Ugh!! This puppy!

@emma412 (1156)
United States
May 27, 2008 1:37pm CST
So we adopted a german shephard puppy a few months ago. He is so sweet and I love him to death except for one thing... he pees all the time!! If he gets excited, he pees. If he gets scared, he pees. Every time I come home and walk in the front door he starts jumping around peeing all over the place. He is a puppy and does many things he's not supposed to, so I have to yell at him every once and a while. Every time I do, he pees on the floor. Help!! I am hoping he will grow out of it as he gets bigger and so does his bladder but I'm so afraid he won't. I think the pee will drive me to insanity if he is always going to be like this. Anybody have any suggestions? Or advice? Have you been through it? How did you cope? Talk to me!
3 people like this
13 responses
• Belgium
27 May 08
In the beginning our dog also kept peeing in the house.. One solution i can suggest: if he pees, then rub his nose through the pee. Make sure you do it quite rough so he knows he's getting punished and recognises the smell (not too rough though :) ) If he pees outside, then give him a reward. Normally, this should work after a couple of weeks. Ow, also give him the chance to pee outside because if he can't leave the house he's got no other choice to pee in the house of course.. so let him out regularly.
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
He's not going to the bathroom in the house. He is piddling when he is excited or scared. He goes to the bathroom outside whenever I take him.
1 person likes this
@spalladino (17927)
• United States
27 May 08
Congrats on the puppy...welcome to peeland. Young dogs will pee when excited or scared so take precautions and take him out to pee as often as possible. He should grow out of this. I've raised several puppies and they grew out of it and were eventually house broken. The only suggestion I can offer aside from keeping him confined when you're not home, is to try to keep him as calm as possible so that he doesn't have these accidents and be sure to praise him a lot when he pees where he's supposed to. And make sure he doesn't have to pee during play time, which is as important for a puppy as it is for a child. Good luck!!
2 people like this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
I am glad to hear yours have grown out if it! I have a "don't talk to the puppy" rule whenever we get home from somewhere. We just bee line to the back door and let him out. He has the house training down it's just the uncontrollable piddles when he's excited or scared that he's doing. I will wait for him to grow out of it.
1 person likes this
@Loverbear (4929)
• United States
28 May 08
Congratulations on the puppy! They are so much fun and so willing to please and protect. First, when he pees in the house, don't rub his nose in it! How would you like to have your nose rubbed in your pee? Especially with a proud breed such as a German Shepard. Puppies are very submissive. He will tend to pee when frightened (I always say that they feel if they are going to die they're not taking the pee with them! LOL) or excited or when you yell at him. In a couple of months, when his bladder muscles get stronger, he will stop peeing all over. He is still a baby. Think of him as a human baby, we wouldn't expect a 4 month old baby to be fully potty trained yet would we? It's the same with a pet, yet we are figuring that they should be totally house trained at a few months old. Shoot, even my older dogs have accidents in the house. A couple of hints; first when you come home, try letting him greet you outside the front door. At least the pee will be easier to clean up. Focus on his joy at seeing you after your being gone forever (8 to 10 hours is an eternity in a puppy's life...and at this stage things have changed so much between his being born, weaned, and then changing homes in such a short period of time it is understandable that he is so excited that you came home to him. Right now you are his only constant, and he depends on you for everything!)I know that it is an annoyance that when you come home and are tired you have to clean up puppy pee, but you are building a friendship that will last for years and this stage will only last a short time. Secondly, when he is frightened, talk to him softly and reassure him that it's okay. Again, his peeing at being frightened is natural and he will grow out of it. When you were a small child and were frightened your parents (I hope they did this) would talk softly and reassuringly to you about what frightened you...right down to chasing the monsters out from under the bed! Don't yell at the dog. It scares the crap out of them. I have found that it is just as effective to speak sternly to them rather than yelling at them. For some reason dogs react like humans when you yell at them. They get to the point of tuning the yeller out. Also, small children get frightened at being yelled at, and a small puppy is similar to a small child. Also, if you yell at the puppy too much you will create a shy dog who will continue to have the pee problem. I guess what it amounts to in the short run is to equate your puppy as a baby, and deal with him like you would with a human baby and child. You wouldn't rub your child's nose in his pee, you don't expect them to be house trained totally at a very young age, and you wouldn't yell at your baby and scare the crap out of them needlessly. Your puppy will grow out of the constant peeing stage when his bladder muscles and his bladder grow up a little more. I assure you that this will pass.
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
29 May 08
Thank you for all the great information. It all backs up my feelings on the issue, and I will keep my patience with him until he grows out of it. Thanks for your response.
