Obama's Race...

United States
October 23, 2008 6:44pm CST
I'm not one to give my opinion on political issues, politicians, etc, but I have heard so many people say that we may be on our way to having our 1st African American President. But isn't Obama mixed? Isn't he half African American and Caucasian? My son is mixed. He is half African American and Caucasian. I find it offensive when people refer to him as being just African American and vis versa just Caucasian. He is neither, he is unique, he is an African American and Caucasian boy. I want him to grow up knowing both sides of his heritage and I want when people look at him to see he is not one or the other, he is both and I want him to be proud of his heritage on both sides. In my opinion, he has the best of both worlds. I think we as Americans of all races should look at Obama the same way. He isn't one or the other, he is both. And what does his skin color have to do with anything anyway. It isn't his heritage that we should look at anyway, it is his political views, etc. What is your opinion on this?
3 people like this
8 responses
@sudalunts (5527)
• United States
24 Oct 08
Well, I think it stems from the fact that "they" (whoever they are) says that if there is one ounce of black blood in a person they are black, regardless of what the other mix is. I think it is wrong, because like you said, he is mixed. My husband's son is mixed, but both sides of the family, the black side and the white side, sees him as a very nice young man. He interacts with his black side as well as with his white side. Actually he married a very nice white young lady, so I wonder how "they" would categorize any children they may have. This needs to stop putting labels on people, people are people.
3 people like this
• United States
24 Oct 08
Yes I agree, we shouldn't put labels on people, people are people.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Oct 08
When filling out personal information, It annoys me that forms that ask for your ethnicity rarely offer a "mixed" or a fill-in-the-blank option. It does seem to relate to the pride of feeling unique, and not wanting to fit into such a general category. On the issue of Obama, though, I don't think about his race much at all. I don't think having an African American president is really that important, but I know that it is a big deal to most people. Here is something interesting that I'm thinking about: The "approval rating" of the first African American president will be astoundingly important. If this person carries a very high approval rating, I think it will do wonders to confirm that we are not as racist as a country as many claim we are. To have an African American president who has done a great job will be an incredible feat for this country. However, if this president carries a low approval rating, just think what it will encourage as far as race discussions go. Given the sensitivity of the issue, I think it is hugely important for the first African American president to set a very good example. That is, even more so than a white, or even female president.
• United States
24 Oct 08
I agree, people are people. However, your race can usually order you in a certain place in the world. For somereason, most people would consider any milato person (black and white) black. The same applied for mestizos/mexicans; who are really half native american. Regardless, Obama's race is a bookmark in the US's history. His cultural diversity should actually help us out in the long run because he can bring america back! Most other countries give him an approval of over 70%, much more than McCains 20% or under.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (34473)
• United States
24 Oct 08
I agree with you. They should describe him as the first mixed race president if they want, but why does someone automatcally become black because they have some black blood. It's crazy. It kind of smacks of racism to me. Most "blacks" in American have some white blood anyway. I guess if you have black features you are considered to be black, but I dont know why he is described as that.
2 people like this
• United States
24 Oct 08
I agree with you, but I also realize that there is a standard kind of thing to call biracial people who have both black and white heritage, black. I don't know why and I think it is racist, racist from blacks and whites. I think the idea is if you look black you are black and if you look white you are white. That's the problem with RACE!!!!!! It isn't like that. First of all we're all only humans. Second of all, obviously those stereotypes aren't true, since some biracial children look like one race or the other. My daughter is biracial, too. In fact, she is just like Obama, in that her mother (me) is white American, and her father is black African (Nigerian tho, not Kenyan). I agree with you completely that both sides of his heritage should be acknowledged, but I think as long as people are focusing on looks, it will not change, because he looks more black. I think Obama has acknowledged his white mother and grandparents in his love for them. However, I think in every other way, he embraces his black heritage more completely and it doesn't seem as if he considers himself half white, but considers himself a black man who just happens to have 3 white relatives, if you understand what I mean. I also think Obama has brought race purposely into this campaign, and that he does harbor some ill feelings towards white people. My daughter is 9, and she is autistic. She can't talk much, but has never seemed to notice color of people's skin, until recently, just this year. She suddenly started touching my arm and saying "white, Mommy white". She calls herself white, even tho she is not as white as I am. She calls her Daddy brown. She has always been allowed to choose her dolls, and she always seemed to choose them based on hair or clothing. So she has always had dolls that represent both races. She recently, however, began wanting to have two of the same baby dolls, one black and one white -- only she calls them brown baby and white baby. To her, race is not an issue. People are rainbows and she wants some of all the colors! Now I think THAT'S the way it should be.
