Could Moses & his followers just been high?

@sedel1027 (17868)
United States
March 5, 2008 9:36am CST
One research seems to think so. One of the plants, Harmal, found in the desert, has been long revered by Jewish people as a curing plant that is also a hallucinogen. The brew can cause hallucinogen of light and is accompanied by profound religious and spiritual feelings. Full story: http://africa.reuters.com/odd/news/usnL04178076.html
2 people like this
8 responses
@ClarusVisum (2163)
• United States
6 Mar 08
Actually, there seems to be no real evidence of the events of Exodus having happened at ALL, much less being a mere exaggeration. Doesn't anyone think it's fishy that this large group of people apparently spent forty YEARS in the same desert (one that actually takes about ten days to cross--you'd think God would give Moses a better sense of direction--haven't those slaves been through enough? lol), yet there isn't the slightest bit of archeological evidence of their presence? I call shenanigans.
1 person likes this
@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
6 Mar 08
LOL, there may have been a exodus, but I don't think it took 40 years. There are so many thing sin the Bible that people see as fact but are completely exaggerated or not translated correctly.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Mar 08
To be fair, there is ample explanation in the story as to why it took 40 days. Bear in mind, either through faith or if you read it as fiction through the suspension of disbelief, that they were on foot. It may take ten days to cross the entire desert today it would take significantly longer. No, not 40 years, but a while nonetheless. Further to that, we don't know how long they were in the desert before G-d revealed H-mself to the nation at Mt. Sinai. Shortly thereafter there was the fiasco with the golden calf, which made G-d very angry. He said, then, that no man present would ever enter the Promised Land. He intentionally imposed upon them the 40 years in the desert - enough time for the generation of the calf to die. Remember, even Moses never set foot in the Promised Land. Whether you take it on faith or as a story, there is exposition.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Mar 08
Forty days? Exodus 16:35 clearly says it was forty years. And I meant ten days on foot--in other words, without any technology etc. to help you, you could cross that desert in under two weeks easily.
1 person likes this
@Sissygrl (10999)
• Canada
5 Mar 08
lol i guess that would explain a lot wouldnt it sedel ? I dont wanna really get into this discussion because it could become VERY contrivercial, however, I wanted to say that it make me giggle. Thanks for the laugh ;)
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@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
5 Mar 08
Thats why I posted it. I got a good laugh from the topic. I read the title out loud to a girl at work, she got a good laugh as well.
2 people like this
@Sissygrl (10999)
• Canada
5 Mar 08
i'm surprised you haven't gotten any religous responders wanting to knock your block off! LOL.
1 person likes this
@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
6 Mar 08
LOL me too, the only person who is putting up any kind of fight is Oreo. Most people are seeing the Exodus as just a story.
2 people like this
5 Mar 08
i thought of this all the time in religon class back in high school ;)
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@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
6 Mar 08
LOL So you went to Catholic school too, eh?
1 person likes this
@pumpkinjam (5498)
• United Kingdom
6 Mar 08
I have seen a similar discussion posted a few times but chose to respond to yours as the others all appeared to assume it was not true! Anyway, yes I could quite believe that. One thing I don't understand is how come nowadays people think you're mad if you have those sort of halucinations but someone had them 2000 years ago and now it's written in a book supposedly of truth? I'm not saying any religion is wrong or right but there is a logical explanation for many "miracles".
@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
6 Mar 08
If that book was being written today, people would not believe it at all. If we could go back and time and actually see these situations ourselves, I highly doubt anyone would follow the bible.
1 person likes this
• United Kingdom
7 Mar 08
Well, I have decided there are leprichauns at the bottom of my garden. Do you think if I write an illogical book about it describing what I had seen and got a couple of people to write a paragraph or two then people would start a new religion about it?
@urbandekay (18314)
5 Mar 08
Read the report, don't buy it. Some obvious problems with the theory all the best urban
@sedel1027 (17868)
• United States
5 Mar 08
I guess, but his theory is very easily accepted. Back then people smoked and drank all kind of concoctions and were high/drunk quite often, regardless of what "God" wanted.
1 person likes this
• United Kingdom
7 Mar 08
I am sure there are problems with the theory but there are also problems with the Bible, particularly the bits that contradict itself.
• Philippines
19 Aug 08
I don't know if this true or not. But I believe bible is not a hallucination
• Romania
18 May 08
Science has always tried to search for a way to understand what it does not understand, using material means, and that's where it always fails. Because it's limited to the technical and material means. I don't think they were just "high" (at least not as "high" as most of the people might have been when they voted Bush for the second time in the US :))just joking ).
• United States
8 Mar 08
that some down stuf righ there i'm guess i'm one of those relgions then i be high like everyday