@Loverbear (4929)
• United States
29 May 08
I acquired two mini Dachshunds from a breeder. They are older adults and had never been in the house. The biggest challenge is to house break them!!! Fortunately I have a carpet cleaner because they don't always remember to ask to go out. I have learned a valuable lesson in both patience and understanding. I was given the most wonderful gift by the breeder, as I had to put my Rottweiller down four days before Christmas. My oldest grand daughter tormented the dog to the point that he couldn't take anymore and bit her. My daughter went ballistic and insisted that he be killed immediately...which I gave in and took him in and had it done...my heart is still broken over that because Hannibal had never offered to bite anyone and was great with children, babies and small animals. The other thing that killed me over it was her mother in law has a malteze that has bitten everyone at least once, including me and a neighbor in her apartment complex. You can't touch the dog without it snapping at you-yet my daughter has never demanded that her mother in law kill her dog. Anyhow, the breeder gave me the pair as a gift to help me with the pain. (When I first went to see her I told her the whole story. She cried for my loss that night and called me back to the kennel-this pair was in the exercise pen with bows around their necks! What a wonderful gift!!!) Anyhow, the lesson of patience and understanding has been extreme with the pair, but the joy and love they give me out weighs their problem with peeing in the house. They have gotten better about asking to go out but they still have accidents--and it doesn't bother me like it would have a couple of years ago. I just get out the portable carpet cleaner and clean the spot. I value the companionship and love of the pair more than I worry about the carpet (I'm going to replace it at the end of the year anyway.) Just love the daylights out of that puppy it's a wonderful gift and companion.
• United States
28 May 08
Much of what the others have said is good. Make sure you don't greet him in an excited way when you come in the door. It can be hard but it really helps to keep him calm. It sounds like he is submission peeing. As soon as you get in, bring him out to potty. In fact, you might want to have a leash ready and let him come to the door to meet you, if he's loose in the house and take him out right away. Frequent potty runs may help. I'm not sure how to handle submissive peeing. Another thing I would check out, though, is a physical problem. You might want to get him checked for a urinary tract infection. If he has one, he can't control it. Thanks for adopting a puppy that needed a home. I have 2 rescues and they're great!
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Oh yeah, we will always go for the shelter dogs. He is our second. Our first one was abused, starved and left alone in apartment for a month before anyone found her. We spent a lot of time working with her and she is just the sweetest, most loving dog for it. I'm hoping taking him directly out will stop the problem. I just need to make sure to take him out before I answer the front door!
@ZephyrSun (7387)
• United States
28 May 08
I don't have an answer for you but I can tell you that my lab still pees when he is scared or excited. We got him when he was a year old so I am not sure if he has done this forever or not, but I know enough now to walk away if he rolls over!
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Haha! Good luck to you too.
@mimico (3619)
• Philippines
28 May 08
Aww! I find your misfortune quite entertaining actually no offense. Anyway, we've had puppies before but they didn't have peeing problems, so I'm not sure how to go about it. My dog-lover instinct tells me to just let the dog be until he/she grows up. If your puppy doesn't outgrow the bad habit, then you might want to hire a trainer for just a day. Doggie diapers might also work. :) Good luck!
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
I'm glad someone can make something of my situation! I think I am resigned to hoping he will grow out of it. My best friend told me to just get rid of him. I was so shocked! I would never get rid of him over peeing issues. We've got a vet appointment next week so we'll see if his vet can suggest anything.
• Indonesia
28 May 08
Well,,all can i say is lucky next time you get a dog,, tx
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Well... it will be quite some time until that happens. We have two and that's the most we want.
• United States
28 May 08
You need to realize he is just a toddler. As he gets older he will gain more control but you might consider crate training. Most dogs will not go in a crate but be prepared to rush him out the door once he is out of the crate even if for just a few minutes. It also makes house breaking go much easier because he will start teething soon an and if you are gone and he is loose the furniture becomes fair game along with shoes, clothing, and bedding.
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll be sure to use his crate 100% of the time now and see if it works.
• China
28 May 08
Maybe I am lucky that I don't have experience as you suffered because I always keep a big one who has been trained well!
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
I'm jealous!
@lingli_78 (12852)
• Australia
27 May 08
i have a puppy before and it pees all the time as well... we just can't help it... i think it is their nature to pee and you just have to teach him to pee in the specified place inside the house or outside the house... my mum teach the puppy to pee in the bathroom and evertime she pees somewhere else, she will be punished by confining her in the cage for some times... when she pees in the bathroom, she gets a reward like a pat, a rub on her head or a treat... as time goes by, she learns and she just pee in the bathroom... so it is easier for us to clean it... good luck and have a nice day...
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Thank you for your response! I will hold out on the thought that it's just a stage!
@manalove (65)
27 May 08
I got my german shephard in December and he just got out of the peeing and pooping all ove the place stage . So yeah I think yours will grow out of it. Now just waiting for the chewing stage to stop.
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
Ha! Our first dog still chews stuff and we've had for three years! So, I'm not counting on that one anytime soon.
@KarenO52 (2951)
• United States
27 May 08
I would suggest crate training, to help ensure that he's getting the idea of housebreaking. Also, take him out immediately when you get home. He should grow out of the excited peeing, but if he doesn't, I would have him checked out with the vet to rule out any possible physical problem. My daughter has a new puppy, and she bought a kind of movable indoor fence that she paid about 75 dollars for. She can easily move it around to keep the puppy in areas where her accidents will not ruin the flooring. She said it was worth every penny.
1 person likes this
@emma412 (1156)
• United States
28 May 08
He is in a crate and when I come home he sees me and pees all over the crate. Ugh! He has the housebreaking down it's just the excited and scared peeing that he is doing in the house.
@v1ctr0 (82)
• Belgium
27 May 08
Lol nice puppy but if you think that's weird check this creepy dog. Just go to youtube and search for "the most amazing dog" If i would run into that at night i'd be so bloody scared.