Is It Important to Be Saved?

Thailand
October 10, 2008 10:55pm CST
Just how important is the idea of personal salvation? The whole concept of salvation must begin with the idea of sin so what is sin. Sin by definition is a transgression of the laws of God either by personal actions or by buying into the concept of original sin. This whole concept of salvation was not something new, invented by Christianity. Through history there have been many God Men. Most of them, either through self proclamation or through the affirmation of their followers declared themselves as being capable of saving you from sin. Julius Caesar was declared a savior by the people of Rome. He was only one of many. To buy into this concept you must believe that man is inherently evil by nature and because of this requires some external force to save him from himself. I don't buy it! I prefer to see humankind as basically good and altruistic. If this is true then there is no such thing as original sin and humankind has no need of a savior. The only salvation necessary is for us to live a life that expresses the goodness of our inherent nature. I find the whole concept of personal salvation to be rather egotistical and a real waste of time and resources. There is no such place as hell. Quit worrying about it and quick thinking so much about yourself. Life should be about helping our neighbors, not about trying to save ourselves from imaginary torments that don't exist anyway.
2 responses
@taurus54 (320)
• Philippines
11 Oct 08
Next to Jesus probably no topic occupies the Christian mind more than salvation. We must do everything to be saved assuming, of course,salvation exists. We must obtain eternal life. That's the Christian attitude. The fundamental problem in this regard, however,is that even if one were to say to a believer, "OK, I believe you; so what must I do to be saved," he still couldn't obtain a rational response. Why? Because the answer would depend upon what the Biblical verses were selected. Some scriptural passages say you are saved by works; others say you are saved by faith; others say your destiny has already been predetermined; and still others say it is decided by God's whim. He simply looks down and arbitrarily selects those He wants.
• United States
11 Oct 08
Ok, here I am a believer and I will give you a rational response. "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved." And I beg to differ that there are verses that point to works as the way to heaven. As a matter of fact the Bible states quite clearly that it is "not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy, He saved us." Funny, I don't feel particularly irrational. Interesting.
@taurus54 (320)
• Philippines
11 Oct 08
Thomas Paine once made an astute observation with respect to Paul's salvation by faith ."One set of preachers make salvation to consist in believing. They tell their congregations that if they believe in Christ their sins shall be forgiven. This, in the first place, is an encouragement to sin, in a similar manner as when the prodigal young fellow is told his father will pay all his debts, he runs into debt faster, and becomes the more extravagant. Daddy says he, pays all, and on he goes: just so in the other case, Christ pays all, and on goes the sinner." The Life and Works of Thomas Paine Vol 9, p. 27 Paine made an equally apt comment with respect to predestination: "Another set of preachers tell their congregations that God predestinated and selected, from all eternity, a certain number to be saved, and a certain number to be damned eternally. If this were true, the day of judgement is Past:their preaching is in vain, and they had better at some useful calling calling for their livelihood. This doctrine has a direct tendency to demoralize mankind." The Life and Works of Thomas Paine, Vol 9, p. 208 Is it any wonder that Jesus' prophecy: John 10:16 "... and they shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold, and one shepherd." has never materialized. One can easily understand how a book as inconsistent as the Bible has given rise to more that fifteen hundred separate Christian denominations. The deficiency lies not so much with the preachers as the book from which they preach.
• United States
11 Oct 08
I understand your choice to believe that human kind is basically good, but I disagree. Have you ever noticed that a child undisciplined is usually violent, mouthy, unkind and completely self involved? Granted if the child is surrounded by well adjusted adults, they often grow up to be decent people. What happens if good kind behavior isn't demonstrated? It is never learned. I firmly believe that as humans we are born basically bad or sinful. As far as "buying into" the concept, it's called faith. Either you have faith that the Bible is truly Gods word to man, and you have faith the Jesus Christ is the only way to heaven or you don't. Since I don't believe that our inherent natures are good, I believe that we absolutely do need a savior. Also, one of the most important ideas in Christianity is helping and loving our neighbors.