Do you have an accent?

@beeeckie (803)
United States
July 25, 2008 9:35am CST
In relation to where you live, that is? I am from Massachusetts, and while I don't have the stereotypical New England accent, sometimes I'll drop an "r" at the end of a word and it's a little embarrassing! When I was a teenager working as a restaurant hostess, some tourists from Tennessee came up to me (very polite, for the record) and said, in the most stereotypical of antebellum-sounding southern tone: "It's so straynge, everone here hays an ayccent!" I smiled and said "That's Mass for ya!" It's all relative...
6 responses
• United States
25 Jul 08
More than half a century ago, my family moved to Florida. When we went to school, everyone made fun of our accents. My brother and sister and I begged for speech lessons so we would sound like the other kids. It was so long asgo, I don't remember the details, but still, after all these years, an R will slip away, or I'll "lahf." I can't imagine why it hasn't gone away completely, but now I feel a little nostalgic for it. I can still tell which part of Mass a person is from, most of the time. I was born in Worcester.
@beeeckie (803)
• United States
25 Jul 08
Worcester, neat! I am from New Bedford, originally, though I've bounced around a bit, even spending time in NYC. And people can be cruel to the New England accent, especially kids who've never heard it. Actually, kids would ask me growing up why I didn't have an accent. (My parents didn't, that's why...my dad is from NY and my mom trained her accent away) The easiest accent for me to identify is the Fall River/eastern RI accent, to my ear that is the strongest/heaviest one.
• United States
25 Jul 08
You're right. Fall River's accent reminds me, for some reason, of Eliza Doolittle. I'm not saying they're lower-class people, I just mean their accents. I don't think anyone else says "Haich" for the 8th letter of the alphabet. Most of the silent Hs at the beginning of words are clearly pronounced, too.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Jul 08
Thank you for the "Best Response". And thanks for the romp down Memory Lane!
1 person likes this
@lilybug (21148)
• United States
25 Jul 08
I grew up in Illinois. I never thought that people from Illinois really had accents, but I was talking to my father the other day and he told me that I still sound like I live in Illinois even though I have lived in Missouri for 4 1/2 years. Maybe he is surprised that I didn't pick up an accent.
1 person likes this
@beeeckie (803)
• United States
25 Jul 08
There is a midwestern accent, for sure :) I first heard it when I made friends with someone from Missouri, he pronounces "N" like "In".
@Valenas (1510)
• United States
25 Jul 08
I want to say yes, and I want to say no at the same time. Within the same city, we have to major accents: Whatever accent I have, and the southern accent. When I was little, and I went to school with farmer's kids, I had a terrible, terrible accent. But, now that I think about it, I have always gone to school with people that have a different accent than I do. I think it could be because my family is from a different part of the U.S., and I was always around them. A big problem that I have is that, if I am around a person, I pick up on their accent almost immediately, and start talking like them until I get away from them.
@beeeckie (803)
• United States
25 Jul 08
Heh, do people think you're mimicking them or something?
@mermaidivy (15417)
• United States
25 Jan 09
Yea I agree Massachusetts people has an accent like when you say mountain, you will skip the "t" or skip the "r" of some words like what you said too. It was little strange to listen to but now I am getting used to and I understand.
• United States
24 Jan 09
Everyone has some type of an accent, whether they want to admit it or not. I am from Oklahoma now living in Connecticut and I'm always getting ribbed about my accent. Sometimes it gets on my nerves. Once while working in a store a customer said I had an accent...I said "yea? So do you." Her response was "I've lived here all my life, I have no accent". I just laughed, and she got all upset and told the manager I was being rude. I still think it was pretty funny.
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
12 Oct 08
I'm from western and central Mass, now living in Oklahoma. I've been here for almost 5 years. When I first moved here, I frequently had to ask people to repeat themselves. Now, I hardly notice the accent, nor do I hear an accent when I talk to friends and family in MA. But, people here in Oklahoma still ask me where I'm from, or if I'm from Boston. Friends from MA now tell me that I sound like a southerner. Guess I'm stuck in the middle...lol.