Homeschool Materials

United States
March 12, 2008 1:32am CST
I was wondering if anyone knew where I could get any good non-Christian homeschool materials. I've tried researching on the Internet, but the only sources I could find are Christian-based. I've looked through many of these Christian-based courses, and didn't like what I see. If Christian parents want to give their children materials that will make the kids end up failing college, go for it. From what I've seen, they put the Bible and God first in all the lessons, while at the same time getting most of the facts totally wrong. The only good one I've found so far was Penn Foster, but they are SO expensive! I don't actually want to homeschool myself you see, I just want the study materials for my future children. Everything from Kindergarten-teen are some things I plan on looking through. I also plan on getting some educational board games like Life and Monopoly to help the kids learn good life skills (counting money and tiles are good ones from these games). What do you all think? Could anyone possible help me find some stuff?
1 person likes this
6 responses
@reene0225 (352)
• United States
16 Apr 08
The only places I can think of off hand that might have non-Christian based materials would be amazon.com or ebay maybe. I think you have a great idea getting materials for helping your future children learn. However be careful because it might be outdated by the time your children are old enough to use it. Now the board games are a great idea too those will never be outdated. They've been around so long already. Good luck in your search for materials.
• United States
17 Apr 08
Yeah, amazon and ebay are pretty good sources to find rare and unusual stuff. Oops, I put the part of my response to this comment in the post above lol. Well, I'll put it simply here too. I'm gonna try and find stuff that may not be outdated (like basic math) to hold on to for later on. Yeah, and the boardgames are really fun for everyone too hehe. The whole family can play those together to spend time and the kids learn things with them too. Thanks for the wishing me luck!
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Apr 08
No problem for the luck. We all need it sometimes.
• United States
15 Apr 08
Shop around is my best answer. There is a great majority of Christian home-schoolers, so finding a boxed curriculum that isn't somewhat faith based is pretty difficult. But you don't have to go the boxed route, you can pick and choose per your child's strengths, weaknesses, and interests. I love Discovery they have a ton of hands on things, more for a little older kids, but definitely worth buying in advance. Things like robotics, engineering, and techy stuff. Timberdoodle has a lot of faith curriculum, but another great place to buy things individually and you'll find a lot of hands on activities and such. Even if a child grows into a visual or auditory learner, they all start out kinesthetic (hands on) so these type of things are great tools. And you could check into your local teachers store, there you may find grade appropriate text books, or supplemental materials such as base ten blocks, counting bears, tanigram pieces, beakers, bunsen burners, safety goggles, and things like that One more tid bit. You commented that you don't want to home school yourself, but you do want to home school your children. That sounds like a world of trouble if you ask me. I have learned three times as much through schooling my children than I ever did in public school myself.(and we're not even half way!) Each day is a new day to learn something. And I learn right along side my children. Heck, sometimes they even teach me things, its an awesome experience.
• United States
17 Apr 08
Thank you for the response and advice. I see some good things in Timberdoodle (I get the catalog) and I'll might order some stuff out of that. When I said that I wasn't going to homeschool, I meant that I had already graduated, so I don't need to worry about getting a diploma for myself. I will be (hopefully) going to college soon and I'm gonna apply for government grants next week so I can go. It's pretty hard to pay for college without a job lol. During the weekend I saw some kid show on PBS, and they were teaching stuff on there that I didn't even learn in school, so I understand how some stuff can get outdated over time. I'll need to find stuff that will not change (like math, adding and subtracting. Although you can use everyday objects for that).
• United States
17 Apr 08
Thanks for the best response :) I like to see that pencil next to my name.:) I'm really glad I could pass on some helpful ideas to you. That's all I have, ideas. What works for one family may not work for the next. I also wanted to comment to not write off your local dollar stores. We find little workbooks, puzzles, games and crafty things at ours all the time. Very rarely are the materials "faith based" but if that is truly an issue, you can sort through things, and just chose ones that meat your family's needs. I really like the Disney workbooks. They have spelling, math, geography, early reading, science, and tons more. One of our dollar stores here carry them, so we go in about once every three or four months and stock up on them. They keep the kids busy, and they think they are playing in a coloring book, that's the best part!
