Older Adults (Seniors) Returning to College

@Annie2 (594)
United States
March 1, 2008 11:48am CST
Are you an older adult or senior citizen who has returned to college? I am. I am 53 and am working on my Bachelor's degree in Professional Writing on the creative track. I have had an Associate's degree for many years, but have always wanted to get that Bachelor's, but life seemed to keep getting in the way. Now that I have raised my daughter, I should be free to do what I want, but instead have been raising my niece since she was 16 months old (now 8 yrs old)-- I decided it is now or never! If you are back in school, what degree are you working toward? What motivated you to return to school at this later point in your life? Are you finding it difficult? I have a hard time finding the time and energy to do what I need to. I am taking my courses through distance learning rather than in the classroom -- except for math classes -- I need the classroom environment and help for math.
1 person likes this
3 responses
@mtsandeep (1586)
• India
25 Jun 08
I am an engineering student, 21 years old. Happy to see senior citizen back to college. So its true that there is no age limit for learning. best of luck for your college life.
1 person likes this
@Annie2 (594)
• United States
25 Jun 08
Good luck to you. At age 21 you have much more energy available to you for learning. Make the best of it!
• United States
22 Mar 08
I am a university librarian and for what it's worth, I LOVE older students. Adults who have returned to get a college degree - especially senior citizens - are there for the education, are dedicated, and WANT to be there (unlike the traditional-age students who are there so they can put off working full time for 4 more years). We have a student right now who must be 80 if she's a day - and she is completely into learning everything she can, even all the computer stuff. Way to go, all of you who are doing this!
@Annie2 (594)
• United States
25 Jun 08
In my classwork I do a great deal of writing. I asked one of my instructors if the writing was much different between the young students and the older students. She said there was a definite difference. She said the experiences of life and the wisdom gained was evident in the writing of the older folks. There is quite a different insight which she said she really enjoys reading.
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
1 Mar 08
I'm not going now but a few years ago I did go back to college. I decided I needed to do something with my life and after doing a lot of research decided to try the medical area - there are always jobs in many different fields. Well, decided on Radiology, an associates thinking once I had a job in that field I could continue and get into Ultrasound... Yea right - I did great in everything and as I've always loved school I found no difference really except I got totally frustrated. To get accepted into the program you had to have a 3.5 in Medical Terminology - I'm horrid at both spelling and foriegn languages which are very much needed in this class. First time I took it I got 2.5, second time 3.0 and then found out there had been over 100 people apply for the program and they only accepted 12 :( I decided the medical field just wasn't for me. I took my math classes (algebra and advanced algebra) online and loved it but math has always been my strong subject.
1 person likes this
@Annie2 (594)
• United States
6 Mar 08
Well, Faith, I'm sorry to hear it didn't work out for you. It isn't easy. I'm actually having a hard time this semester and I don't even have math. Actually, my courses are easy (relatively) this semester. There is a lot of reading, writing and hard work, but nothing that difficult. My problem has seemed to be with motivation, being sick with flu-like viruses all winter, and finding time. All not very good excuses. I just can't seem to get into it. My grade point average is 3.97 and I am close to blowing that. I guess I need to dig deep and find my motivation in there somewhere.