The Vitamin That Could Add Years to Your Life!!!

@vanities (11343)
Davao, Philippines
May 5, 2008 7:56pm CST
f there were an Olympics for antiaging nutrients, vitamin D would have a good shot at the gold medal. Here's why: Scientists recently examined how blood levels of vitamin D affect aging on a cellular level. High intake was associated with as much as 5 fewer years of chromosome aging! New Wonder Vitamin D seems to be particularly relevant to a cellular yardstick of aging called a telomere. These "end caps" on your chromosomes get shorter and shorter with age, but having high blood levels of vitamin D seems to help ensure longer telomeres. That's a good thing, because when telomeres get really short and disappear, cells stop dividing and start to die. Translation: You age and become more vulnerable to disease. Find out more about how to keep your telomeres long -- and your body young. More D Delights For years, D -- a vitamin found in food but also synthesized by your skin with a bit of sun exposure -- has been a nutritionist's delight because of its impact on bone health. Now, evidence is growing that the vitamin not only helps build bone and thwart aging but also defends against multiple sclerosis, several cancers (including these), and inflammation in the gums and . . . (whew) . . . lungs. D is definitely moving into bona fide supernutrient territory. Better Get Yours Milk remains an excellent source of vitamin D, with 100–125 international units (IU) per cupful. Not into milk? Here are a few other sun-free ways to get your fill of D: * Choose fortified foods. Food manufacturers are catching on: We want more D! Check the labels of everything -- from orange juice and bread to yogurt and pudding -- to see if they're fortified. Become an expert at reading labels with these tips. * Eat fish. The richest source of D is salmon (360 IU of vitamin D in 3.5 ounces), but tuna and sardines canned in oil are good sources, too. Check this list of low-mercury fish. * Have an egg. D is in the yolk, and although 26 IU doesn't sound like much, it all adds up. * Take a supplement. Just stay below 2000 IU per day from food and supplements combined. excerpts from:http://www.realage.com/ct/eat-smart/food-and-nutrition/tip/5768 hope this a great information for those who read this topic..
1 person likes this
3 responses
@Trace86 (5034)
• United States
6 May 08
You just have to be careful since Vit D is fat-soluble and will hang around a lot longer than say Vit C. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in very few foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. It is also produced endogenously when ultraviolet rays from sunlight strike the skin and trigger vitamin D synthesis [1-3]. Vitamin D obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements is biologically inert and must undergo two hydroxylations in the body for activation. The first occurs in the liver and converts vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], also known as calcidiol. The second occurs primarily in the kidney and forms the physiologically active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], also known as calcitriol [4]. Vitamin D is essential for promoting calcium absorption in the gut and maintaining adequate serum calcium and phosphate concentrations to enable normal mineralization of bone and prevent hypocalcemic tetany. It is also needed for bone growth and bone remodeling by osteoblasts and osteoclasts [4-6]. Without sufficient vitamin D, bones can become thin, brittle, or misshapen. Vitamin D sufficiency prevents rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults [3,7,8]. Together with calcium, vitamin D also helps protect older adults from osteoporosis. Vitamin D has other roles in human health, including modulation of neuromuscular and immune function and reduction of inflammation. Many genes encoding proteins that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are modulated in part by vitamin D Vitamin D toxicity can cause nonspecific symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, constipation, weakness, and weight loss [74]. More seriously, it can also raise blood levels of calcium, causing mental status changes such as confusion and heart rhythm abnormalities [8]. The use of supplements of both calcium (1,000 mg/day) and vitamin D (400 IU/day) by postmenopausal women was associated with a 17% increase in the risk of kidney stones over 7 years in the Women's Health Initiative [75]. Deposition of calcium and phosphate in the kidneys and other soft tissues can also be caused by excessive vitamin D levels [5]. A serum 25(OH)D concentration consistently 200 ng/mL (500 nmol/L) is considered to be potentially toxic [15]. In an animal model, concentrations =400 ng/mL (=1,000 nmol/L) were not associated with harm [16]. Excessive sun exposure does not result in vitamin D toxicity because the sustained heat on the skin is thought to photodegrade previtamin D3 and vitamin D3 as it is formed [11,30]. High intakes of dietary vitamin D are very unlikely to result in toxicity unless large amounts of cod liver oil are consumed; toxicity is more likely to occur from high intakes of supplements. Long-term intakes above the UL increase the risk of adverse health effects [5] (Table 4). Substantially larger doses administered for a short time or periodically (e.g., 50,000 IU/week for 8 weeks) do not cause toxicity. Rather, the excess is stored and used as needed to maintain normal serum 25(OH)D concentrations when vitamin D intakes or sun exposure are limited [15,76]. Several nutrition scientists recently challenged these ULs, first published in 1997 [76]. They pointed to newer clinical trials conducted in healthy adults that found no evidence of vitamin D toxicity at doses =10,000 IU/day. Although vitamin D supplements above recommended levels given in clinical trials have not shown harm, most trials were not adequately designed to assess harm [6]. Evidence is not sufficient to determine the potential risks of excess vitamin D in infants, children, and women of reproductive age.
@vanities (11343)
• Davao, Philippines
6 May 08
thanks for the further information about this kind of vitamins...i really appreciate it...
@lilaclady (28245)
• Australia
6 May 08
Isn't Vitamin D what you get from the sun, I am a firm believer these days in fish oil and I have always believed Vitamin E is a miracle thing to take. There is a lot in all these reports.
@vanities (11343)
• Davao, Philippines
6 May 08
yeah it is...its a newsletter i got from realage actually and i had given in this discussion the link of it..its what the information stated..its the first time i know that besides the sun we still can get from other sources(food)..
@tigerdragon (4297)
• Philippines
6 May 08
for someone who feels ld for the first time, this is a very good information to low down physical aging. i will be saving the link. you know, i tire easily now and my back keeps on aching. yeah, i lack some vitamins and other food supplements. it is time to get rid of my kryptonites and take in some power juice!
@vanities (11343)
• Davao, Philippines
7 May 08
likewise here especially if im overworked and ican feel the stressed in my back too..