What's for duff?

@whywiki (6070)
Canada
May 15, 2008 1:59pm CST
When I was growing up my family used to always ask mom what's for duff, meaning what is for dessert? I hadn't heard the term again for 20 years until one day hubby said What's for duff? I was a little shocked. I was working on yet another day when my coworker mentioned duff. I figure it must be an Old English expression as we all have European ancestors. Is there any strange sayings that you thought only your family used and yet it was more widespread? What is your expression?
1 person likes this
3 responses
@flowerchilde (12518)
• United States
22 May 08
Imagine not hearing it for twenty years and then hearing it twice close together like that.. I grew up in New England, usa, and there's a few words I never hear except when I go home.. Like "gomey" if someone is gomey, they're clumsy.. or you would say "isn't that baby cunnin'" meaning they're cute.. that's all I can think of now, but I'm sure there's more!
@whywiki (6070)
• Canada
23 May 08
I like the word gomey I think that I will have to fit that in my vocabulary. I am always looking for new words to make popular in my circle.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 May 08
There ya go! I'll have to ask the fam, what's for duff? See how they react..
15 May 08
I am English and have never heard of this expression!! It would be interestin to find out where it is used and where it started from!!
@whywiki (6070)
• Canada
15 May 08
So much for that theory. Now I am curious how people from different parts of the world all end up with the same sayings.
@kykidd (6820)
• United States
15 May 08
Before or after dinner we were always told to "Red up the table". That basically meant just to clean it off. If it was before dinner, I guess "red" was short for Get it Ready. Not sure why it was also used after dinner to clear off the dishes.
@whywiki (6070)
• Canada
15 May 08
I have never heard of that expression. It is funny how we take sayings in our lives for granted.