Why Detroit Cannot Compete With The Rest Of The World's Auto Industry

@gewcew23 (8012)
United States
November 23, 2008 3:10pm CST
Just as Secretariat could not win carrying 100 pounds in his saddlebags in the Kentucky Derby never can the big three from Detroit compete against the rest of the worlds auto companies. The big three get to compete against auto manufacturers that produce their parts and or cars in countries where health and safety standards are lower, wages are a fraction of those paid U.S. workers, and taxes are often forgiven on exports to the United States. Almost as the Japanese did to our TV industry by dumping Sony's here until they killed it so to the death of the Detroit big three. Take for instance South Korea which exports 700,000 cars to us, while importing 5,000 cars from us. The big three just cannot compete against a world which places less burden upon their exporting industry as we do. Washington does everything possible to tie on hand behind the backs of the home industries. Everything from taxes, regulations, and unregulated unions there is no incentive for any manufacture to produce anything in America.
3 people like this
7 responses
@spalladino (17927)
• United States
23 Nov 08
I agree with you about overseas competition but Toyota, Honda & Hyundai...to name a few...have manufacturing plants in the U.S. They're bound by the same health and safety standards as the Big 3 but perhaps their workers aren't paid as much, their inventory is priced more reasonably and the quality of the vehicles they produce is higher. I don't know the specifics of those businesses...and we only own American...but my daughter's Honda and my sister's Toyota have been very dependable cars. U.S. automakers need to focus on producing more affordable cars & trucks that get better gas mileage and take advantage of developing alternative fuel technology.
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
23 Nov 08
I fully agree with you. They just didn't have their eye on the market, didn't care about customer satisfaction, and eventually didn't care about their product. Consequently they started to produce cars nobody wanted. They did well with Trucks and SUVs because the foreign vehicles weren't that great and smaller, lol. But instead of having the foresight that this has to come to an end, they kept focusing on those, putting away with plans for small fuel-efficient vehicles. Now they have to play catch-up and might have missed the train alltogether.
1 person likes this
@gewcew23 (8012)
• United States
24 Nov 08
As I wrote to the person before you those cars and trucks are not manufactured here but just assemblies. All the parts are first made some where else and then ship here, but once again what do I know compared to you.
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
24 Nov 08
If that is true, then they are manufacturing under the same conditions as everybody else. Then your point is mute as your assumptions as to work environment and labor costs in this country plain and simply don't apply. Detroit should be able to function competitively, but yet they decided not to.
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
23 Nov 08
The foreign carmakers have factories in this country and are bound by the same laws. The big three have nobody but themselves and the UAW to blame. They didn't produce what consumers wanted. They did produce cars which rated low in safety tests and which besides being expensive didn't last very long. Even when the customer complaints were mounting, they did nothing about it. They didn't recall cars because of faulty head gaskets or other stuff, even though it was even all over the internet, no, let the consumer get stuck with the repair bills. Lets not re-design the engine to make it better, lets not implement other features. Lets have the competition introduce it first. Women, what do they know about cars? Lets not listen to them and what they want as features... More fuel efficient cars? But we are doing so good with the gas guzzling SUVs and trucks. The only items the competition didn't really do so great. Lets push plans for environmentally friendly and fuel efficient cars into some stuffy drawer and forget about them. The Volt is a prime example of that. How many companies have plug-ins on the market? How many of them are foreign? Yet, the Volt doesn't come out until 2010... Sorry to say, your arguments don't fly, if upper management has their head in the clouds instead of the nose in the market to find out what customers want and need.
1 person likes this
@gewcew23 (8012)
• United States
24 Nov 08
Those cars and trucks are not manufactured here but just assemblies. All the parts are first made some where else and then ship here.
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
24 Nov 08
Well, then you just contradicted your own point. If they manufacture most of their car parts outside the country, they can have it done in the same dirty sweatshop type of environment as everybody else. That would make production cheap and not expensive due to the by law required high labor costs in this country you laid out as the basis of your assumption for high production costs.
@suspenseful (40326)
• Canada
23 Nov 08
Do you want the workers in Detroit to work in unsanitary conditions? Come on now. What you should do is demand that the workers in India, South Korea, China, etc. make their factories more sanitary. I would say that some regulations are needed, and some you can do without, but do not turn the American workers into the slaves that work in those countries such as Korea. Decent wages yes, high taxes, and unnecessary regulations and unions that demand this and that, no.
1 person likes this
@gewcew23 (8012)
• United States
24 Nov 08
No I do not want Detroit to work in unsanitary conditions, but you must have jobs before you can speak about safety. All the work laws do not matter if all of those jobs go over seas.
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
24 Nov 08
That is why so many companies are leaving America and going to places where they can actually do business and make a profit. With all of the onerous regulations and taxes that our government puts on business it makes no sense for them to stay here.
1 person likes this
@newtondak (3950)
• United States
24 Nov 08
Paying each person who puts a bolt or a screw onto a moving auto body for $30/40 and hour is a good part of why the auto makers are where they are. They have also not adjusted to meet the needs of the public and instead chose to push the gas-guzzler SUVs at ridiculous prices.
1 person likes this
@mariposaman (2968)
• Canada
24 Nov 08
As has been said the foreign car manufacturers have plants in America and have to abide by the same health and safety standards as other American workers including the Big 3. They seem to be doing ok up to now and are not begging for bailouts. I think the American manufacturers are wanting everyone to buy big trucks because they make more money on them. For the past couple of years you would not think there was a fuel price crisis as they flogged their huge trucks and SUV's. Why should they be given money to continue this practice? They need some sort of restructuring. I was watching a program on TV today and General Motors have smaller fuel efficient cars in Europe that the will not sell here. Why is that, they look sporty and if it is good enough for Europeans why can we not buy them here? They are as safety conscious there as here, why are we being denied. This Volt or whatever it is being called is just a hybrid that you can plug in.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Nov 08
It only takes 1 car from 1 american auto maker and it will make them EXTREMELY rich. It must have these Speed +100 MPH Possibility GREAT FUEL Affordability +75 MPG, and electric capabilites Horse Power Looks Affordability if one of the companies can make a car like these, all the other companies in the world can just say good bye
1 person likes this