Do you live in the south, Have you ever been stereotyped ?

United States
May 1, 2008 7:13pm CST
Do you live in the south and have been in the south living your whole life ? I have and sometimes people really get on my nerves that don't live here and understand that they are just as diffrent to us. I mean everyone is sterotyped to a point. Most of us are guilty of doing it to others and probally don't realize it is happing. I think the "HillBilly's from the Appalachian Mountains is probally one of the stereotypes I am talking about. There is people in this world that actually belive we live like that. Sure some people have no teeth , wear overalls with straw hanging out of their mouths,but goodness that does not include us all. Do you feel you have ever been sterotyped like this in one way or the other ? If you can please explain if you can.
9 responses
@taface412 (3177)
• United States
2 May 08
I am from Chicago originally, but grew up in the South. So if you wanna talk about stereotypes I have heard it from both ends of the pole. For example, in the south everyone thinks anyone from up North is stuck up. And I have had numerous people tell me this as I was growing up. But a little tid bit for you. Up north you cannot be friendly to everyone, because you never know what you are going to get in response. Unlike in the South where a "hello" is a friendly gesture. And up North people's lives move much faster paced. And an example for the the South. When I was in college and I got a new roommate the only thing she knew about me was my first and last name and that I was from KY. Well, my name is quite common among the African American ethinicity (both first and last) and she figured being from the south that I was African American. And on move in day she told me this story almost as a sign of relief when she saw that I was caucasin. And then she started asking about wearing shoes on other days of the week besides Sunday.... Either way my lesson from all of these experiences and I have had plenty is that you just have to go with it. You can learn a lot about a person when they show you these tidbits of their personality and you then choose what it is you will allow in your life that way. Plus, have they ever walked in your "Sunday" shoes? Most likely not.
1 person likes this
@WNCKen (32)
• United States
2 May 08
Oh, man do I feel your pain! I was born in a tiny, speck-of-a-town in Indiana. When I was nine, we moved to Daytona Beach, Florida. When I graduated High School, I moved to the mountains of North Carolina (Asheville). For at least 10 years, when I told people where I've lived, I heard: "Oh, a YANKEE." "Oh, a Floridiot." "Oh, a Yankee who became a Floridiot." Sheesh. Actually, I was a Mid-Westerner first. Never a Yankee. Finally, I married a girl FROM the area and gradually became accepted. I've now lived here for 23 years, more half of my life. Yes, I have adopted the accent, but I can still force myself to speak with the monotone accent of a mid-westerner.
1 person likes this
@taface412 (3177)
• United States
2 May 08
It's funny isn't...because I only have a Southern accent when I go up north...and I only have a Northern accent when I am down south....when I actually I speak the same in either location. SO what kind of accent do I have a "NourthSouthern accent"....but i have noticed no one mentions my accent when I am in southern Illinois or parts of Indiana. Good to know there other nomads out there....
1 person likes this
• United States
3 May 08
I can remeber my mamaw saying "get your sunday best on we are going out to eat." That meant you better look nice cause we wasn't going through the drive- thru. I guess thats alot like the sunday shoes.When I did telemarketing in vacation sales I could often hear people complain if our leads were coming from up north. They claimed we would get cussed out more than usual and more hang-ups. I did not find it to be true.
@fifileigh (3619)
• United States
3 May 08
i was raised in wva when i was little but i dont remember any stereotypes. i just remember the american indians were jealous of white race. most black people were on welfare. and other ethnic races were more intellectual. then when i moved to california, i met 2 aryan germans with red hair who tell people they are irish because they are very jealous of the irish race. i have met all kinds of crazy people in my lifetime.
1 person likes this
• United States
4 May 08
I'm really not sure how to respond to this,as I don't want to offend you. However I think that assuming things about a certain race is in the same catogory. I think making a statment like American Indians are jealous of the white man,and most black people were on welfare is stereotyping someone.
@fifileigh (3619)
• United States
4 May 08
whether you like it or not, that is how it was in the south where i grew up in. i was aware of it because i meet different people and chat with different people all the time. i was even close with some of them and knew them well. if you dont want to believe it, you just cant handle the truth. sorry to burst your bubble, but this is reality, whether you like it or not. i just say it how it is on here, answering and responding honestly for fun, and if you cant handle my honesty, then dont read my responses.
@ruby222 (4848)
2 May 08
Hi,well I live in the United kingdom,but we have a north south thing here too!..Peoples ideas of life in the north versus life in the south is different ,when in actual fact theres no diffrence!!Ive lived in both the north and the south and find both areas just about the same!
