The Original Maverick

@ZephyrSun (7385)
United States
October 7, 2008 2:33pm CST
I thought we could all use a little history on the word maverick in politics. I thought this was interesting and figured some have not seen this. Apparently there's a family from Texas that have the last name of Maverick and they were in politics. "Terrellita Maverick, sister of Maury Jr., is a member emeritus of the board of the San Antonio chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas. Considering the family’s long history of association with liberalism and progressive ideals, it should come as no surprise that Ms. Maverick insists that John McCain, who has voted so often with his party, “is in no way a maverick, in uppercase or lowercase.” “It’s just incredible — the nerve! — to suggest that he’s not part of that Republican herd. Every time we hear it, all my children and I and all my family shrink a little and say, ‘Oh, my God, he said it again.’ ” “He’s a Republican,” she said. “He’s branded.”" Do you think that Ms. Maverick is correct or do you think she is wrong? Does she have a point that if you often vote with your party you can't be a maverick? Was anyone aware of the Maverick family? I'm not old enough know this political name lol. Here's the full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/weekinreview/05schwartz.html?no_interstitial
1 person likes this
4 responses
• United States
7 Oct 08
It is campaign speak, and people just aren't buying it anymore. He has not laid out a description of what a maverick in a McCain administration looks like. I do know about his past. Over 90% of the time, he has voted with his friend George W. Bush. Folks, now really...McCain is ANYTHING but a maverick. Ms. Maverick is absolutely, 100% correct. Angus L. Koolbreeze III, who grew up believing that the Maverick was a late 60s-early 70s Ford.
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
7 Oct 08
Ford? As in the old president or the car man? Both leave an interesting picture lol. I haven't heard what the "maverick" administration will do but, maybe it has something to do with mudslinging? lol
1 person likes this
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
7 Oct 08
Why is it that liberals will ignore his history beyond the last 8 years if it supports him being a maverick, yet they are so willing to cite things he did 30 years ago when bashing him? I just need to know what time tables are relevant and which aren't. Of course with Obama we are supposed to ignore his entire history including the primaries. I've been told that his actions disenfranchising Florida and Michigan was old and irrelevant and that was this year, this election.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Oct 08
Interesting story. I guess with the last name of Maverick you have a reputation to live up to. I know that last names came from trades when the countries were being founded, i.g. Blacksmith, Moore and so on. I don't shutter when somebody uses my last name, I don't own the origin so it doesn't matter to me who uses it. The Mavericks can shrink all they want, I thought the ACLU was always looking for a fight?
2 people like this
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
9 Oct 08
I thought that it was interesting as well. Please don't tell me your last name is Maverick too? lol I honestly do not know too much about the ACLU I'm sure that with their basic concept that you're very right about looking for a fight.
1 person likes this
@devylan (695)
• United States
10 Oct 08
I totally did read this article, and I had to laugh out loud. I have to say this, though, and I hope you don't take offense, but the quotes you used here in reference to the Maverick family kind of make a weak point to support their case. I mean, yes, they were liberal, but they were radical even by liberal standards back in the day. That's what it really means to be a maverick. To stand up for what you believe to be right, even if it's not popular. I do agree, though, that McCain is not much of a maverick, and I hate that his campaign has used the word so much, to the point that it loses meaning. That's what really offends me.
1 person likes this
@devylan (695)
• United States
10 Oct 08
Okay, I know you want people to read the article, and I hope everyone does because it is very interesting, but here is an excerpt from it that I find to be a better reflection of what it means to be a maverick: "Sam Maverick's grandson, Fontaine Maury Maverick, [was labelled a communist]," and "Maury Jr. was a firebrand civil libertarian and lawyer who defended draft resisters, atheists, and others scorned by society." I just feel like this better explains why Ms. Maverick is so offended by McCain's use of the word. Good conversation, though. It teaches everyone a little history, as well, which is always a good thing.
1 person likes this
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
10 Oct 08
LOL devylan you're so funny. I'm not offended. I as well am so sick of the word maverick but, I thought this article was very interesting. I actually picked that quote because it was the woman that has the last name that started all this maverick stuff lol.
1 person likes this
@devylan (695)
• United States
10 Oct 08
Cool. I'm glad I can make you laugh.
@coolseeds (3921)
• United States
12 Oct 08
I think she is crying for attention. To my knowledge McCain has never claimed to be part of the Maverick family. And they are so arrogant to educate themselves to the English word. If one would look up the definition of maverick, notice the m is uncapitalized, they would find that a lone dissenter, as an intellectual, an artist, or a politician, who takes an independent stand apart from his or her associates is the point he is trying to make. Maybe someone should tell Terrellita Maverick the world doesn't revolve around her family and she should educate herself.