Grieving mom says pastor cited God to get money !!

@Gordano (792)
United States
November 30, 2007 5:31pm CST
Cynthia Fleming buried her 23-year-old son, Marine Cpl. James T. Jenkins, in his dress uniform and all his medals on a rainy October afternoon in Ewing nearly two years ago. Mourners filed past the open casket. Women in black dresses wailed. Then Bishop Steven Parrott walked to the pulpit and looked into a grieving mother's eyes. In a sonorous baritone honed by decades of preaching, he told her: "Cynthia, be comforted, everyone in this room loves you." For months afterward, Parrott, a Newark pastor, called Fleming, a former Hamilton resident now living in Mount Holly. Parrott would lend a sympathetic ear as she talked about her fight to win death benefits for her son, a standout Nottingham High School wrestler and decorated Iraq veteran who suffered a breakdown after his second combat tour and ended up killing himself. Fleming vividly remembers when her relationship with the preacher began to change. It was March 15, 2006, the day she told Parrott she'd been awarded the insurance settlement. He called back a day later, she says, and told her God had begun speaking to him. God, he said, wanted him to borrow money. He was very specific about how much: $25,000. "The Lord told me to ask," she recalls him saying. "It's for my church." She wrote him a check the next day and two more checks over the next two months, $75,000 in all -- a hefty portion of the death benefit. Fleming was sure the preacher was good for it, they'd practically grown up together, neighbors on the border of Newark and East Orange, the son and daughter of preachers. In the weeks after asking for the loan, she said Parrott told her he had lined up a "multimillion grant" and could more than double her money by August 2006. It never happened. Now Fleming says she's lost hope she will ever see her money. http://blog.nj.com/timesupdates/2007/08/grieving_mom_says_pastor_cited.html What do You think about the Story ?
1 person likes this
6 responses
@lilaclady (28240)
• Australia
30 Nov 07
Firstly I will say I am not a religious person in this way although I believe there is somethig, so I do not wish to offend anyone but it has always been my belief all these people who preach to the people are just ordinary people living off the earnings of other people, all this has been proven by the things some of these ordinary people have been reported doing, I believe if the Churches...man made thing...wer true in their teachings their doors would never be closed except for keeping the cold out from the homeless people they would be sheltering, here in Australia all religions are Tax exempt and I think it is about time they started earning it, by helping the homeless that our new Prime Minister seems to be worried about, I think it should be the Churches who take in a lot of money from the people that they do not pay tax on and look after Gods children as they call them instead of our new Prime Minister who is going to use tax payers money on.
• Philippines
1 Dec 07
that is disgusting and that is one reason why so many people are disillusioned by religion. no wonder Jesus said that the love of money is the root of all evil. indeed, that was an act of pure evil, no doubt about it. and he's a pastor! shame on him!
@dickkell (403)
• United States
1 Dec 07
I received an e-mail today that said I won the foreign lottery. I checked and this is a scam that has taken quite a few people. There's another that says that I inherited money and this is the lawyer trying to get in touch. So do we say that the lottery is evil and that lawyers can't be trusted? No. These are scams. The "preacher" in the story was running a scam. She got caught up in it and lost big. That's sad, but it only speaks to the terrible evil of one person stealing from another with a scam. It says nothing about the broader community of religious workers or preachers. Here's a hint, people. If someone asks for money more than once, they're probably stealing it. You will never see your money again. That's how scams work. AND if someone wants you to pay them some amount of money on the promise of some much larger amount of money, that's probably a scam too. "Double her money" should have been a BIG clue! The second apeal for money should have stopped the gravy train too. That's just basic common sense.
@sephrenia (567)
1 Dec 07
I think that it takes a sick mind to go to a grieving mother and start telling her a wild story in order to get your hands on some money. I don't think this guy should have ever made it to the point of being a Bishop, obviously he's nt suited to the role if all he sees is easy money in front of him every time he gives a sermon. This is nothing to do with christianity except that this guy has given it a bad name. I'm not a christian but even I can see that it's guys like these that need booting out of the church because they're making it so that people will stop having faith in christianity. I hope the woman manages to get him through the courts or something because she deserves some peace and quiet.
@Ngippol (567)
• Philippines
1 Dec 07
It's very disheartening to know of such. It happens in many areas of the world. People using the name of God to get money! Well, if this pastor is really a Christian, he's not anymore now I think. He has fallen to the trap of the devil. It's true that nobody is perfect! We are all sinners anyway. But I hope we learn the lesson of the story.
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
1 Dec 07
Actually lila this is what the churches are supposed to be doing according to the bible and years ago they did. Then the government stepped with social services and started taking on the job that the churches were doing. we christains need to step up to the plate and start doing it again. We also need to hold these kind of people accountable. This pastor let greed get an his heart.