Bite me - what does it actually mean?

Australia
November 7, 2008 4:16am CST
And this is a real question, because I don't have a clue. I understand from context that it is an insult, and I use it myself, but in Australia we have a similar thing which is "Go bite your b*m". Why does the American version reverse the object of the biting, so to speak? If anyone actually knows the etymology I'd be fascinated, but popular definitions would be just as useful. Lash
3 people like this
4 responses
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
7 Nov 08
Hmmmm interesting I have no idea. I came across the 'bite me' phrase in a book and I like the character so I have started using it. It sort of has a bit more oomph but thinking about it, could it be an invitation to fight. You know like we say in Australia, 'put up or shut up'? Is that possible. Put up your fists or keep your mouth shut? I see a similarity there. Could I be right? Are there any Americans out there that know the answer to this?
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
7 Nov 08
I'm an American and I've heard 'put up or shut up' as well. That is exactly what it means, if you plan to fight, DO IT, or shut your face lol. See the slang dictionary link I left for Lash in my response, let me see if I can find an alternate one to list here as well http://en.allexperts.com/q/Etymology-Meaning-Words-1474/Bite.htm [i]The phrase is definitely from the U. S., although variations are used in other countries. According to "The Oxford English Dictionary," the ORIGINAL term was coined as "What's biting you?" Its meaning is "What is perturbing or annoying you?" It first appeared in WRITTEN English in "The Saturday Evening Post," March 27, 1909. The expression can be said in anger or disgust. However, it has come to be used so often, it now appears as a "mild retort," similar to "bug off," "leave me alone," "get out of here," or "get lost." Incidentally, the stronger version of "bug off" is "f*** off!" [/i] There is a bit of the info from that link in case you didn't want to scroll through to read it all.
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6342)
• Australia
8 Nov 08
Well I think it has a nice cheeky bite to it.
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
7 Nov 08
http://onlineslangdictionary.com/definition+of/bite+me Here you go, a slang dictionary definition I always use it in a manner of 'whatever' (your opinion is hereby disregarded) or basically go away, and don't kiss my butt, that's an endearment. LOL! I'm fairly sure it has always been a slang term, I do not believe it was actually based on somebody who provoked someone to bite them. Please fill me in on some Australian slang, I have heard a little, but definitely not all.
1 person likes this
• Australia
9 Nov 08
It's hard to know where to start. Give me an idea of the ones you've heard, that will start a train of thought, I'm sure. Lash
1 person likes this
@trell8402 (274)
• United States
7 Nov 08
When I use "bite me", it is equivalent to "kick rocks". Both in my opinion means to "f**k off", but it's nicer than actually saying "f**k off".
@Calais (10900)
• Australia
7 Nov 08
LOl...i dont know either, ill come back and check later,see if you get more responses, hope you do, im intrigued now...