Pedagogues; which vision on growing up would you choose for your child?

@cyberfluf (5005)
Netherlands
December 31, 2007 4:40pm CST
Being a pedagogical sciences (social studies) student I would like to take a poll here to see which vision on growing up you think is the best for a child. I will give a very short explanition below, it isn't complete and just a very narrow guideline for the people who have no clue what so ever on these people. I hope it helps enough to make a well argumented choice! :) There are the following ones you can choose from: Rudolph Steiner - An anthroposophist who says that children have basicly the same fases in childhood they all go through about the same age, so they get classes with children of the same age. Art is an important part of the studies of the children, they need to work with mind, heart and hands. Helen Parkhurst - Children of different ages help each other out, there aren't specific guidelines on what groups the children are in. There are 3 main rules: freedom, working together and being independant. Maria Montessori - Experiencing through experiences is important. In this school there are specific materials the children use, they make their own chores and control their own work. Taking care of the own environment is essential. There are three different groups, with in their turn 2 or 3 yeargroups. A child will be a youngest, middle and oldest student 2 or 3 times thanks to this system. They can learn from older/younger or same ages kids. Peter Peterson - Children take their own responsibilty, they work with chores and make plans on how to do this. The children are made ready for the society. There are 3 groups just like with maria montessori. Celestin Freinet - Learning from the area around you. Learning about clams? Get them into the classroom or go outside. Writing stories about them, drawing about them, etc. Discussing these stories helps the children to learn about each other. The teacher makes the lessons according to what the childrens interests are. _______________________________________________________ I have a soft spot for Rudolph Steiner, I had an internship on a school that worked according to his vision. It was very interesting, lots of individual attention for the kids and the teacher made the lessons all by themselves and not off paper like a lot. They really made the lessons suitable for the kids and according to their interest. I loved the attention for art and social contacts being a fan of song, dance and painting myself. I do think you have to be a certain type of person to go to this type of school.
2 responses
@dreamy1 (3815)
• United States
31 Dec 07
I picked this model... Celestin Freinet - Learning from the area around you. Learning about clams? Get them into the classroom or go outside. Writing stories about them, drawing about them, etc. Discussing these stories helps the children to learn about each other. The teacher makes the lessons according to what the childrens interests are. I think hands on work is good to thoroughly learn about a subject. I also think using one's imagination is also important for learning and asking questions about and exploring one's surroundings.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
31 Dec 07
Thank you for your reply and your arguments. They make a lot of sence to me. Both children and adults learn through experiences, there is no doubt about that and imagination also helps us to think of solutions for problems we never experienced before; therefore it is an unreplaceable ability for todays society with all the complex problems we have to face. Very well said and all the best for the new year!
@Debs_place (10525)
• United States
1 Jan 08
These are all interesting models in a perfect world - I am going to address each of these in the context of my son. Steiner - my son did not like arts - he had visual tracking problems and fine motor skills problems - forget this. Parkhurst - my son was a great person to help other people, he is a people person Montessori - my son was a great work avoider - his choice of chores would be figuring out ways to avoid doing work. Peterson - same as Montessori Freinert - This might have worked for him Steiner again - learning what he is interested in - he would be an expert in lacrosse and hockey
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
1 Jan 08
I guess that's how it goes with most these things, they are visions and theories so they most likely will not completely work practically; but still it's nice to know that there are people who care enough about children to think up systems that might help them learn better. Thank you for giving such a clear and commented answer, using your son as an example makes it easy to read and follow. All the best.