I will "try" and help you.....

@alokn99 (5717)
India
July 20, 2008 7:50am CST
If you were to make this statement in any form of communication be written or oral, would you imply the word "try" as to make a genuine effort or would you imply it as a polite way of saying 'I can't'.
2 people like this
5 responses
@mimpi1911 (25454)
• India
21 Jul 08
Alok 'Trying' has always been an sincere effort to make things happen or not happen, whichever way it suits the purpose. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. But that's after my effort and for something which I can't help no matter what.
1 person likes this
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
21 Jul 08
Mimpi, I'm very sure of your sincerity when you say you will'try'. The outcome at the point of saying it is not definite. The gist of the discussion is to get a fair idea of whether we actually mean it when we use the word 'try' or not.
@mimpi1911 (25454)
• India
21 Jul 08
Nice discussion, alok, as always. Love to respond to them. How are you?
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
21 Jul 08
Glad you like it. Me:- feeling a little rotten
@dpk262006 (56217)
• Delhi, India
21 Jul 08
An excellent Question! You see, while using such a statement, I try to be transparent and honest. If I cannot help somebody in his problem, I would simply say -"I am sorry, I cannot help you out". But if there is a possibility that I may be able to help him, then I use the statement - "I will try my best to help you". My point is - even after my best efforts, if I am unable to help anyone, I would not keep him in dark, instead I will tell him about the factual position, my efforts and result.
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
21 Jul 08
Glad you thought so dpk. You have conveyed the importance of being transparent and honest with respect to your intentions very clearly and well. Thanks
@dpk262006 (56217)
• Delhi, India
21 Jul 08
Many thanks for your kind words.
@lyzabelle (1668)
• Philippines
20 Jul 08
[b]This statement is polite enough. When i was asked for help or anything i would always used that word. I can't guarantee anybody because time is unpredictable. If i say, okay i will help you, and if i will not be able to deliver what i promise that is bad. So the best way is to say it politely. [/b]
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
21 Jul 08
I understand what you have conveyed and appreciate your comments. Thanks and have a nice day.
@paid2write (5202)
20 Jul 08
I have written this statement twice today, once in a private message and once in a response. In the message I said to let me know if you have any questions and I will try to answer. In the post I said if you have any questions I will be happy to try and help. In both cases I was not sure that I would be able to give the answer they required, because if they ask me something I don't know I can't be of help, That's why I said I would try. It means I am willing to help if I can, but I can't guarantee to give an answer.
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
20 Jul 08
Please Correct me if I am wrong, so the message that you would want to go across in both the examples you have given, as I interpret would be ' that the intention to help is there ,not necessarily a guaruntee of the attempt and there is a very good chance that the attempt may not get the results sought'. Thanks for responding. Cheers
@shav9292 (928)
• India
20 Jul 08
"i will try my level best" or"i will try my best" would be a better one.
@alokn99 (5717)
• India
20 Jul 08
Thanks for the response.