Civics Education

United States
May 9, 2008 3:25pm CST
American Civics is no longer taught in most high schools due to tight budgets and other things being more important to public school policy makers. Do you think it should still be taught? Why or why not?
2 people like this
4 responses
• United States
9 May 08
Ethics should be taught in primary and high school. Catch them while they're young and teach them the value of living your life appreciating the rules of conduct, the rightness and wrongness of certain actions and the goodness and badness of the motives and ends of such actions. I know these things should also be taught at home but some parents are not capable of removing their biased from their teachings when it comes to their own children. I have made a few errors in this department myself and those mistakes are the hardest to rectify.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 May 08
You are right on target with that Lambchoper. Ethics is something we can never learn to well. I think you may have misread my question though. I was actually asking about Civics, how our government works and how it is structured. It is still taught in my daughter's high school, but it has become an almost year to year debate as to whether or not it will be taught. I remember thinking it was such a boring class myself, but I understand that so few students are being educated about government that in a survey of I think 500,000 high school students a huge number thought that reporters had to get governmental permission before writing a story.
• United States
9 May 08
I just found the link to the study it was 100,000 students and 51% did not realize the government could not control what is published.
• United States
9 May 08
You're right I misread your question or more accurately I think I saw what I wanted to see heheh. To answer your question about Civics I strongly feel they younger generations should be taught and be aware of their role and duty in our government. The American system of government was designed to give citizens a say in how their country is run and not educating generations of our children about this is the fast track to a dictatorship. Brings this quote to mind. "I'm the decider!" Wrong wiener we are.
2 people like this
• United States
9 May 08
Hi Sugar, I do think that American Civics/ government should be taught yet in high school. It's really difficult to get high schoolers to become decent American citizen, and to have them learn more about America, if they aren't taught it. Maybe high schools could put it in the curriculum as a part of the history class? It would fit in. I remember having it as a part of our American history class in high school, along with an American Govt. Class.
@fifileigh (3619)
• United States
10 May 08
probably because it is boring as hell. i hate civics. bored me and wasted my time. i think it should be taught as an elective for the few kids in school who actually enjoy that stuff. usually the ones that like to debate and want to be future lawyers. i dont think most teens care for that garbage.
• United States
11 May 08
Boring as hell.......waste of time.......I guess you will never vote, thank God. Most teens don't care for that garbage? Have you considered a nice dictatorship like Cuba, North Korea, Venezuela? They don't bother with things like civics since they do what they are told, ya, why bother. So you do not want to be a lawyer, can't blame you for that....Perhaps you should just drop out and take a job as an executive VP with Microsoft. Is there a big call for illiterate and uninformed hamburger flippers?
@Exertus (24)
• United States
15 May 08
Absolutely. I am deeply concerned for the long term future of our country. She has been suffering erosion from within for the last 4 decades. I have a lot of immigrant friends who became citizens. One gentlemen, born and raised in Malaysia, took the required courses and the oath and became a citizen. He is a patriot of the first order, and someone I honor deeply as an American citizen. He has a greater love for this country and his new life than anyone I have ever met. He tells me that he learned about what there was to love in our country through these classes, and that these classes led him to want to discover more. So why not our children? Are our children not aliens too? Yes. Are they born with inherent flag waving American blood?... No. And they are going to teach their children about 80% of what they learned from us, as we have only taken a portion of what our parents believed in. What's left in 4 more generations? With this in mind, I feel we need to be teaching our children in school. And while we are at it, let's get prayer, art and music back in. We need creative, faithful people - not just politically correct number crunchers. We have all but eliminated prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance in our schools to appease the few. Partly because of this. The few will become many.
• United States
15 May 08
It's so funny that you brought up immigrants who have gone on to become citizens. I too have a couple of acquaintances who have taken the classes to become citizens. They are inspiring in their passion for this great country. They are more "American" than many Americans born into their citizenship. I think this is something we have to demand of local School Boards as the authority for making curriculum decisions on subjects that are not-required for college admissions seems to fall on them. To be fair they are under pressure to meet other Federal and State requirements with limited budgets. Scores for college admissions are taken into account in determining a school's overall funding by the Feds. Students are not tested on their knowledge of their country's government since it is not considered that important by the Federal government. Scary thought!
1 person likes this