How the MIGHTY HAVE FALLEN !

United States
November 21, 2008 6:40am CST
Yes, it is true. The WALL STREET JOURNAL once was the most respected business paper in the world. Not anymore. Don't believe me? Read this. http://blogs.wsj.com/wealth/2008/11/18/rich-cut-back-on-payments-to-mistresses/?mod=rss_WSJBlog?mod=wealthbeat I say that if WSJ wants to publish stories like this it should appear in the racks at grocery store checkout counters along with other such papers of similar ilk. What do you say?
2 responses
@arkaf61 (10882)
• Canada
29 Nov 08
I see that history shows us that things go in circles. Nothing stays on top forever, or in easier terms what goes up will have to come down LOL Ok now I read the article. In the wall street journal? You're kidding me LOL
• United States
29 Nov 08
Besides being in poor taste for a prestigious publication, the article causes one to seriously question the credulity of the author and the publisher. The results were supposed to be gathered from a survey. I've known only one really rich person and another indirectly. Neither would or could be bothered with such a survey that snuck the questions in among others about their private jets. My limited experience is that really rich people regard their time to be too valuable to waste on stupidity. Nor do they freely give up personal private information. This whole WSJ article reeks.
@arkaf61 (10882)
• Canada
29 Nov 08
I agree with you, this is certainly not an article for Wall street journal and like you I am not sure how credible this would be - not because rich people don't have mistresses but like you I know they don't disclose information this easily
@speakeasy (4215)
• United States
22 Nov 08
Personally, I see nothing wrong with this article being in the WSJ. I used to subscribe to it and one of the sections is "Life & Style" and this is the category that this article would fit into. After all, these women (and men) are selling a "service" whether they want to openly admit it or not. The people purchasing this service are no longer able to pay as much for the service and this affects their "industry". When the market for this "service" is down; they need to be careful not to lose their client or make demands that exceed their clients ability to pay; because it would be difficult at this time to replace their client. When the market changes, then would be the time to increase rates or change clients. Definately sounds like a WSJ article to me. They are not in the business of making moral judgements; just financial ones.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Nov 08
I still recall when the WSJ added non business content such as LIFE & STYLE. I did not like that either.