Do we need a global language, to go along with a global economy?

United States
June 20, 2008 11:33am CST
With all the talk of having a global economy, should we consider having a global language? I know in certain regions of the United States, Spanish is spoken more frequently than English. How would we go about determining a set monetary unit, and a language? Who would be in charge of selecting? Do you see this as a possibility in the future?
1 person likes this
4 responses
@tarachand (3895)
• India
22 Jun 08
I am from India where we have a multitude of local languages. I think that English is fine as an international language to go along with the global economy, considering the fact that most of the literature and content, even the computer and the internet, contains more of English than any other language. A lot of the information, commerce, etc., are available in and carried out in that language. Also, when I travel abroad, as well as in many parts of rural and interior India, I find in most cases that English is the common denominator, however badly spoken or understood. As far as a set monetary unit is concerned, I think most international deals are done in US dollars, at least deals done in India with most countries, unless there is a specific clause that calls for dealing in the local or some other internationally popular currency such as the Euro or British pound sterling. I personally favor the US dollar as the common monetary unit.
• United States
22 Jun 08
Right now, the US dollar is so weak against many other currencies; it seems that crude oil from OPEC is based off the US dollar. There is a different in American English and British English, and that's part of the problem we face. I think it would be difficult to establish a global language since there are so many cultures involved, but it could be rather intriguing. I just don't see it happening for another few hundred years. I'm glad to see you're back--hope things have been going well for you and thanks for sharing!
@tarachand (3895)
• India
22 Jun 08
Thanks for the warm welcome, things have been good, I trust with you too. The aim of a language is communication - two humans must understand each other. I think English is such a language that is understood by most peoples on this globe. The differences in the language across different geographies is bound to be there. The only way to bring complete commonality would be have a common education curriculum across the globe, right from pre-school till post graduation, I don't think that is possible even over a few centuries. I think it is the differences that bring about creativity and are a must. A currency is a medium of exchange. It is the ease of exchange of that currency with other currencies, as well as its acceptance in major markets that is important, not its rate of exchange. If we were to fix a common currency, and allow for market forces to determine the value of other currencies with respect to it, all that we would be doing is replacing the dollar with the new common currency. That would require a lot of doing and could cause a lot of havoc in the markets globally during the initial stages.
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@Margajoe (4718)
• Germany
20 Jun 08
Hi, No I do not see this as a possibility. Though I wish we could all just speak one language. In the last year I have moved to Berlin. I am learning to speak German. When I was 14 years old, we moved to Holland. There I had to learn to speak Dutch. I was born in Canada, so my first language is English. I learned a little French and Latin at school But, when I heard that the French never speak English, I was offended. Okay I was only young. But, still the people all want there own language to be nr. one. This would bring war, trying to find the right language to speak. So, unfortunately I do not see this as a possibility. It would bring too many problems. Take care, Margajoe
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• United States
20 Jun 08
Wow, you could be our global ambassador! I think it would be too difficult, since so much of the world is unique, and we need to preserve that! I enjoy hearing different cultures speaking, although it's frustrating when they're trying to speak English and I just can't understand it! I agree with you--it would be nice (but then we'd all want our native language!) but just way too difficult! Thanks for sharing your story!
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@Margajoe (4718)
• Germany
21 Jun 08
Hi, Your Welcome, And thank-you too. Take care, have a nice day. Margajoe
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• Indonesia
20 Jun 08
I think english is a global language, it's used in most countries and taught in almost every school (at least in my city). Every job listing here put english as the necessary language.
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• United States
21 Jun 08
That's what it was supposed to be, 20 years ago, but it's changed to Spanish. It's the fastest growing segment here in the US; last I knew, English was the official language! English is probably listed as a requirement since most of our jobs are being exported.
@WATARIKENJI (1534)
• Philippines
20 Jun 08
I think its not necessary. The chinese transact in their own language but they are a global player.
• United States
20 Jun 08
In the United States, we primarily transact in our own language, but we've had a number of outside issues here because of our blind faith that everyone's going to do what we want. In the last year, we've had many jobs exported to India, bad pet food and lead-based toys from China, as well as our failing economy. You can go into a home improvement store here (Home Depot) and they have everything in EIGHT languages--and of course, English is the smallest. Last I heard, our national language here in the United States IS English. I don't think that we'll need one, except for basic commands.