Why did Islam become a protected religion

@gewcew23 (8011)
United States
June 25, 2008 8:41am CST
My sin I dared to call the terrorist over in Iraq Muslim. My logic was they call themselves Muslim they must be Muslim. What happen basicly everyone came down on me. If I had started a discussion about abortion clinic bombers being Christian terrorist everyone would have agreed with me. If I had called the IRA Catholic terrorist everyone would have agreed with me. Call the people that blow themselves up in a crowed shopping center Islamic terrorist and I am a hate mongrel. So using my logic and being able to put two and two together I assume that Islam is a protect religion. Meaning that no one can say anything negative about these religion. My only question is why?
7 people like this
17 responses
• United States
25 Jun 08
Well, I am not one? But all Islamists are not fundamentalissts, nor do they believe in terrorism. It is the religion of these peaceful Islamists that happens to have protection. Like Christians, Hindus, Bhuddists, Jews, etc..they believe in God and would not harm. It is the fundamentalists of ALL religions that cause the harm. But all cannot be punished for the actions of those who have flawed thinking and would cause harm.
3 people like this
• United States
25 Jun 08
Muslims are not going to like the answer to your question, but I can tell you why Islam became a protected religion. To explain, I need to make an analogy. So, I will seem off track for a bit. You know how it is tolerated for blacks to say and do racist things that whites can't do? Like have an organization called the National Association for the Advancement of Black People? Believe it or not there was a National Association for the Advancement of White People for awhile. It was laughed out of existence. Blacks can call whites 'honkey' and worse? Whites better be completely PC. Why are things this way? There is an obvious reason blacks can do these racists things like support an organization for the advancement of their race and call other races names. It is not often spoken, but here it is. This tolerated racist behavior of blacks is a form of condenscion. You can only condensend to inferiors. While in word, it said over and over blacks are equal, in deed, blacks are subtly being put in their place everytime their racist behavior is tolerated. Blacks are not equal until held to the same standard. Now, back to Islam. How did Islam become a 'protected religion'? Much the same way the racism of blacks became 'protected'. Islam is being condescended to with the 'kid glove treatment'. The US media claims Islam is equal and entitled to the same treatment as other religions, but with the special treatment given Islam, the media is proving they believe Islam inferior. Also, don't forget that mainline journalists are fairly well known and members of the Religion of Peace just might hunt them down and kill the journalists after some Mullah issues a fatwah. Hope this helps.
2 people like this
• United States
25 Jun 08
I kinda have to disagree with this. IT has more to do with who has the "power over" versus who is subjugated. And its also the same as "in group" vs "out group" psychology, which has been studied extensively. When someone who "has power over" others, flexes that power by creating establishments that exclude others, that is seen as racist or bigoted, because it is a systemic way of excluding or denying advancement to the class of individuals who have been subjugated. When the class of individuals who have been subjugated create establishments to help support people in their own situation, it is seen as building themselves up to the level of those who previously subjugated them. When the group that has power continually creates a network that systemically excludes the "other" they continue to keep and hoarde the power for themselves. When the the group that does not have power bands together to help each other up, somehow people attack that as being somehow wrong. "why can't the whites do that?" But they don't see that whites have been doing that all along. Don't get me wrong, sometimes/often what happens is when the subjugated group becomes the group in power, they start committing the same "power over" behaviors as their previous oppressors. It's been observed time and time again in social experiments, case studies, etc. I have a friend of mine who moved into a golf course community. They were very excited about joining the community ... when they went to join the country club, they were told there was a very long waiting list, at least 6 months to a year. A month later, a neighbor who had just moved in informed them that he'd just joined the country club and was wondering if they had yet. Waiting list? No, there was no waiting list? Of course they hadn't joined the country club. Their last name was Cohen. Bigotry and prejudice is alive and well. Against muslims, against jews, against blacks, etc. Yet when these groups band together to support each other and create support networks, those networks are attacked as racist, in what seems to be some sort of unconscious effort to continue to subjugate those people. Why is it that a lot of white people in the US don't realize that they've had generations of privilege. My grandparents and great grandparents do not have a history of being subjugated to others, of being denied the right to seek out a livelihood on their own. They don't have a history of being subjugated to others. My family is very independent. We have great stories to tell. But when you have a person whose family stories include subjugation, and whose average family education level was not equivalent to mine, then no, they don't have the exact same opportunities as me. yes, there are those who rise above, those who DID get the opportunities "only in america" - but the fact remains that we have a systemic problem of subjugating others that are different than us, whether that difference is racial, ethnic, religious, etc. It is a human trait, but it is what leads to so much violence and treating each other so wrongly. Okay, I'm just rambling now ... I need to stop. Maybe I'll make sense after I've had my caffeine for the day, lol. ~ Lissa Valerian
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jun 08
lissavalerian, I must not have explained myself very well or I do not understand what you are saying. I do not see that your position disagrees with mine. I see what you are saying more as a different perspective on the same phenomona.