• United States
24 Oct 08
I meant to say, yes, I agree too that his political issues are the important part, not his skin color or his racial heritage. His political views upset me, and it has nothing to do with his race, races, or skin color, but only his philosophy. You know, the word race is not used in the Bible? It speaks about Gentile and Jew, different religious practices, but no race. A Christian should not even see race as it doesn't exist in God's eyes.
@phoenix25 (1543)
• United States
25 Oct 08
You are right that people tend to go by appearances. However, I think that people tend to be a little more careful to jugde these days. There are so many people who are of mixed race and sometimes it can be difficult to tell what race(s) a person originates from. A friend of mine was seriously offended when an airline stewardess asked her where she "got" her daughter from (assuming she was adopted) because my friend is white and her daughter is a beautiful mix of white and black (my friend is a single mom, so the dad was not there). I know how offensive that mistake can be, so I tend to not assume a person is of a particular origin and I really don't care what race they are. I am wondering what has led you to think that Obama has purposely brought race into the campaign. It seems like, because this is sort of a first for the US, that race was bound to get brought into it. I think Obama was going to have to mention it at some point in his campaign. I am actually surprised at how well McCain's campaign has stayed far, far away from the race issue.
• United States
28 Oct 08
That is the problem with Obama. He does not embrace both sides of his background. Even though most of his upbringing was done by his white grandparents and his mom. He uses the white side of his background when it is good for politics.
1 person likes this
@Foxxee (3654)
• United States
25 Oct 08
Because some people are ignorant & don't take the time to know Obama, so they just half guess by looking at him on TV or in a picture that he is African American. It's ignorance. People like that should just be ignored. Who really knows, maybe they just don't know what to say. Some people can be really off on the things they say. I would just ignore it...
1 person likes this
@jamesgrub (673)
• United States
24 Oct 08
i think people need to lay off Obama i keep seeing so much bad stuff about him but i think its because people are mad that they know hes gonna win. hes mixed and it doesn't matter what he is people shouldn't be classifying him anyways if he were white, black, mixed, chinese it shouldn't matter. but obviously it does and i think it is pathetic the stuff people will say and do just to try to get people to not vote for him. in my opinion hes a good candidate and i am pretty sure hes gonna win this election.
• United States
24 Oct 08
i agree that his heritage should not matter. but to many ppl it does. sometimes more than what his political views are, which is a pathetic way to choose the next President! i would love to say that America today is beyond such petty points of view, but alas there are times when it certainly seems to dominate more than things that should be far far more important. someday after many years of such mixed heritage children marrying other mixed heritage children..they wont even ask what your heritage is..cause it would be so long of an answer. i can totally understand how filling out forms and having to mark "other" would be annoying. i wonder what would happen if everybody that was considered Caucasian started to mark that "other" and then fill it out from there. i would have to just write "heintz 57" LOL!
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40326)
• Canada
24 Oct 08
I think it is common among those who have part Negro (to use the old term)ethnicity who live in the United States. They think that by some miracle, all the Caucasian in them disappears. I suspect it is not about the so called slave owners premise that one smidgeon of Negro blood makes you all Negro, but about power. If you have one smidgeon of Negro in you and that makes you pure Negro, then that makes you have a larger percentage of people who claim to be African American and you have this larger power base. So the only Caucasians left are the ones who never went outside of their race and by intermarrying it decreases their numbers. So if ten percent are mixed race, and that ten percent has part Negro, and if twenty percent are pure black, then the percent now becomes thirty percent who can claim African American, etc.