Do you like being your nationality? What is it?

London kid - This kid was born in London to parents from Canada and Australia, and was educated firstly in a French school. He didn't have a chance to be narrow in outlook. Good thing I'd say...no?
United Kingdom
August 15, 2008 9:06pm CST
I'm fine with mine. I was born in England and like being English, but I'm truly British rather than strictly English, because I have blood links with England, Scotland and Ireland, as well as Canada and Australia, and neither of my parents were born in England or even the UK. In fact I'm probably more Scottish than anything else. How about you? Do you like being your nationality? What are your roots? Do you feel you belong to your country? Is it good to belong?
5 people like this
11 responses
@lilaclady (28245)
• Australia
16 Aug 08
well I am a true blue Aussie with english, Scottish, Irish and Welsh blood and i am so proud of my heritage but i am also very proud to be an Aussie...I just wish the governments of the day would stop trying to change things in there name...i love Australia as is...
• United Kingdom
16 Aug 08
Good for you... What are the governments trying to change?
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Aug 08
Of course I am proud to American. I couldn't see being anything else. The main thing I love about it is our birth right to the " pursuit of happiness" and the freedom of and from religion. I also like that you don't have to be born here to be sn American. If you stay here 6 months straight and you can either order what you like at Mc Donald's or Starbucks, then you are really an American. It rubs off on you. If you go back home they will notice.
• United Kingdom
21 Aug 08
Starbucks is very popular here now. Many small town centres have both a Starbucks and a MacDonalds.
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Aug 08
Look out, our " culture" is taking over.
• United Kingdom
22 Aug 08
No problem; I grew up on Jonny Quest, the Man from Uncle and the X-Men!!! Among other phenomena...
1 person likes this
@buenavida (7918)
• Sweden
25 Nov 08
I was born in Finland and have lived most of my life in Sweden, but I can see my first country from my window, on the other side of the river. I am rather comfortable with both identities and feel home in both countries and having two languages has helped me to learn other languages much easier, I think.. I also like to be with people from many different countries, here we have refugees from South America, Burma and Burundi. It is so interesting to talk with them. I have known many British people too - would really like to visit your country and see the great gardens and everything else.. Well, I guess I feel like a world citizen...
@buenavida (7918)
• Sweden
25 Nov 08
I guess we meet more people online in a month than our grandparents met in a whole lifetime. In that way we have been on the Internet several lifetimes..!
• United Kingdom
26 Nov 08
That is an interesting way of putting it. It seems the world has speeded up since tha late 1990s, when most people came online. And of course shrunk! And we live with an intensity unprecedented in all history; while being strangely sheltered as never before too! What an era we live in. Mindboggling.
@wolfie34 (26820)
• United Kingdom
26 Sep 08
I was also born in England and I am English all though my ancestors date back to Scotland and I do have my heart in Scotland rather than England, I have been to Scotland on two long camping touring trips and loved it up there, who knows I may migrate up there. I am not patriotic though, and know that us Brits aren't as popular in the world as other countries and I feel that the Great has long gone out of Britain but that, as they say is a different discussion, different story. I often wonder what it would have been like to have been born in another country!
• United Kingdom
30 Sep 08
I was born in London, which has been described as a modern city-state. Certainly it's like nowhere else in Britain. I don't know Britain too well I have to say and have spent most of my existence in and around London. But my mum's people came from Scotland and Ireland. I have some English blood on my dad's side. I've wondered too...and have at times wished I was something other than British; but I'm happy being British now. English of course; but British in the sense that I have roots in every part of these isles, except Wales, although I have Welsh cousins through a Welsh aunt (not by blood though).
@maximax8 (27344)
• United Kingdom
24 Sep 08
I am British too. I didn't like being called a 'pommy tourist when I was in Australia. I preferred being called an 'English traveler'. I was born in England, lived in Finland, lived in Australia and studied in the Netherlands. When I came home from Australia I had to show my passport to prove my nationality. People thought because I had at that time I spoke with that accent that I was Australian. I think my routes are all in England and way back in the past in Wales. My Great Aunt moved to Hong Kong and my cousin lives in Australia. British is my identity and I guess I belong here, but I have a passport and love to travel.
• United Kingdom
24 Sep 08
You have certainly travelled; that can only be a good thing I think. Somebody the other day tried to place my accent, and not for the first time. I'm a mixture, parents from Commonwealth nations; French school as an infant; speak several languages. But like you, British is my identity, and I like being British.
@falassion (419)
• Brazil
24 Aug 08
Yeah, even with all the problems, I'm proud to be a Brazilian. I like my nationality 'cause it's from a country which has a enormous cultural and climate diversity.. I can find almost everything in my beloved country. So, yeah, I like it. =)
• United Kingdom
24 Sep 08
I've never been to Brazil, but a fascinating country. Music, culture, people. I'd love to go one day.
• United States
22 Aug 08
Hello Carl! Born in the USA and have been told that I am a little French, Scottish and Native American. You wouldn't be able to tell the Native American from the blonde hair and blue eyes that I have.
• United Kingdom
22 Aug 08
Well each person reflects their heritage differently EB I think. Siblings are often quite different in appearance.
@irishidid (8521)
• United States
21 Aug 08
I am an Irish woman born in the wrong country. I have a friend who tells me I am more British than American.
• United Kingdom
21 Aug 08
Well, to have a spiritual home is good. My dad was born and raised in Australia, and although he has been here in the UK since he was a teenager, he still feels his true home is Australia.
@Idlewild (6105)
• United States
16 Aug 08
Yeah, I'm American and I like it just fine. But I also like being all the other parts of my heritage (Scottish, English, Irish, Dutch, Swiss, and Cherokee [native American]). Mostly the first three. I went to Scotland 13 years ago with my Dad, first time there for both of his (his father always wanted to go there, but never made it). We went to the town where my Dad's great-grandmother came from, which was quite a long time ago. (It's called Airdrie, near Glasgow.)
• United Kingdom
20 Aug 08
My grandmother was from Glasgow, but I've never been. I only know Edinburgh in Scotland. I stayed there for a few weeks during the Festival more than 2 decades ago.
@kbourgerie (8774)
• United States
16 Aug 08
I was born in Britain, but don't necessarily consider myself all that British. My mother was British, my father American, a member of the United States Armed Forces. We moved on the average of every 15 months when I was growing up and the longest I lived in England was from 1974 to 1977 while I completed high school. I left in 1977 and haven't been back since. I've lived in California and Arizona ever since and this is where I consider my home. I still have family in England, but they are family that I wouldn't know if I walked straight into them.
• United Kingdom
16 Aug 08
You're arguably both British and American. But far more American, because you've made the US your physical and spiritual home. I have many relatives in North America, the US and Canada both, I've never met.
@GardenGerty (96668)
• Marion, Kansas
16 Aug 08
I am an American, and I love it. I am related to most of Western Europe, though, and learning more all the time. I just learned I have some Welsh heritage. Along with Scots, Irish, English, French, Swedish, and German. I am also Native American. I think I am a good mix.
• United Kingdom
16 Aug 08
You certainly do have strong links to western/northern Europe. Yes, an interesting mix.