More new old stuff discovered in Egypt

@ElicBxn (60810)
United States
December 22, 2008 10:34pm CST
Yes, our old friend Zahi Hawass was showing the news hounds the latest discoveries in Egypt. An area, not previous dug at, proved to be more of the necropolis that goes back to the first Kingdom, and is proving that there is lots more to discover under those Egyptian sands. http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081222/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt_new_tombs Hope all my history loving friends find this as interesting as I do....
4 people like this
8 responses
23 Dec 08
Hi ElicBxn, It is such a shame that -people have to dig these graves, after all it is peples' graves, why can't they leave it alone, I know its history but if there were anything in the graves, it would be taken away to lie in the musems. It is so sad. Tamara
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60810)
• United States
24 Dec 08
I guess I'm of the opinion that in 2-4 thousand years, nobody is going to be around to put flowers on my grave anyway so why not dig me up? Actually, not too sure about the grave thing at all right now, haven't made a decission about the mortal remains of my flesh.
@pyewacket (44037)
• United States
24 Dec 08
I have to agree with you here a bit. When I was younger, I actually had visions of becoming an archaeologist and yes, Egyptologist. As I got older though, I realized that this was in a sense desecration of graves where people are buried. Many Native American people have in the past been in an uproar as there is a big black market for Native American items that are found in graves.....people are hired to search for ancestral graves, dig them up, and if they find artifacts sell them. As far as Egypt. Long time ago, I remember my history teacher saying the Egyptian people were also in an uproar about the mummy room in the Cairo Museum, where stacks and stacks of mummies are. They were offended with the idea of tourists gaping at the mummies and not long after the mummy room was closed off to the public. Then on the other hand though...the idea of digging up artifacts and putting them in a museum..mmm...at least they would be safer than leaving it up to thieves to take the items and making a profit out of them. Going back to Native Americans though....another uproar was all the "False Face" masks of the Iroquois people that were on display at the Museum of the American Indian. Those masks are "heavy duty" religious items and aren't supposed to be displayed, due to their "magic"--they were later removed and even returned to the Iroquois people
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44037)
• United States
24 Dec 08
Oh--Elic...I'm none too keen on the grave thing either...think I want to be cremated..LOL
1 person likes this
@riyasam (16578)
• India
23 Dec 08
cool.i like the old stuff.i have never seen a mummy,have only read about it.only 30%of the old stuff is discovered!!the rest are remaining!super cool!
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@riyasam (16578)
• India
23 Dec 08
it is very rare to find a mummy in the indian museums.
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@ElicBxn (60810)
• United States
24 Dec 08
Yeah, those overlord British wanted all the cool old stuff in their own museaums....
• United States
24 Dec 08
I see you're a fan of Zahi Hawass as well! I love that man, he's always so enthusiastic about new finds. He makes archeology so much fun! The finds are awesome and I'm sure a lot more of the culture will be understood in their study. I'm a firm believer in learning about the past and historic cultures. We always seem to find that in many ways they were just like us and aside from current technology, not a whole lot has changed. The more we understand of them the better we understand ourselves.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60810)
• United States
24 Dec 08
I agree that Zahi Hawass has done good things for Egypt, I just feel he spends too much time in front of the cameras. He kind of takes the limelight away from the men and women doing the work. Now, for all I know, they might like it, but I, for one, would like to know some of the names of the people doing the hard work.
• United States
24 Dec 08
I agree that the people doing the bulk of the work should also have their spot. But there are a few limitations in their situation. Unfortunately most people want their archeology to be edu-tainment. Get a person on there who can get a clear point across with enthusiasm and you can hold the audience's attention longer. Zahi is perfect in that role with his big smile and sincere delivery. Few people care about the people who do the "grunt" work. Sad but true. Especially considering most of the people doing the hard work in Egypt are Egyptians hired specifically to move earth, dig and be the muscle. Many are not archeologists but supervised by the archeologists. There's just too much earth to move for the archeologists to do it all by themselves. When the diggers find something then they everything gets handed over to the archeologists. On digs that are sponsored by those from English speaking countries they usually do put some of the people on camera who do the actual digging which is nice. When they did the show on the Stonehenge village, the archeologist in charge actually did much of the work himself and they did interview the others who worked on the site as well and got several viewpoints and opinions. I enjoyed that show very much. I suppose it all boils down to the given situation at the time. No matter how they handle them, I admit to loving the shows.
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
24 Dec 08
[b]Awesome. The depth of the history unearthed is amazing. If I could take the heat, I'd love to see the tombs in person. If I had the money...heh.... Query: Was this part of Egypt ever green? Presumably, this particular area didn't need to be, since no-one needed to drink, but I'm just wondering. You're the history buff, Elic. Do you know? Maggiepie[/b]
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
25 Dec 08
[b]How the HECK do you find out all this stuff??? MyBot doesn't tell you, that's for sure! As it happens, this time, it DIDN'T delay, it just sent me straight here! Go figure. Anyway, thanks! Maggiepie[/b]
1 person likes this
@jillmalitz (5132)
• United States
23 Dec 08
That is very exciting. When you think of how many things have been found and are yet to be found it is astounding. We could yet learn about so much more of the history of the world. Dig on!
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60810)
• United States
24 Dec 08
Check out the previous comment about not wanting them disturbed. I think its cool and since if you remember their names, they "live" on in the afterworld, so I'm sure they don't mind.
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
23 Dec 08
This sounds to be very interesting. I guess Egypt must have been the most important country of its day if they can have such a large place to entomb not only their Pharoahs and their families but also the entertainers. I guess they really must have worshiped them then as well. And it does give an idea of the Egyptian culture, very worldly with all that god and goddess worship and materialism and all that.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60810)
• United States
23 Dec 08
I think the people that could afford to do it, did it because so long as the body survived, they lived on in the afterworld. These aren't like major tombs, but smaller ones that people could afford to have made for themselves.
@zeloguy (4915)
• United States
24 Dec 08
I know it might be a weird thing to wonder but I have always wondered if there will finally come a day when there is nothing more to find in the tombs of Egypt... what a wonderful place it is (if you have not been there it is worth the money and the trip). Thanks Zelo
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
24 Dec 08
[b]Sigh. Well, as soon as MyBot lets me look, I'll tell you what I think. Back in a minute. (Tick...tock...tick...tock...tick...) Maggiepie[/b]
1 person likes this