in a society. It would mean that the laws are drawn upon religious laws, and since people are more loyal to their God than political systems, this would go a long way in ensuring compliance. Look at governments which completely dissociate themselves from religion-like the communist governments; they are the most dictatorial in nature. If a theocracy was allowed to operate at it's very efficiency, without leaning towards a dictatorship or encouraging fundamentalism, then that would be the best form of government to me. What is your opinion about this? What particular problems, or benefits might accrue from this arrangement?
9 people like this
11 responses
• United States
18 Nov 07
hey he prayed for rain and guess what ?It rained so im for whatever works !
1 person likes this
@Raymo23 (465)
• Uganda
18 Nov 07
He asked, and he received. It shows the existence of a loving God.
1 person likes this
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
18 Nov 07
The problem is that most people don't understand what is really ment by seperation of goverment and church. The idea was that the government was not to tell people what religion they were to practice and churches were not to tell the government what to do. There is nothing that says that the government can't pray before seesions of goverment or that a govenor could not pray in public.
1 person likes this
@Raymo23 (465)
• Uganda
18 Nov 07
Succinctly put. There is nothing wrong with Perdue leading a Christian prayer. If you are not Christian, then do not attend. As simple as that. But I also believe it is important to adopt church laws into National laws. They are fair, and have been used in many generations, and they are universal.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27240)
• United States
18 Nov 07
That was exactly what brought our original settlers to the United States, then the New World! A theocracy is that last thing we need in today's crazy, war-torn world. As the old saying goes, "You can't legislate morality". I'm afraid there's no way that kind of government could be installed without leaning towards dictatorship or encouraging fundamentalism. Prayer is a personal thing and it's something nobody can ever take away from anyone. But basing the laws of the land on a particular religious teaching is just plain dangerous, the slippery slope we're always hearing about. Annie
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Nov 07
I believe firmly in the separation of church and state, if religion is used solely for control of the people. However if prayer brings comfort to a grieving nation, area or group I would not object to it as long as no one was forced to take part in it. If it is free will I have no problem
@pastorkayte (2255)
• United States
18 Nov 07
Here is my theory on the subject. Prayer is a personal thing, If a mayor or senator or even president wants to pray, that is his perogative. In the seperation of church and state, individuals should be seen individually. He is an individual who has freedom of religion, thus he can pray anywhere. His freedom of speech says he can do so publically, his being a servant of the state has nothing to do with who he is personally.
@Sillychick (3279)
• United States
18 Nov 07
'People are more loyal to their god than than political systems' If that is true then people who are religious wouldn't need a government, following the laws of the church would be enough to maintain order. Government has no reason to become involved in religion, and vice versa. The United States is a place where people are free to choose which, if any, religion to practice. So what if I don't believe in your god, I have to live by the teachings of your church? No. I think that government should exist in order to make sure that people don't hurt, rob, kill each other, not to tell me what I should believe or stand for. If I want to worship god, I will. But I should not be forced to live by the laws of christianity. That, in my opinion, is what dictatorship is all about. Separation of church and state is possible in a democratic society. In fact, it works better. People of all faiths should have some say in the laws and the way the government is run. That way, people who are not christians won't be forced into living by laws that they do not believe in. There are laws to protect our religious freedom, they are part of what makes America what it is.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
20 Nov 07
I do not think there should be a State religion, which is what the founder fathers meant when they wanted a separation of church and state. They did not want the United States to have an officia church like the Anglican Church in England, the Presbyterian Church in Scotland, and the Roman Catholic Church in Italy. However certain people mistook this to mean that no religion especially Christianity is to be in politics, in other words, they would rather that no politain or governor should be allowed to mention God, Jesus Christ, or the Bible. You are right about communist countries, they have no regard for human life and we should bring God back to the American people. God has given the government or rule of the United States to the President and no one should be prevented from reading a Bible, or having the Ten Commandments in display. And no one should be prevented from saying a prayer in Jesus name. If those protestors get more of what they want, be ready for the bloodshed, for athiests and God haters are not known for their mercy.
@Raymo23 (465)
• Uganda
20 Nov 07
I really do not care much about atheists and all the people who subscribe to those fancy beliefs. To me what matters is the truth, and the truth is christianity.
@foxyfire33 (10009)
• United States
19 Nov 07
I think it's a hard call. I personally support what he did and think it's about time someone was brave enough to be openly religious. See this is how I feel about the whole seperation of church and state...I think it's purpose was so that people would not be forced into a chosen religion or perseuted because of their religion. I don't think it ever meant that religion had no place in government, just that it wouldn't be made mandatory among the citizens. People of "other religions" wouldn't have to hide thei beliefs out of fear. But instead people have taken that in the other direction. Religious Christians are supposed to hide their beliefs so the "other religions" and unreligious people do not get offended. I think everybody needs to just acknowledge that Christianity and "the others" exist and can co-exist as long as no one is making one or another mandatoy or persecuting others with different beliefs. The Georgia govenor's prayer did nothing wrong. He was simply enjoying his Constitutional right to freely practice his religion.
• United States
19 Nov 07
It all depends on where the governor led this prayer. If it was at the court house , I would have a problem with it.But if he led it at the Governor's house, or his church ,or even in the street, I wouldn't have a problem.The main reason I love the separation of church and state is because of the freedom it brings.If your idea was established, any person who wasn't of the faith that was chozen will feel like they are in a communist country. Why? They would Have to follow the religion of the state, like it or not.And I am not as sure as you that people are more loyal to their G-d as they are to the state. If that were true All Christians would go to church every Sunday.And what about the atheists? They would have to live under what they think is nonsense.How long would you live under something you didn't believe in. I think it would be the cause of endless civil wars.The Christians vs Jew vs Buddhists vs Wicca vs Muslims vs Hindus. Instead of bringing us together, it will tear us further apart than we apart already. Another reason the separation is a good thing is that the church will remain intact.If there werw a joining of church and state, the church would be forced to hire women clergy, and gays.I would love yo see women clergy and openly gay people in positions in their church, but I doubt if All churches would.That is why I hold the separation of church and state as one of the best ideas we have.I would willing die so my fellow Americans could choose which faith is for them. Or choose that none are for them.
@lecanis (16664)
• Murfreesboro, Tennessee
19 Nov 07
Theocracy leads to oppression. Period. Even if you tried to create a theocracy that only based its laws off a religion and didn't oppress people of other religions, it wouldn't work. Because the people of that majority state religion would feel superior, and abuse those of any other religion, and get away with it. As a non-Christian American, I have to say that as much as I love my country, if it became a formal theocracy I would have to find somewhere else to live. I will not be held to the laws of a God I don't follow. Following laws set into place to protect against violent crime, to protect people and property, etc, that's one thing. However, letting someone else legislate my morality is entirely different. Religious laws are not universal. There are many things that Christianity outlaws that as a Celtic Reconstructionist Pagan, I am completely comfortable doing. I won't let someone else tell me that I can't follow my path in my way just because they want their religion to rule everyone.
@mac1946 (1602)
• Calgary, Alberta
18 Nov 07
there always should have been and should now,be a complete seperation of church and state. dictatorships have basically all started from a state run by religious people. I live in Canada,at one time we were classed as a bible belt country because all the laws were made by the church. unfortunatly we cannot get rid of them. and those that follow the bible think it is fine,because they have never known how to think on their own. If you wish to live by the bible,fine,please do so,but do not expect me to fall in line with it. I do,as a Wiccan,beleive everyone has a right to their own beleifs,so long as they do not try shoving them down my throat. thank you.