Today kicks off International Clothesline Week - do your part to be green!!!!

United States
June 7, 2008 6:54am CST
Before there was ever such a thing as International Clothesline Week, do you remember as a kid seeing your mother hang the clothes on the clothesline and a few hours later helping her to take them down and smelling the freshness of each piece? This brings back so many memories for me!!!! I'm glad my mom did this because she taught me that nothing beats the smell of fresh laundry, especially when you are laying in bed!!!!I don't do this as much in the winter because I don't like frozen clothes, but I am investing in indoor racks so I can put them in my sunroon this year. Now many people ONLY use dryers ... lots of dryers!Over 75% of our households have a clothes dryer drawing huge amounts of energy! If every household participated for even one day it would save us a huge amount of energy which translates into a huge dollar savings. More importantly that translates into less charcoal pollutants and thus less health consequences associated with coal driven electricity. As a global community, if we could all hang our clothes to dry, it will mean healthier mentalities, healthier relationships and a healthier earth. And that's just one day; how about a week, a year, a lifetime??For at least one week, International Clothesline Week encourages the public to hang clothes to dry instead of using their electric or gas dryer. If you can, make it a lifetime practice. Like a new years resolution make it the beginning of a new “healthy” habit. If you already do hang your clothes, commit to encouraging at least one other person, IN THE WORLD, to hang their clothes and/or commit to doing something else for the environment. Clothesline: In lieu of having a traditional clothesline (you know, the one with two pulleys, one on each end) you could create an indoor clothesline installation, temporarily using a piece of rope and tie it between two solid structures. Where to hang your clothes: OUTSIDE on a clothesline would be best and you can also use: a clothes rack, a chair, your back porch, your unused treadmill, etc. I invested in a clothestree from Lowes that is easily put into the ground, with a little concrete and then we take it down when we are not using it. The Mission is to have all humans of this earth collectively save energy by hanging clothes to dry as often as possible for the environment. Things to consider when hanging clothes to dry:saves up to 10% of residential energy; Running a dryer 20 hours a month will cost you on average 100 kilowatt hours. A clothesline's operating costs are zero!! less need for nuclear energy or coal energy less emissions which saves our health, literally less deaths and saves the earth using solar and wind power - free clothes smell better (like sun and air) clothes feel better clothes will last much longer (less wear and tear from the heat and tumbling of the dryer) clothes don't wrinkle – no need to use electric iron, another savings no need to wait for the dryer to finish don't have to empty the lint tray improve relationships; working together for the greater good builds friendships and love… (my girls often help me and this is when we have our little "girl" talks!can be therapeutic – the time it takes to hang the clothes can be time of reflection of you, family, earth, etc. burn calories - because you're exercising many muscles you burn about 45 calories every 15 minutes.
3 people like this
5 responses
@bfarrier1 (2082)
• United States
8 Jun 08
I remember my mom doing this when I was a little girl she also had a wringer washer but that was long ago.I don't think I can do without my dryer I am a busy lady and I often only do laundry once a week its just myself and my husband so I don't have to do laundry everyday and I sure am glad about that.for some reason laundry is just one chore I cant stand.well good luck on your mission and I hope you have huge sucess.Have a great night.
2 people like this
• United States
8 Jun 08
Luckily I only have to do laudry maybe twice a week. Hopefully now that it is summer and the girls will be living in their bathing suits, I can get away with doing it only once a week. Thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
@SViswan (12072)
• India
7 Jun 08
Well, this is a reality in India and not many people use a dryer (not yet). Though washing machines are getting popular...not everyone has them and most people wash the clothes the traditional way or give it to laundry people (not the kind where they dry clean your clothes...but the kind where a person takes it to the river to wash them). And I have to admit that hanging the clothes out was bonding time for my older son and me.
2 people like this
• United States
8 Jun 08
Thanks for sharing! We, Americans, take a lot of our appliances for granted.
1 person likes this
@Ldyjarhead (10157)
• United States
8 Jun 08
I so wish I did have a clothesline, or a place to put one. We are renting a very small house here and even though the yard is good sized, there is absolutely no place to put something like that where it wouldn't be under a tree (NOT a good idea!). I don't have a place for a drying rack either. This place is so small we don't even have room to walk around each other and even a small clothes rack wouldn't work. The bathroom is so small that if you are sitting on the commode, your knee is less than an inch away from the sink, and you can touch the tub with one hand and the door with another! I do my best to limit my laundry, and it's not bad since it's just Tom and I. I do conserve as much as I can in other ways too.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jun 08
Could you put a drying rack right outside your door? I use to hate when I lived in that I didn't have a balcony.
@Ldyjarhead (10157)
• United States
8 Jun 08
Nope. The back door has a tiny little porch, just big enough for one chair and that's where my husband smokes. Beyond that is under a huge tree. The front is close to the road, and the porch is only wide enough to walk up to the door and that's it.
8 Jun 08
My wife is from the Philippines and she always hangs her clothes outside and sometimes inside depending on the weather. We have a washer and dryer and use the dryer when we have to but she always hangs the majority of the clothes up as this is the way she grew up in the Philippines. I too was raised on a farm in Michigan and for years my mother did not have a dryer and hung the clothes on the clothesline and yes..the sheets always smelled good on laundry day. Sadly too many people think this is too much work or they think a clothesline is ugly. Once we were looking to buy a new home and we asked about putting up a clothesline and the people were aghast and said they "never" seen anyone doing this in "their" subdivision..as they said this..we were in the patio area and I said what about those people there? The couple looked and their was a clothesline two houses down in the back yeard full of clothes.."oh..we never seen THAT before!" but I did not argue. People believe don't see what they don't want to see. Yes, I agree 100%..and also my wife plants a small garden of vegetables..this helps everyone too..I can see the victory gardens coming back and canning fruit and vegetables as the price of food goes up..
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jun 08
I hear you about the neighborhoods. I bet some Home Association probably don't allow it. LOL I have a friend who lived in NY growing up and she never heard of hanging laundry outside. Too funny. Then I was talking to a friend today and she wants her husband to put a line up for the towels from the pool. I then said oh you could hang out more stuff to dry, her response was that she didn't have time to do it. Yes, you do. You just make time. LOL I usually do a load in the morning, hand it out and by the time I am home in the afternoon it is dry. I hung up a load of jeans today and since it was near 100 degrees they were dry in 90 minutes. We also have a garden and are growing more of our own veggies. What we don't grow we will visit a farmer's market to get the rest. Thanks for the response.
@stephcjh (32328)
• United States
7 Jun 08
I hope alot of people can participate in this. I do not have a clothes line to hang my clothes out on. I just have my dryer to dry them with. Maybe I can just skip a day without using my washer and dryer. That should help alot. I don't like the way the outdoors makes my clothes smell. It is very dry and dusty here also. I just will not use my dryer today or my washer.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jun 08
I don't blame you if your environment is not good for trying clothes, I would stick to the dryer also. Thanks for the response.