2 people like this
• United States
25 Jun 08
"When the class of individuals who have been subjugated create establishments to help support people in their own situation, it is seen as building themselves up to the level of those who previously subjugated them." Do you not understand that anyone who allows others to subjugate them are inherently inferior? Furthermore, that allowing the formly subjugated to behave in ways inappropiate for the previous subjugators is another way for the subjugators to continue to subtly assert their superiority? That's all I'm saying. I don't believe it contradicts what you are saying.
2 people like this
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
25 Jun 08
Because these people know that Islam does not stand up to hard scrutiny and it is a common defensive action to lash out when your lies are in danger of being exposed. I have read enough about Islam to know what it is about, and what it really stands for, and anyone that tries to claim Islam is a religion of peace is flat out lying.
2 people like this
• United States
28 Jun 08
Lol, did you see #12 below you?
• United States
28 Jun 08
How can you argue with such a logically and well presented statement such as that? It must be the KoolAid.
• United States
3 Jul 08
@urbandekay (18312)
25 Jun 08
Clearly Islam is not strong enough to stand on its own two feet and needs protection! all the best urban
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jul 08
LOL... Good one! But still it is true.
@ClarusVisum (2163)
• United States
25 Jun 08
I'm guessing what you actually did was equate "Muslim" with terrorist/fundamentalist, which is just as unfair as characterizing all Christians as being like the Phelps family.
2 people like this
@jimbomuso (950)
25 Jun 08
Hi gewcew! the are a few different types of Muslim, like Judaism has orthodox Jew's. The basic tennet of Islam is that it can not be made fun of, questioned, or challenged, which is why it inspires such fanatascismin the extreme groups.I wouldn't take it personally, innocent words cause bad reactions all the time.I think you could have stated that you don't feel this way about all Muslims. I personally beleive that religions should be challenged and important questions asked of them.
2 people like this
@jimbomuso (950)
26 Jun 08
HI again gewcew!! Phew.... this post quickly become a minefield!!! I've had time to think about this a bit more.. remember Salman Rushdie.. or the cartoon picture of trying to depict God. I personally think any religion that incourages violence is not valid to me. every well thought out argument defending Islam as a truly beautiful religion is completely destroyed when held up against its own willingness for violence. Western and Eastern Media are creating an enviroment of intolerance that's just festering away and is actually stopping serious debate.One thing I would advise in these discussions if you dont know how to phrase the question, explain it and where your coming from, and with a little luck we wont get branded as biggots!
1 person likes this
27 Jun 08
After looking at some of the profiles in this discusion I've drawn the conclusion that I need to state where I stand. It is every persons right to pursue their own spiritual fuffilment whether it be through Vishnu,Yahweh,Allah(pbuh). I would never diminish or ridicule someone's beliefs through spoken word or deed. It is notok to call someones beliefs 'nonsense'. If I allow myself to develop an 'us and them' mentality I become no better than the people who inspire religious hatred and intolerance!the bottom line.. People have been killing each other for hundreds of thousands of years ... not much is going to change unless we challenge our own perceptions and learn to understand each other.
• South Africa
29 Jun 08
I would say we must actually learn to understand ourselves first before posing questions and submitting answers.All the way with you JIMBOMUSO(786)
• United States
25 Jun 08
I did not come down on you. I never meant to. I was not angry with your discussion at all, and as I said my husband is a Muslim. I have no problem with them being called Muslim terrorists. People who are Muslim may or may not have a problem with it. They do take their ideas from the Koran, but they distort it. Thus, some people might think if it is not Koran as it is...than it is not the Koran at all. Same with Christians. When "Christian" blows up an abortion clinic, some will think that person cannot be a Christian...so don't call him or her a Christian. Others will say he takes his beliefs from the Bible and distorts it so it is ok to call that person a Christian Extremist. I have no problem with Muslims who blow up buildings being labeled Muslim Extremist or terrorist, as long as all Muslims are not seen as terrorists. Same with Christians. By putting the discriptive word Muslim before extremist, you identify certain aspects of the person. However, Christianity is taking beating in ways that Islam is not. Christians are suffering for it. The liberals cannot see this. However, Muslims are being dealt with differently by INS, so many are not protected. I think Islam seems protected because Christianity is taking a horrible beating we are getting our rights taking away from us by the minute.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jun 08
Well, you dated a Muslim, and I am married to one. I see what my husband goes through. Unfortunately, you are unaware of what Christians go through because you choose to turn the other check. Do some research. But you are not interested in really knowing, are you? You also forgot to add whites to your list of people suffering. My husband was beaten up by two men because they thought he was white....the young black woman who helped him told him so.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Jun 08
I think violence for violence sake is abhorent. For someone to attack your husband (or anyone) for their perceived race, religion, ethnicity, etc., is apalling. I don't care if its white on black, black on white, etc. Whatever the case, wherever divisive violence continues, we are not going to stop it by continuing the divisiveness and continuing to divide everyone and attack people based on perceived divisions. What we need to be focusing on is on how we're all freaking human beings who have loved ones, who care about our families and loved ones and who have people in our lives (hopefully) who mean something to us. And from there, understand that other people, regardless of race, religion, nationality, ethnicity, and even orientation, also have people in their lives that they care for. We all have the same desires to be safe with our families. If we are able to connect to that same basic desire and figure out how to stop HURTING each other and stop ATTACKING each other ... i dunno, i guess if i'd figured that one out I'd be the next messiah. Oh well, wishful thinking. The only point I'm really trying to make is that continuing divisiveness brings us no closer to any kind of solution. Okay, I'm gonna stop my kumbaya rambling now. blah Sorry.
