I got a free dinner!

@dragon54u (31636)
United States
May 24, 2008 3:47pm CST
Invitation arrived to a free conference with dinner and its sponsored by ShopsOnline, tells me I'm going to learn how to maximize my internet learning potential. Right away, I smelled a sales pitch. Why would they go to the trouble of giving everyone a free dinner--and a handsome day planner and calculator--if they weren't selling something? The accompanying letter said they were not selling anything but I can smell a scam a mile away! What do you think? Any experience with this type of stuff? I hate to pass up a free dinner but..
3 people like this
10 responses
@jer31558 (3683)
• United States
26 May 08
I haven't ever had such to happen to me, but like you I would be skeptical. I would think that they are selling something no matter what they may say. Let us know if you decide to go and the results.
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
26 May 08
I've decided not to go. I'm not good at saying no, especially if I think I can make some money. These people are looking for people like me, in their mid-fifties with very little retirement savings--my ex didn't believe in saving and I was stupid. Anything I hear about the internet with regards to making money, I automatically assume it's a scam. Sad thing, considering how prevalent it is in our lives.
@GreenMoo (11842)
25 May 08
Sounds like they're going to try and sell you something to me! But if you can manage to hold onto your cheque book, you don't mind sitting through all the presentations and sales pitches and you read all the small print before you go, then go for it. A free dinner is a free dinner!
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
I decided not to go. I'm not good at holding onto my checkbook! I have to take extreme measures with myself to manage my money and I do pretty well except at places like that. You know, they were nice enough to feed me and the plan sounds so good....
1 person likes this
@webeishere (36353)
• United States
25 May 08
They do try to seel an exspensive program for this online earnings etc. I have seen them and a friend went to one that sounds similiar to yours. He got the meal and beverages along with a mini briefcase, notepad and calculator free at no cost. They wait till the end then comes their pitch before you get the freebies. They did give him the freebies after that though. HAPPY POSTINGS FROM GRANDPA BOB !!~
1 person likes this
@dodoguy (1297)
• Australia
25 May 08
Hi dragon54u, I got one like that not too long ago - sounded all very well organized and quite an attractive proposition, they even allowed you to invite a couple of extra friends as well as your partner. There HAS to be a high commission or profit potential in it for these people to do this sort of thing. That doesn't necessarily mean that it's a scam or even a high-pressure sales pitch (although it might be). But for whatever reason, they've settled on this marketing strategy to try to recruit clients for whatever it is that they're flogging. One question in the back of my mind is - what demographic information did they use to pull MY name out of the hat? Is it completely random, or are they targeting their prospective guests by using some financial records or other? Anyway, it sounded nice, but I gave it a miss. A meal in a restaurant setting might sound attractive, but I'd rather enjoy it freely than conditionally.
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
This one would be in the downtown hotel that's a bit upscale, a good selling point. I figure they picked me because I'm 54 and they figure I'm probably worried about retiring so they can take advantage of that fear to sell whatever they're selling!
@dodoguy (1297)
• Australia
25 May 08
Also a good idea to take someone else along for moral support if you need it...
@dmillman (2273)
• United States
25 May 08
I keep getting those in the mail, but can never seem to find someone to go with me, and I'd rather not go alone. Some day, someone will be able to go with me and I'll be able to see what it's all about!
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
I always go everywhere by myself, even when I was married my husband didn't want to go anywhere. Go ahead and be brave, go places by yourself! People don't think it's strange, don't worry. It's fun and you don't have to worry about what someone else wants, you can do what you please when you want to do it!
1 person likes this
@dmillman (2273)
• United States
26 May 08
It's funny you should say that. After I hit send on the response, I thought, "I should just go on my own, and that way if it's stupid I've only ruined my time and not someone else's." I think I'll give it a try the next time I'm invited. (Watch, now that I've decided to finally go, I won't be invited!)
@Cyrics (85)
• Philippines
25 May 08
Try to go and see for yourself. Just make sure to tell yourself that you are not going to buy or sign up for anything you don't like. Who knows, you might like their sales pitch and the food maybe prepared well.
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
I already threw the tickets in the trash. I'm a sucker for a sales pitch so it was an act of self-defense!
@callarse1 (4793)
• United States
25 May 08
Yes, I get those from time to time. I've never gone to those meetings because they usually are high pressured. They make you sit through an hour or more presentation and try to get you to join. They want to argue about it and such. Of course if you don't mind arguing with them and don't mind siting through the presentation they have to give you the certificate even if you buy nothing..so it's really up to you on your decision. I wouldn't go to the meeting because I don't want to buy their stuff and I don't want to keep arguing, right? Pablo
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
You're right but I'm not good at saying "no". That's why I usually avoid sales pitches! I know my limitations!
@yoyo1198 (3643)
• United States
24 May 08
Yup...you betcha they're selling something. And it sounds like it's gonna be one of those big-buck$ deals. They wouldn't be giving away things like that for nothing. They obviously think they're going to reap a big profit. I'd just stay away if it were me. I accepted an invitation to a promotional dinner once that was given by an investment firm under the ruse of them giving out free advice for investment planning. The dinner was held in a well-known restaurant. Turned out that the food was horrible as it was prepared in quantity and tasted like institutional food. Then we had to sit there through their speil. The free advice turned out to be a short one-on-one session with one of their 'planners' and a request to hire them long term. I told myself then that I'd never again accept an invitation to one of those things.
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
25 May 08
You and I are prime targets for creeps like this, they better watch out cos we're onto them!
• India
24 May 08
Usually such kinds of things are always a scam to make their sales go up. They tend to make you go there and listen to their stuff and then make an offer. But since they mentioned that they are not selling anything, I think it would be good if you just gave it a try. Or give the invitation to another person who would like to do this.. bourne
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
24 May 08
The tickets are in my name, they're striving to make it very personal which further leads me to believe in sales hijinks!
@Fishmomma (11452)
• United States
28 May 08
I wouldn't go and throw them out. They are sales pitches and my grocery bill isn't high enough to make me spend hours at one of these events. I'm aware that some people do get out of these conferences fast, but none of my friends have been that lucky.