Mohammed meets Machiavelli

United States
December 9, 2007 11:08am CST
First, it was the flying Immans testing of airport crew members and passenger reactions to suspicious Muslim activity while simutanously laying the groundwork for a potentially very profitable lawsuit while even further simutanously making an effort to diminish future airline and passenger response to suspicious acting Muslims. Absolutely brillant! Machiavelli would have been proud. Now, we have this. http://www.familysecuritymatters.org/challenges.php?id=1385815 While not potentially lucrative monetarily, this little scam was brillant. If there is not a Machiavellian school of public relations, there should be. Please, if you agree with me that radical Muslims have possibly been learning a thing or two from Machiavelli, tell us why. If you disagree, please tell us that, too.
5 people like this
4 responses
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
12 Dec 07
The Muslims are instructed to deceive non-Muslims by their so-called religion/political system, and this has been the case long before there even was a Machiavelli. This is simply the normal way to deal with non-Muslims for them. Anything that any Muslim says should be suspect because of this.
5 people like this
• United States
12 Dec 07
A simple psychological analysis of what makes Islamic jokes funny reveals a deep seated jealously of non-Muslims with successful lives and an envy of rich successful people, whether they be Muslim or not. As people who can not compete honestly often resort to deception, this leads to exactly the kind of behavior we see at the link.
3 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
12 Dec 07
OK Red, I've gotta' ask, what is your source for Muslim jokes? I've gotta' see this. Thx!
2 people like this
• United States
12 Dec 07
I did my own analysis after reading some samples of jokes Muslims think are funny. If you know what a person thinks is funny you can actually deduce quite a bit about their personality. I am my own source for this. I suppose I should look up the jokes and write a serious article about the subject. That would really make the world of Islam happy!
3 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
12 Dec 07
Hello Red, I meant to respond to this question earlier. Alas, I've has so little spare time lately. Anyway, I'm not on board with the supposition that Machiavelli would be proud of Mr. Vickers, CAIR, or any sleezy, underhanded, duplicitious userers. Machiavelli generally gets a very bad rap. Erroneously, I might add. Machiavelli was the consumate political pragmatist, who carefully weighed the tite-rope relationship between rulers and the ruled. He managed, directed and supported local militias, not mercenaries or hired thugs. He was a skilled negotiator, and a brilliant political strategist. Europe's history might have developed very differently if the Pope had not interceded on behalf of the Medici's. Although I suspect Machiavelli would appreciate how CAIR and its sleezy consorts have politically figured out how to use the honorable governing system of our Founding Fathers against us. I also recognize that he would have called them out on their duplicitious nature, and the underhanded deceptive, self-supportive fundraising they are engaging in. Though he appreciated strategic competition, he would not hold silent his tongue in the face of dishonorable competition. Contrary to what many believe, Machiavelli did not support the theory that the ends justify the means. That erroneous assumption was primarily attributed to him by the return of the Medici family to power after Papal intervention in the political affairs of 15th century Florence. Now to address CAIR, outside of any analogy to Machiavelli: CAIR is and has been raising every conceivable red flag for We The People. Yet, they have not been stripped of their charitable standing, and have escaped criminal prosecution. The latter I suspect more because of rubber-spined prosecutors who value re-election in heavily populated Muslim Michigan, more than valueing the principles of right and wrong. Their charitable standing needs to be suspended until all the legal cases have been tried. Then, either lock 'em up, deport them, or allow them to continue on their dangerous and duplicitous road of destruction. Cowardly members of the criminal justice world are allowing CAIR to do damage to this country. This must stop!
2 people like this
• United States
12 Dec 07
Wow! (Tips hat...) I bow to your superior knowledge of Machiavelli, his methods and history. That was quite impressive. Are you a history buff, or possibly a political science expert ? I've never met anyone with this much knowledge of Machiavelli. As to CAIR, it seems so obvious to me that you are right that I wonder what is wrong with this country that your advice was not followed yesterday.
3 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
13 Dec 07
Hello Red, Machiavelli was a fascinating character. I'd bet that you would thorougly enjoy studying up on him. He was a traditional scholar/warrior archetype. I was first introduced to his work by way of "The Prince", while I was earning my first degree in Pol.Sci/I.R. I detected in "The Prince" the mind of an author who trusted mankind's ability to learn from analogy. The history buff in me was inspired to further research the man and his achievements. It was both a fascinating and rewarding experience. Of course, it only adds to his allure that few historical figures have been so ferociously debated. As for CAIR, my recent question (which you responded to -- thank you) about the feasibility of Democracy & Islam coexsting was very much motivated by the duplicitious actions of CAIR. I admit that I am deeply troubled by the predicament that our Republic finds itself in today. Specifically, that the inclusive nature of the US system of governance might yet be its downfall. What's particularly interesting is: Though most generally acknowledge the foresight of the Founding Fathers, there seems have been a huge disconnect on the susceptibility of infiltration by use of our own inclusive system against us. I suspect the Founders believed that the oceans protected us from such an invasion from within. Yet, the first war the USA fought was against the Muslim Barbary Pirates. Hmmm, perhaps the Founders were fallible afterall?
2 people like this
• United States
13 Dec 07
Without question the 'Founding Fathers' were fallible. Witness slavery. But that's why the constitution can be admended. Even still, the constitution is the 2d or 3rd best constitution of any country on earth, in my opinion. The first? Japan's constitution was written mostly by General Douglas McCarthur while military ruler of Japan just after WWII. It is essentially a modern update of the orginal US Constitution. Turns out the General was quite the scholar. Japan has done all right with that constitution, don't you think? The other possible first? Switzerland has a constitution much like the USA only they follow it. I will look into the 'PRINCE'. Sounds good.
3 people like this
@The_Eagle_1 (1123)
• Australia
30 Dec 07
Well my friend, we know my feelings about the devious, maniulative and repressive attitudes and actions of the muslim contingent in general, and the comments passed in lengthy fashion too I might add, without being boring, have much merit attached to them.
2 people like this
• United States
30 Dec 07
The eagle has landed yet again. Yes, I do think most of the comments to this thread have merit. The internet is doing a good job of letting people become informed as to the Islamic scam.
2 people like this
@kamran12 (5555)
• Pakistan
2 Jan 08
Hello redyellowblackdog! I hope everything is fine at your end! Well, I think that C.A.I.R has just acquainted itself with a famous English Idiom: “When in Rome, do as the Romans do!” :-)
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Jan 08
Hello, kamran! Yes, things are fine here as I hope they are with you, too. As to Rome, that's good advice.
1 person likes this
@kamran12 (5555)
• Pakistan
4 Jan 08
Nah, it wasn't an advice. It was just an observation.