Hormonal teenagers

@Debs_place (10528)
United States
January 7, 2008 10:21am CST
Yes, we all know that hormones can change the personality of our kids as they grow up and that no parent really enjoys those wacky years but as my son so aptly said...he didn't either. So here is my wacky story. My son was about 11 when the hormones started kicking in, one minute he was a nice kid, the next he was a raging hormonal teenager. Well one day, he was smiling and laughing then all of sudden he was arguing with me for no reason. I looked and said 'Matt I don't like how you are acting!' He looked at me, broke down into tears and said 'Mom, I don't either!' It made me realize he had even less control over it then I did. I laugh at this conversation now but it gave me great insight into his life at the time. Do you have any stories to help parents get through those rough years?
4 people like this
5 responses
• India
7 Jan 08
Even though I can never say that I have been a parent myself,I think that I know because my parents had told me how my behaviour changed as I moved innto my teens. I dont think I really wanted to behave like that.I was beginning to quarrel with my friends and they seemed to get away from me.But I am lucky that my parents were understanding.They said that these things happen during every one's teens.Its just a matter of growng up. Now I feel more attached to my parents.I feel more free and I am just 21.I dont smoke,I dont drink,Yet I feel chilled.
@polachicago (19077)
• United States
8 Jan 08
Happy in the morning, depressed over lunch time and angry in the evening? It was me when I was about 12 years old. It is not only about hormones. It is also about "Ugly Duckling"...syndrome...lol I was very pretty thinking that I am very ugly... My mother was always cool and somehow she survived....:)
@Debs_place (10528)
• United States
8 Jan 08
And what is worse, you know at that age, kids are so cruel, I have seen one girl call a little twig of a thing fat and the poor kid seriously believed she was. You had hormones..and they probably contributed to your feeling of being an ugly duckling and at that age we all feel awkward and self conscious just because of the changes in our bodies too.
@polachicago (19077)
• United States
8 Jan 08
I wish to have todays confidence with yesterday body...he, he...
@AmbiePam (48106)
• United States
8 Jan 08
Oh, that is sweet. I feel for people at that age. I kept thinking I was going through this 'teenage' thing, and that was why my behavior was so different. Later on in life I found out I was bipolar. Frankly, I can't see much difference in being a teenager and an untreated bipolar!
2 people like this
@Debs_place (10528)
• United States
8 Jan 08
You know, I hadn't thought of that but bipolar and hormonal teenage years are very similar in appearance. I wonder if a mood stabilizer could help teenagers? Might be research worth doing!
@GardenGerty (96612)
• Marion, Kansas
8 Jan 08
My son was fourteen and we had a very similar discussion. This was the child that I thought loved me best, at the time. Suddenly he growled and flamed at everything I said, slamming doors and the whole bit. I think the breakthrough moment for us was in the bedroom part of our house, upstairs. He said something, stalked off, slammed the bathroom door. I knocked, went in, and said "I do not like it when you talk to me that way, and it has to stop, you make me feel bad, like I do not even count." He said "Mom, can't you see, I am trying to do better." And it did seem like, from that day on, he and I both did better.
@Debs_place (10528)
• United States
8 Jan 08
That is a very similar conversation! Wow, now you can look back at it and laugh, but wow, those times are frustrating. No one has ever come up with a remedy for those teenage years. I don't think anyone ever will. But I guess there is comfort in knowing we are not alone.
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
8 Jan 08
Oh goodness - I'm in the process of writing a book on this subject of sorts - "The Ramblings of Faith" is filled with these stories. As a single mother of 4 for 16 years now I've been both mother and father for most of that time to 3 boys (my daughter's father has been involved in her life). My best advice for parents would be 'This too will pass' - they do grow out of it if you can just hang in there. Short story - 2 oldest sons blew up one day and decided together that I was the worst mother in the world, I would never see them nor my grandchildren (when I had them) and both moved out - one was 17 the other 19. It didn't last long and when I got a phone call at 3 a.m. in the morning from my oldest son saying 'He's here' I was thrilled my son took me to the hospital (insisted on driving) and I was the first grandparent to hold my first grandchild. I told my son now I know why I had kids - for the grandkids... Those hormones go crazy but in most cases they do calm down in time.
@Debs_place (10528)
• United States
8 Jan 08
Congratulations! You became a Grandmother and reunited with your son at the same time! Talk about monumental. Yes, I think we all know it passes but it sure does pass slowly. BTW How did things turn out with your youngest? Is he home?
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
8 Jan 08
:) youngest is home, at least for the time being. Thanks to you and a few others he came up with $150, not near what they wanted but the judge took into consideration that even adults can't find jobs in our area and his probation officer went to back for him - he's doing great in school and every one at the school loves him. The judge did say the amount was far from what he has to pay but that was much better than nothing.... He goes back in Feb and the judge will decide then if he'll get off probation or not but will give him time to pay on the fines and all.