@avonrep1 (1862)
• United States
19 Mar 08
Another good way to get education material's that are not Christian based, is educational software. American Advantage, Encore, Dk and Topic are all good for educational software. Topic even makes a state standard testing software with all 50 states for each grade level, it has 200 different verison of the test for each state too. Its a really great way to see where your kid is at in their subjects. You might be interested in checking out my yahoo group. If you go to yahoo then to groups you can find us by typing in Paganwiccanhomeschoolers. Yeah I wanted to make sure the Bible belt stays away. lol
• United States
20 Mar 08
Thanks for the advise avonrep1. I'll go and visit your group when I have time. lol at the Bible Belt comment.
@sisterjinx (1136)
• United States
29 Apr 08
This too was my dilema. As we are not "Christian", this is not to say we are not spiritual, I did not want my children recieving an education that was not of our beliefs and that would simply confuse them. I see someone else has already said one thing I was going to say and that is that you will probably not find a boxed curriculum set that is not Christian. My hope is that as more and more people begin homeschooling for reasons other than religion the makers of Curriculums will address this need for more traditional curriculum sets. Until that time we must pick and choose. Math is relatively easy to find. As it is difficult to bring religion into it, though I have found at least one that did. I prefer, right now, to use the Key-to Curriculums for our math. English was a challenge for us as well but not to bad. I use a lot of the books from Mr. Paperback. They carry a good amount of learning materials in their education section. Science and History have always been the most difficult. Sometimes you can find good materials for this on Ebay, which are usually older textbooks that are no longer used in schools. A lot of what we do is hands on, computer programs we have found, or online research and learning for these two subjects. As far as other subjects you can also add things as you like. We have been studying Spanish for a couple of years now. We finally got a really good program for the computer that makes learning a game. It's called "instant immersion. spanish v2.0". In my opinion it would work for any child age 10 and up. We also work on Mythology and use a lot of different sources for our material. Books about the history of Greece that we find at the library, online websites, and even movies like Hercules. All of these spurn discussions that lead to healthy learning. Anyway, it is alost a temporary full time job to find non-religious material to homeschool with but it is out there. Once you find something that works for you it stops being so frusterating. Good luck
• United States
27 Apr 08
If you do a search for secular educational materials you should find lots of stuff.You can also do a search for secular lesson plans or curriculum and will find a lot of websites that are geared towards that. Don't be shy about looking for stuff that school teachers use. After all...that's what you're teaching your kids. I'm not sure if you're wanting online (where there's more teacher involvement), a particular style or just what you might like. I will tell you that if this is for future kids you might find that your kids have different things that work for them (even between kids) than what you have in mind.And even when a style works for a child one year that may change as they get older.My advice is to stay flexible. That said, for online schools check with internethomeschool.com or globalvillageschool.org Many states also offer online schooling options now too but they are still public schools.A really good general resource and place to learn more about the different styles in general is homeschoollearning.com Starfall.com is my favorite place for early reading skills. Enchantedlearning.com has tons of printables and craft ideas.If you like the way that kids can access classes on online classrooms but want to customize the materials yourself you can try hotchalk.com or moodle.com. Just come up for a name for your school to be listed under :) Some other stuff I've used (yeah, we're pretty eclectic here): http://homeschooling.about.com Books by McGraw Hill (they even have a book on life skills for kids) For high school many colleges are also starting to offer online options for highschoolers where some of the classes are counted towards college credit as well as highschool. Kids.gov has a list of government websites that are geared towards teaching kids. I really could go on for pages...there's a lot out there. I'm also working on trying to put together a curriculum where you can choose to get just an individual subject for a given grade level or the entire package. It's slow going though since I'm doing this while taking care of infants (twins) and homeschooling our oldest.lol! I just about have the preschool level done. There's just a lot that can be done and a lot of different styles available.Enjoy your journey!
@tcolwell (138)
26 Apr 08
I am a Christian and will instill those values in my children, but I have to agree with you that the Christian homeschool curriculums I've seen are not the best choice for educating. I can teach my kids Christian values outside of math and language arts. Have you checked out SAXON. They have an amazing math curriculum. I'm a former teacher and have looked over the curriculum because I am considering homeschooling. If you go to the website they have a number you can call to order a free sample of K-2 math. They even have a free assessment you can download and print to find out what level to start your child at.