• United States
3 May 08
I have alsways lived in the south. My husband however has lived both places. He says there is a diffrence as people are more laid back here and just little things like that. Basically when it comes down to it we are all people. I don't have to be in one place or the other to notice diffrences in others. I suppose that is where the saying we are all unique in our own ways comes from. That is cool you found them both to be about the same.
@ruby222 (4848)
3 May 08
1 person likes this
@Modestah (11192)
• United States
3 May 08
I have lived in the south for a few years, and the only stereotype that I experienced was being a "dern yankie" which I am told the difference between a yankie and a dern yankie is that a dern yankie doesn't leave.
1 person likes this
• United States
4 May 08
I have often heard that remark living in the south. I'm sure you have come up with a great comment after hearing such stupid things as this to shut someone up in a hurry. I know I probally would have.
@JonnyVet (57)
• United States
2 May 08
Yeah, i catch a lot of stereotypes living in south carolina... since im black everyone assumes im a gangster and walk around my city with a pistol or something. And since i date a white girl( a very pretty one) i have it a little worse. but the looks strangers give me are growing on me.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 May 08
Yeah,after a while you just start overlooking other peoples ignorance. It is none of their business who you date,you should date whomever makes you happy. The gangster thing would get old quick,it would have to. I have never experienced this as a white female and I know I probally never will. I do however have a friends in diffrent areas, friends around here say they haven't experienced that here. However the ones that live in the bigger cities have.
• United States
2 May 08
I actually just moved to the South and I know exactly what you are talking about. Before moving here, when I would mention it to someone they would automatically assume some sort of redneck or hillbilly type thing and make comments. Although it doesn't bother me because it's purely opinion but after being in the South I do see how the stereotyping is not only apart of northerners but southerners as well. Because people in the south automatically assume things as well about people from the North, West, and East!
1 person likes this
• United States
3 May 08
You are correct. I think it would be that way no matter where you moved to. I think it is probally a world wide thing that effects everyone. I use to think it was only in the United States but as I grew older and smarter I realized it was not just over here in the states.
@Kecia08 (554)
• United States
2 May 08
I was born, raised, and still live in North Georgia, and yes, we are all called "hicks" and "rednecks." I consider myself "Southern," which is my opinion is different. "Southern" is just referring to what part of the country I live in. "Redneck" refers to the way someone talks, acts, dresses, etc. I have some "rednecks" in my family, but I am not one myself, and there are others in my family that are not "redneck" either. A lot of people see my city as a "poor redneck town." When our high school's football team plays our rival (the city beside ours), it's known as the "rednecks vs. the preps". For the most part, I don't really mind it...but it can sometimes get annoying!
• United States
2 May 08
I have a few of the so called "rednecks" in my family. You learn to look over them after a while.I live in a small town with mostly poor and some middle class working families. Alot of people around here are not college educated and so people just assume the "dumb hick" thing regualary. When in fact their is alot of smart people here. My high school had about 300 students top. Our high school football games were very similiar in ways.
• United States
2 May 08
I live in Mississippi and was in a girl's home in South Carolina for 2 1/2 years and they would have what they called "redneck parties", which they always called me a redneck because I talked so country, and when they had these parties they would drink out of mason jars with handles, put freckles on their face, put tootsie rolls on their teeth to portray missing teeth, and stuff like that and it was nuts. All people in the south do not dress the same or talk the same. But they always made fun of my accent. Just because I am from the south does not mean anyhing!!!
1 person likes this
• United States
2 May 08
I never really been made fum of for my accent,but I've worked withh people my whole working life and I have had tons of complimments . People say things like " I love your accent ". I even had people draw me into long conversations just to her me talk. You can usually tell when that happens. I myself love to hear an Australian speak.
@Adelida2233 (1008)
• United States
2 May 08
I get stereotyped for all kinds of things. It used to really bother me, but now I just find the amusement in it. First of all, I live in Virgina, pretty much the center of the Civil War and having more battles in VA than any other state leads to some pretty racially motivated comments. I am blond, so anytime I do anything remotely retarded(which I will admit is fairly frequently), I hear blond jokes. Some of them are genuinely funny, but it gets really old after the first year or 2. I'm dating a cop. This has its own seperate set of jokes associated with it. You just have to look at the humor in it(Ill admit its hard to see the humor at the beginning), but if you laugh along with whoever is making the comments, they've lost their power.
• United States
2 May 08
Usually I do laugh about it,as I am pretty easygoing.I think sometimes it is the way it is said. You probally can assiociate with that. I know all about the blonde jokes as well. But now my hair is dark so I don't hear that anymore.