Ever heard of selling a church?

United States
December 21, 2008 12:14pm CST
This happened to a community in my area. Anybody else dealt with a congregation selling their church. I thought churches were sort of permanent things.
4 responses
@jonesy123 (3950)
• United States
2 Mar 09
It really depends on the situation. Sometimes a growing congregation needs more space but additions to the old church cannot be build. Sometimes the upkeep of the old church building is too expensive and it's easier to abandon the old building and build something more suitable elsewhere. The church I attend, the clocktower needed to be renovated as it was in danger of caving in. The renovation of that rather old clocktower was more expensive then obtaining a lot elsewhere in town and building a new church with all the modern conveniences...fortunately the congregation was willing to put up the money to renovate the clocktower rather than abandoning the old church building everybody was still fond of. A new trend is that churches simply have lost membership. The remaining members can't keep up with everything and eventually dissolve and get absorbed by other congregations. The old church building becomes obsolete.
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Mar 09
I get what you're saying. That's not the situation here, and in the cases you bring up, selling the property makes a lot of sense. It's just strange to me to think of something as permanent as a church being a chattel you buy and sell. I realize that technically, it's just a building on a piece of land, like anything else, but there is something more to a church. There is a mystique around them. They aren't like everywhere else, they're God's home on earth. I'm not trying to spark a religious debate, but being God's house, I guess I hoped they were bound by the same rules of life that all other houses are. Still, even in the situations you present, the act of selling a church is an extreme one. It's one that causes turmoil. I think most people would rather have their church half-filled, than sold because there weren't enough people to fill it up.
• United States
22 Dec 08
thats the first i have heard of it. it has never happened in my home town i wonder what would have to happen for a church to be put on the market strange thing to think about
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Jan 09
Churches, for me, have always been about stability and tradition. When you sell them like any other piece of real estate, it really eats into that kind of feeling. But, these be strange times we're living in.
@kerriannc (4280)
• Jamaica
21 Dec 08
My friend church is where persons keep their fellowship. It can be under a tree or on the street corner. The members of the congregation are selling the building. There is nothing wrong in selling a church building. Maybe there are problems with the land or that members decided that there are no need for them to be there anymore.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Jan 09
You're right. Church is where two or more are gathered in Jesus' name. In this case, it was for tax reasons (they were told). Apparently, the tax exemption was running out. However, it is the belief of some that the pastor wanted a more grandiose church to suit his tastes. Which is distasteful to some. Sorry, bad joke, I realize. :)
• Canada
21 Dec 08
I have never in my life heard of that and they can't be very good church goers if they sell their church Geesh!
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Dec 08
Perhaps I should clarify, it is a Catholic church and they are building/have built a new building. So, the parishoners had little say in the sale of their previous building and the building of the new building. It was a decision from the powers on high. It's a little judgmental to accuse them of not being "very good church goers."