A story of disaster avoided!

United States
February 6, 2008 2:28pm CST
I've had various stomach acid disorders for years... actually, it seems like forever. My family doc sent me to a specialist to see about an endoscopy. The spec. recommended the test, and in the course of taking my other medical history, learned I had experienced some minor rectal bleeding. He suggested, since I was going to have the "top" end scoped, I might as well have the other end done, too - a colonoscopy. I'm 48, so I had never given having one any thought, and my first impulse was to say, no thanks. Upon reflection, I realized that my Honey is 53 and still hasn't had her first colonoscopy. Perhaps, if I went first, I'd have more leverage to persuade her to go. I think her dad had a colon problem, so I agreed to the second test. The preparation for the colonoscopy is a major drag - your lower bowel has to be cleaned out. The day before the test was miserable, but the tests themselves were a breeze - over and done in less than 3 hours, from walking in to walking out the door. They said everything looked fine, and they'd mail me pathology results in a few weeks. When I started to get the bills a couple of weeks later, I was kinda freaked. It looked like I'd be on the hook for about $1000 for the experience, there's about 7 different bills for the various aspects of the procedure. Then I got a letter from the specialist. He told me that the polyps they took out of my colon and rectum were adenomas. These are the kind that turn into cancer. He recommends that I be scoped every other year until 60, and annually thereafter. He also recommends that any first degree relatives of mine over the age of 40 get scoped sooner rather than later, because the risk runs in families. I started thinking, holy cow, just imagine... if I had waited until I turned 50, then I probably wouldn't have gone right away, maybe put it off until 51. I could easily have procrastinated myself into a bout with colon or rectal cancer! How about that? I went in early for my Honey's benefit, and may very well have saved my own life. Who says good intentions go unrewarded?
2 people like this
4 responses
@p1kef1sh (45640)
6 Feb 08
Wow, what a story. Thank heavens you had the tests etc, I think that you made a very sensible decision, and one that is undoubtedly life changing for you. I hope that things continue to be OK. Maybe your Honey will be more inclined to go now. Good luck to you both.
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45640)
24 Mar 08
Did he go and how are you? Thank you so much for the BR.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Mar 08
I'm very well, thank you, and Honey's innards are still unseen by human eyes. I haven't given up, though. I just try to be patient and pick moments to give a reminder that's a little funny. I don't think I can be funny enough to completely distract from the mechanics of the whole thing, though! You're very welcome!
@mummymo (23707)
8 Feb 08
Oh wow gg my friend how fortunate that you did go for the second test! I know you didn't go for your own sake and that it has proved very expensive but put that side by side with the risk of developing cancer and not knowing until it was a lot more advanced and well all I will say is that $1000 dollars is well worth it for the sake of your health! I sure hope that your honey will follow suit! Just goes to prove that the old(ish) saying 'no good deed goes unpunished' isn't true after all! xxxx
2 people like this
@CAMILLERI (373)
• Australia
6 Feb 08
You did the right thing. Polyps are very common. Prevention here is definitely better than cure. If you let them get hold of you things can get very nasty. Best wishes.
2 people like this
• United States
6 Feb 08
It is good that you listened to your Honey. We do know best! It is scary that it could have been worse if you had waited until the recommended age. I am glad that things worked out so well for you! Remember to let your family know so that they can get checked. It may be uncomfortable but it is necessary to keep you healthy and cancer free.