Alternative fuel source

@lucy02 (5017)
United States
June 10, 2008 5:21pm CST
I was watching the news last night and they were talking about using kudzu for fuel. I don't know how many of you are familiar with kudzu but it grows rampant around here. Its wild vines that grow and completely take over an area and is very hard to kill. In fact they have been trying new products for kudzu control around here. Now we find out it can be used to make fuel. Have any of you heard about this? Your thoughts?
2 people like this
6 responses
• United States
10 Jun 08
We do not have that plant in California but I have seen pictures of it. If it is true what a great problem it would solve.
1 person likes this
@lucy02 (5017)
• United States
10 Jun 08
I didn't think it was common in California. That's where my husband is from and I've never seen it on my trips there. I think we have enough for everybody.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Jun 08
You are right you do have enough there for everybody.
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
12 Jun 08
I see the kudzu all over the place. It just takes over and kills and vegetation under it. I can see that it would makes a good fuel source. But since it grows all over the woods the problem would be in harvesting it. Them there would have to be plants built to convert it. An ethanol plant cost $60 million to build. I just read that there are now 15 ethanol plant in the state of Iowa.
1 person likes this
@lucy02 (5017)
• United States
12 Jun 08
It grows along the sides of the roads here as you said it takes over everything. I hope this works out.
@twallace (2675)
• United States
11 Jun 08
If they could have gotten this out at least 2 or 3 years ago it would be just perfect for the high gas prices. Right now i know that the price of gas is going sky high and right now they are really not using any of the other alternatives other than the cars i think. But hopefully it will kick in soon to ease the high prices. Have a nice one.
@lucy02 (5017)
• United States
11 Jun 08
Yes and I think Rachel nailed the reason on the head. The oil companies have politicians in their pocket.
@ravinskye (8242)
• United States
10 Jun 08
i've never heard of it. if it can be used that would be great. we are a family of 5 and things are getting strapped for us. with gas being as much as it is we can't really go anywhere this summer. it will be a big help.
1 person likes this
@lucy02 (5017)
• United States
10 Jun 08
Yes it would be a big help. I read that it is indigenous to China and Japan. They have been making use of it though where we haven't. They use it in medicine, food, etc. and keep it under control.
@ShepherdSpy (8562)
• Omagh, Northern Ireland
20 Jul 08
It sounds like a better idea to make use of a widely available fast growing,wild,non food pest plant to create some form of biofuel,as opposed to creating havoc by working with the corn crop and increasing it's price to those People who rely on it as a staple foodstuff...the only problem would be harvesting the stuff,as it seems to thrive on anything OTHER than Managed land!
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
20 Jul 08
I know you can turn any plant into fuel. Fuel is a generic term so I will assume you are referring to fuel as gasoline. Lets face it logs can be the fuel for a fire. I know of some plants they are considering like corn. Corn is not the way. It will increase the cost of everything and cause people to starve. It is not wise to convert food crops into gasoline unless you create new growing areas specifically designated for corn. However kudzu is another story. There is a valley where I live that is covered with it. It is actually very pretty when it blooms. Everything is covered in the valley. 50 foot trees are even covered. The valley looks like something out of Jurassic Park. It grows very fast. As a matter of fact it can grow up to 30 cm or about a foot per day. They would have to make create a growing area where it could easily be harvested. You wouldn't want to let this invasive plant get loose. It will cover everything it can reach. Do you have any idea if it is efficient? As in how much energy it takes to covert it to fuel versus other plants.