1 person likes this
@Marie37 (63)
• United States
29 Jun 08
Redyellowblackdog said it all. Islam is an inferior religion that cannot co exist with other religions (this is proven, I'm not just talking out of turn) and because of that, we must all wear kid gloves and watch what we say else we be seen as "intolerant". Islam's grievous intolerance of others even to this day is not something Muslims like to contemplate when they are playing the victim. Muslims like to point out the other religions that exist in their countries as if "allowing" other religions to function on the fringes of their culture makes them "tolerant" of other faiths but the fact is that Islam does not accept other religions and their practitioners. Russia has begun teaching religion in their public schools and of course the Muslims are up in arms about it, but I wonder do those same Muslims have trouble with the fact that Islam is taught in the public schools of say, Saudi Arabia or Iran? I'm guessing not. Hypocrisy is a word most Muslims are incapable of applying to themselves. So I suggest if those Muslims don't like their children being taught Russian Orthodoxy then they should move to a Muslim country where their children will only receive Islamic teaching in school. I for one applaud Russia for not falling prey to political correctness.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Jun 08
Didn't you know we are supposed to protect poor innocent Islam from the evil Jews and the corrupt West?
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Jun 08
oil!!!!!
1 person likes this
@isme78 (104)
• Australia
26 Jun 08
Im sure any religion does not promote terrorism. When we are talking about terrorists we should try and avoid adding a religious creed in front of the word 'terrorist' to avoid offending the people in that religion.
1 person likes this
@zandi458 (27952)
• Malaysia
26 Jun 08
Only in the sense that they've ended up being separatist, a means of dividing people and causing prejudicial attitude and behavior involving persecution of those believing differently. I don't think that was what the Divine Minds had in mind and I certainly don't think it pleases Them to see it happening in the name of God. No religion can be called wrong. Its the behavioral attitudes resulting from many of the humanmade tenets that make them misaligned with divine intent.
1 person likes this
• Nigeria
25 Jun 08
islam is a religion of peace
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Jun 08
But the question is, DO you label every terrorist act by what religious fundamentalism drives it? If you're only targetting one religion, then you're being unfair here. Where is your indignation against christian fundamentalist motivated terrorists who bomb abortion clinics and kill gays, lesbians and transgendered people who haven't done them any harm? Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying they're totally the same, but its the same principle. Fundamentalism kills. So, sure, as I said in my previous post to you, I did NOT entirely disagree with you. But you seem to espouse a particular venom for muslim fundamentalists and don't seem to separate the difference between fundamentalists and the mainstream faith itself. And it's so interesting that people don't actually LISTEN to the litany of muslims who DO speak out against terrorism ALL the TIME. You choose not to see it. Did Jerry Falwell speak for every christian when he said that gays caused 9/11? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MK_hYsCkDH4 If All christians seem to think that gays caused 9/11, why are we wasting time with muslims. Heck, kill all the gays! But, the real problem of course, is ALL religion and how its manipulated by political agents: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THDamlNsuuA You're falling into the same trap by continuing the polarization that the political powers that be want you to do. You're a tool. Congrats.
1 person likes this
@Hatley (164759)
• Garden Grove, California
29 Jun 08
your sin as you call it is condemmin a whole relgion for a few fanatics that the other Islamic people also hate. every religion had its bad people and its good people. yes there are islamic terrorists but that is the minority of muslims.not the majority. so be careful, do not throw out the baby with the bath water. all muslims are not terrorists and all christians are not evil, ut there is bad in every religion as well as good.
• United States
25 Jun 08
Well, the way I see it, no matter one's religion, that religion has a wide arrary of personalities. In every way of life, there are extremists, and the main body of believers don't even like to associate with the extrmists because they won't listen to your ideas. I've seen christians cringing back because they can't talk sensibly to a Christian extremist. I've a couple times have managed to get through to an extremist and get into a friendly discussion but it took some work. As far as the terrorists, what I wonder is just who is behind their actions and teaching them to be terrorists. Surely not the majority of the members of their faith. Also, the actual number of terrorists is small in comparison to the size of their community or religion.