Yale Students' File Lawsuit That Uncovers Anonymous Trolls

@movicont (495)
United States
August 1, 2008 5:11am CST
I recently saw this article on wired: http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2008/07/autoadmit The article covered how anonymous law school trolls posting misogynistic comments were unmasked. While I have no pity for these trolls who spout such disgusting comments, I do agree with a quoted person in the article that "you run the risk of too much take-down." Free speech is free speech, and we should all be capable of suing for libel, harassment, and threats, but take-down notices of the current DMCA-style don't resonate as well with me. I am in no way defending the actions of these trolls, but allowing for DMCA-style take-down notices could potentially cause unpopular opinions to be suffocated. These opinions don't need to be offensive like the ones elaborated on in the article--it could just be a difference of political beliefs. It's quite possible to pretend to file an official complaint (it's been done), so any random person on the 'net who disagrees with another's opinions could be censored. Your thoughts?
1 response
@Wolfechu (1193)
• United States
1 Aug 08
"Anonymous trolls" has such a layered meaning nowadays. What we have here is 'Trolls who are (or think they're) anonymous', and get caught immediately, as in the case with these morons. And then there's 'Trolls who are part of Anonymous', who would be at least smart enough not to get caught in the cause of lulz. There's no website or forum in existence which guarantees your right to free speech. It's the Internet, not the USA. In fact, most forums (here, for instance), will expressly tell you what you CAN'T say.
@movicont (495)
• United States
1 Aug 08
Nope, that website is in the USA, so free speech laws had better hold. Of course the forum has a right to take it down if they wish. It's about whether the government has a right to force the forum to take it down. In that case, it's the government holding people back, a lot more serious than some company censoring. (Of course, it doesn't hold in terms of libel, but we're talking about the generic application of such a law)